Events

« Thursday February 28, 2013 »
Thu
Start: 7:30 pm
Co-presented with the TOWN HALL ARTS & CULTURE SERIES. In his new collection The Word on the Street: Rock Lyrics (Farrar, Straus & Giroux), Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Paul Muldoon goes back to the essential meaning of "lyric"—a short poem sung to the accompaniment of a musical instrument. And these words are written for music most assuredly, with half an ear to Yeats' ballad-singing porter drinkers and half to Cole Porter—indeed, many of them do double-duty as rock lyrics for Muldoon's band, Wayward Shrines. Their themes are the classic themes of song: lost love, lost wars, Charlton Heston, barbed wire, pole dancers, cellulite, elephants, Oedipus, Buddy Holly, Julius Caesar, cockatoos—and more barbed wire. $5 tickets are available at the door starting at 6:30 p.m., or in advance via www.townhallseattle.org or at 888-377-4510. Town Hall Seattle is at 1119 Eighth Avenue (at Seneca). Preferred seating for Town Hall members. For more information on this evening, please call Elliott Bay at (206) 624-6600, Town Hall at (206) 652-4255, or see www.townhallseattle.org.
Start: 7:30 pm
The month here ends on a high note as much-loved Seattle writer Matt Ruff, author of Fool on the Hill, Sewer, Gas & Electric: The Public Works Trilogy, Set This House in Order, and Bad Monkeys, makes this welcome return for the paperback edition of last year's truly fabulous novel, The Mirage (HarperPerennial)—whose publication we helped celebrate in a wonderful evening. "One of the most daring 9/11-inspired novels to emerge after that horrific day more than a decade ago." – Seattle Times. "Ruff is a world-class world builder who, perhaps better than any writer, can create exotic, mysterious worlds and communicate their unique rules and consistent logics both clearly and concisely ... The Mirage isn't only an object lesson in geopolitics; it's a secret history, a magic mirror allowing glimpses into the effects of religious fundamentalism of all types on the United States over the last 50 years." – Paul Constant, The Stranger.
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