June 2021

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06/01/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Seattle Public Library
Lynda V. Mapes & Friends
Virtually Hosted by Seattle Public Library
The publication of award-winning Seattle Times journalist and author Lynda Mapes’ newest book is celebrated in fine virtual fashion this evening, as Lynda Mapes herself is to be joined by Jay Julius, former chair of the Lummi Nation and a lifelong fisherman in the Salish Sea; Deborah Giles, an orca scientist at the UW Center for Conservation Biology; Jason Colby, history professor at the University of Victoria and an author on orcas; along with Seattle broadcast journalist Jeff Renner, who will moderate, all for the new book, Orca: Shared Waters, Shared Home (Braided River/ Mountaineers Books and co-published with the Seattle Times). This beautifully produced book features visual work by Seattle Times photographer Steve Ringman, along with contributions from partner organizations including The Whale Museum, NOAA, and the Center for Whale Research. Through it all, Lynda Mapes’ fine, insightful writing tells, from a particular, human perspective, of the lives of these remarkable creatures, what we know of them, and what imperils them now. She is also the author of Witness Tree, Breaking Ground, Elwha: A River Reborn, and Washington: The Spirit of Our Land. This should be something. Co-presented by The Seattle Times, Braided River (the conservation imprint of Mountaineers Books), Seattle Public Library and Elliott Bay Book Company.   Event registration  
 

06/02/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Seattle Public Library
Keisha Bush with Lisa Lucas
Virtually Hosted by Seattle Public Library
Published this past January, Keisha Bush’s powerful debut novel, No Heaven for Good Boys (Random House), has some basis in her - a native of Boston who now lives in East Harlem - having lived and worked for some years in Dakar. Dakar and Senegal is the setting for this immersive tale of indomitable spirit and will to overcome and survive. “An extraordinary literary debut, as mesmerizing as it is heartbreaking . . . Bush is an amazing storyteller, by turns harrowing and tender, and no matter how difficult the journey, she never lets us lose sight of the two young cousins who are the beating hopeful loving heart of this triumphant must-read novel.”—Junot Díaz. “No Heaven for Good Boys is a compelling, devastating novel with unforgettable characters. Keisha Bush doesn’t shy away from portraying the shattered lives of the children on Dakar’s streets and the injustices that they suffer, but she does so with great compassion and empathy.”—Deepa Anappara. We are delighted that joining Keisha Bush in conversation this evening will be Lisa Lucas, who has just departed her role as director of the National Book Foundation (therein succeeded by Ruth Dickey of Seattle Arts & Lectures), and is now the publisher and senior vice president at Pantheon Books. Co-presented by Seattle Public Library and Elliott Bay Book Company. Event registration  
 

06/03/2021 - 12:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Habitat for King County
Matthew Desmond
Virtually Hosted by Habitat for King County
Habitat Humanity’s Seattle-King County chapter has its annual fundraising program this noon, as the virtual ‘Beyond the Build’ luncheon features a welcome Seattle return by Matthew Desmond, who received the Pulitzer Prise, the PEN/John Kenneth Galbraith Award, the National Book Critics Circle Award, and many other awards and citations for his telling book, Evicted: Poverty and Prophet in the American City (Crown). Perhaps most importantly, people are still reading and seeking to act on its disclosures. “My God, what [Evicted] lays bare about American poverty. It is devastating and infuriating and a necessary read.”—Roxane Gay. “After reading Evicted, you’ll realize you cannot have a serious conversation about poverty without talking about housing. . . . The book is that good, and it’s that unignorable.”—Jennifer Senior. Along with the program taking place today, Habitat is featuring a Beyond the Build Virtual Book Club on May 13 at 6:30 p.m. PDT. Presented by Habitat for Humanity.   Event registration  
 

06/03/2021 - 7:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Heidi Seaborn with Matthew Rohrer
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
7 p.m. Seattle time might seem on the early side for a slumber party, but those tuning in to this virtual poetry reading will be able to make what they will of such an occasion, much less one dressed up as a poetry reading, as Seattle poet Heidi Seaborn launches her audacious, newly published second full collection of poems, An Insomniac’s Slumber Party with Marilyn Monroe, Winner of the PANK Poetry Publication Prize, this collection gives depth and dimension to Marilyn Monroe that not many have accorded here - and goes from there. “In Heidi Seaborn’s An Insomniac’s Slumber Party with Marilyn Monroe, Marilyn is a voice, a mirror, an Other, a symbol, a goddess, and an archetype. She is also a conveyance for the speaker’s autobiographical material—insomnia, sleeping pills, dangerous embodiment, and lethal disembodiment, until a kiss is nothing but ‘a transaction of air’ and breasts are ‘tricksters—…pretend(ing) / to guard a heart.’ Marilyn enacts, for Seaborn, the objectification women are impaled upon ... By the end, the speaker’s empathic identification with her subject is complete, narrating, in tandem with Marilyn, her last hours, exposing “the grief in glamour,” and finally striding off solo, released, as the credits roll. Something profound has shifted. The insomniac sleeps. For all of its intensity, this collection is as brilliantly composed as a Dior dress. I am in love and in awe.” -Diane Seuss. “Heidi Seaborn’s An Insomniac’s Slumber Party with Marilyn Monroe is warning, celebration, homage, critique: at the center of this collection is the icon of all icons, a Marilyn Monroe whom Seaborn excavates and revitalizes, making poems out of documents, letters, photos, empathy, and projection. How much can anyone really understand of another’s life, especially a life as examined and invented as Monroe’s? And isn’t every portrait also, as you’ll find here, a portrait of its maker? These questions, like the aftershocks of sexism, like the tiny white Ambien pill, like the eerie dreads of the sleepless, course through these poems of obsession to give us a lively and novel meditation on fame, addiction, loneliness, and the performance of femininity, where breasts are called ‘precious tickets to a carnival,’ where ‘charm becomes armor.’ -Catherine Barnett. Also on hand is a new chapbook by Heidi Seaborn, Bite Marks, recipient of the 2020 Comstock Chapbook Prize. Making this even more of an occasion, slumber and otherwise, is poet and NYU professor Matthew Rohrer, author of several books, including collections from Seattle’s Wave Books, the most recent of which is last year’s The Sky Contains the Plans.   Event registration  
 

06/04/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Ben Rhodes with Ayad Akhtar
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
A White House official during the Obama administration, Ben Rhodes in the years since has been co-host of Pod Save the World, a contributor for NBC News and MSNBC, and an adviser to former president Barack Obama. He also wrote the bestselling book, The World As It Is, a book which stirred commentary and conversation around the country. He makes this virtual return to Seattle for his newest, After the Fall: Being American in the World We’ve Made (Random House). “The assumption that America was somehow different from the rest of the world was an article of faith in his childhood, writes Rhodes. ‘In the span of just thirty years, this assumption would come crashing down,' he adds, undermined by the very thing that had heralded greatness: a robust capitalism that produced global inequality, undermined the working class, and encouraged official corruption. ‘To be an American in 2020 was to live in a country diminished in the world,’ he writes. With that diminution, other nations rose: Putin’s Russia, but especially Xi Jinping’s China  … The author clearly shows that fear and self-censorship work in the U.S. as well as anywhere in the world. As for the pandemic and Trump’s failings there, the U.S. emerges as ‘a country that killed hundreds of thousands of people through our own unique blend of incompetence and irrationality,’ no model for anyone. It’s a stinging, and entirely well-founded, rebuke of a political strain that shows no signs of disappearing. A powerful synthesis of recent world history that should disabuse readers of any notion of American exceptionalism.” - Kirkus Reviews. Joining Ben Rhodes in conversation this evening will be award-winning novelist and playwright Ayad Akhtar, making a welcome virtual return appearance after being with Elliott Bay last year for his much-acclaimed 2020 novel, Homeland Elegies. He is also the present president of PEN America. Event registration  
 

06/05/2021 - 2:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Jennifer Finney Boylan
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
It’s been too long since we’ve hosted Jennifer Finney Boylan, and we just couldn’t pass up the chance to (virtually) celebrate the release of the paperback version of her wonderful book, Good Boy: My Life in Seven Dogs (Celedon). Filled with deep appreciation for her fellow creatures, both canine and human, this book also offers the author’s reflections on her mother’s love for her, and her own love for her child, who is also trans.   “Boylan’s gorgeously crafted homage to our unconditional love of dogs turns out to be much less of a paean to her constant canine companions, and much more of a journey through her own psyche and the moral needle of the world we live in. What do we keep, even as we lose pieces of ourselves? The dog at your feet while you’re reading already knows the answer.” —Jodi Picoult. Jennifer Finney Boylan is the author of 16 books, a Trustee of PEN America, and the Anna Quindlen Writer in Residence at Barnard College of Columbia University. Her columns appear on the opinion page of the New York Times on the first Wednesday of every month. Her books include the classic, She’s Not There: a Life in Two Genders, the first bestseller written by a transgender American.   Event registration  
 
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06/07/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Jasper Sanchez with Mason Deaver
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Seattle writer celebrates the launch of his spirited debut YA novel, The (Un)popular Vote (Katherine Tegen/HarperCollins) in conversation Mason Deaver, who virtually visits for this virtual program from North Carolina where they write and work as a librarian, with their own newly published YA novel, The Ghosts We Keep (Push). This is teenager terrain here, books such as these helping much with young people (older people, too) navigate uncertain situations and relationships. With The (Un)popular Vote, a transmasculine student sets out to run for student body president, with his own politician father weighing against doing so. “Mind-bogglingly good. This is a novel that every teen needs.” —Kacen Callender. "Charming, stunning, and unapologetically queer." —Mason Deaver. What Mason Deaver says of The (Un)popular vote could well be said of their own The Ghosts We Keep, which tells the story of a young teen grappling with the death of a brother, finding solace, comfort, and insight from an unexpected source. Event registration  
 

06/08/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Seattle Public Library
Laurie Frankel with Marilyn Dahl
Virtually Hosted by Seattle Public Library
We are thrilled to be helping virtually celebrate, along with our friends and colleagues at The Seattle Public Library, the publication of highly regarded Seattle writer Laurie Frankel’s much-awaited new novel, One Two Three (Henry Holt). The author of reader favorites The Atlas of Love, Goodbye for Now, and This Is How It Always Is, in her new book gives readers a moving story of family and its surprising ways, and of being in the world, finding community and conflict in varying degrees. “One Two Three is a powerful and nuanced novel about hope, human frailty, and love. Laurie Frankel takes a clear-eyed look at the mess we make of the world when we privilege profits over people and, brilliantly, without flinching from the truth, allows no hint of contempt, disgust, or hatred to enter the conversation. Three sisters, Mab, Monday, and Mirabel, understand that you can’t fight old problems with traditional tools. Their gifts and differences and love for each other help them to understand that their mother—our mothers—can’t make the change the world needs. It’s up to the daughters to act, to move us forward, to tell a different story. It is the daughters who will save us. One Two Three is the blueprint for a true revolution.” —Nicola Griffith. “In One Two Three, Laurie Frankel’s signature wit, warmth, and fierce compassion shine with the story of three courageous, memorable triplets. I loved this book from the first line to the last.” —Marilyn Dahl, Shelf Awareness. That same Marilyn Dahl, who has long been one of the Seattle literary community’s most vital, unsung actors - in an array of roles and places - will join Laurie Frankel in conversation, for what should be a most engaging, heartening evening. There will be CART transcription and ASL interpretation for this program, which is co-presented by The Seattle Public Library and Elliott Bay Book Company. Event registration  
 

06/09/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Cal Flyn with David George Haskell
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Virtually appearing here from her home in the Highlands of Scotland - in spirit of there if not actuality - Cal Flyn will this evening discuss her extraordinary new book, Islands of Abandonment: Nature Rebounding in the Post-Human Landscape (Viking). The first of her books to be published in the U.S., after a brilliant debut chronicle of colonialism and its legacies (in Australia), Thicker Than Water, Islands of Abandonment charts places where the natural world has re-asserted itself after our kind has come and done wrong, in so many words. “[Flyn] has an eye for the fresh facet and telling detail, delivered with a crisp lyricism…Islands of Abandonment is ultimately far more than a factual survey of liminal geographies, although it’s a well-researched one. And it is more than an eloquent foray into landscapes of the mind. By mapping the ecological recovery now sweeping the globe, it celebrates the power of benign neglect in enabling nature to do the journeywork of regeneration…” —Medium. “Bracing, eye-opening, comprehensive, and essential, Islands of Abandonment is an energizing and important work. It affirms that nature is resilient, given half a chance, and should motivate all of us to try harder, even for the habitats that seem broken or hopeless.” —Jeff VanderMeer. Cal Flyn will appear in conversation with David George Haskell, author the prize-winning books The Forest Unseen and The Songs of Trees, and is a professor at the University of the South. His next book, Sounds Wild and Broken, will be published by Viking in 2022 Event Registration  
 

06/09/2021 - 7:30pm

Virtually Hosted by Seattle Arts & Lectures
Ocean Vuong presented by Seattle Arts & Lectures
Virtually Hosted by Seattle Arts & Lectures
Ocean Vuong, Ocean Vuong: he of the astonishing debut book of poems, Night Sky with Exit Wounds (Copper Canyon Press), and the novel that keeps going into readers’ hands, On Earth We’re Briefly Gorgeous (newly in paper, Penguin), makes his first Seattle appearance, albeit a virtual one, since his riveting evening with Jess Boyd for On Earth We’re Briefly Gorgeous which the Seattle Public Library and Elliott Bay hosted when the novel was newly published, two years ago. Seattle Arts & Lectures does the honors this evening. “Vuong as a writer is daring. He goes where the hurt is, creating a novel saturated with yearning and ache…He transforms the emotional, the visceral, the individual into the political in an unforgettable–indeed, gorgeous–novel, a book that seeks to affect its readers as profoundly as Little Dog is affected, not only by his lover but also by the person who brought him into the world.” —Viet Thanh Nguyen, Time.  “The novel is expansive and introspective, fragmented and dreamlike, a coming of age tale conveyed in images and anecdotes and explorations…Just as he fuels his prose with his poetry, Vuong takes what he needs from lived experience to animate his storytelling with visceral beauty and a strain of what feels like uncut truth…For the duration of this marvelous novel, Vuong holds our gaze and fills it with what he wills — the migration of butterflies, love in a tobacco barn, purple flowers gathered on a highway.” —Steph Cha, Los Angeles Times. Presented by Seattle Arts & Lectures. Elliott Bay Book Company is this evening’s bookseller.   Event Registration  
 

06/10/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Grace M. Cho
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
A professor of sociology and anthropology at the College of Staten Island, CUNY, and author of an award-winning scholarly work, Haunting the Korean Diaspora: Shame, Secrecy, and the Forgotten War, Grace M. Cho virtually returns to her Pacific Northwest roots - and Elliott Bay - this evening, to read from and discuss her excellent new memoir, Tastes Like War (The Feminist Press). This is a memoir, written from various perspectives, of hard-won coming into age in Chehalis as the daughter of a White American merchant marine and the young Korean woman he met, as she worked as a bar hostess. “As a member of the complicated postwar Korean diaspora in the US, I have been waiting for this book all my life. Tastes Like War is, among other things, a series of revelations of intergenerational trauma in its many guises and forms, often inextricable from love and obligation. Food is a complicated but life-affirming thread throughout the memoir, a deep part of Grace and her mother’s parallel journeys to live with autonomy, dignity, nourishment, memory, and love.” —Sun Yung Shin. “What are the ingredients for madness? Grace M. Cho’s sui generis memoir of her mother’s schizophrenia plumbs the effects of colonialism, war, and violence on a Korean American family. By learning to cook her mother’s favorite childhood dishes, Cho comes to break bread with the numerous voices haunting her ‘pained spirit.’ Cho’s moving and frank exploration examines how the social gets under our skin across vast stretches of space and time, illuminating mental illness as a social problem as much as a biological disease.” —David L. Eng. Event registration  
 

06/11/2021 - 7:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Third Place Books
Alice Waters with Eric Schlosser
Virtually Hosted by Third Place Books
Alice Waters, celebrated chef and founder of Chez Panisse, author of numerous books on food and cooking, and a major figure in our talk and knowing of food, makes this welcome virtual appearance about her newest book, We Are What We Eat: A Slow Food Manifesto (Knopf). For this evening’s program, which is co-presented by Elliott Bay, Third Place Books, and Vroman’s Bookstore (down in Pasadena), Alice Waters will be joined in conversation by Eric Schlosser, author of numerous acclaimed books from Fast Food Nation to his most recent, Command and Control. Eric Schlosser, himself, with this to say of We Are What We Eat: “Alice Waters is my favorite chef, and We Are What We Eat is a beautiful, important book. It’s full of passion, anger at the way things are, and hope for a kinder, fairer, more humane, and vastly more enjoyable future. This book is the culmination of a life’s work, a great life, and is a must read.” “Waters, legendary chef and founder of Berkeley’s Chez Panisse, delivers an impassioned manifesto on how food and its quality impacts society and the planet . . . She offers cogent, well-reasoned analyses of the price of convenience, blind trust in advertising, and cheapness, all of which seduce ‘us into losing our desire, confidence, and ability to do things for ourselves.’ Highly convincing and incredibly inspiring, Waters’ fervent entreaty is sure to open eyes and change minds.” —Publishers Weekly. Alice Waters’ other books include Chez Panisse Cooking, The Art of Simple Food, In the Green Kitchen, My Pantry, Fanny in France, and Coming to My Senses. Co-presented by Elliott Bay Book Company, Third Place Books, and Vroman’s Bookstore.   Event registration  
 

06/12/2021 - 2:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Nandana Dev Sen with Karthika Naïr
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
It may well be with a sense of acrobatic virtual orchestration that we present, with our friends at Tasveer, this program featuring poems by the late, great Bengali poet and prose writer Nabaneeta Dev Sen in the new collection, Acrobat (Archipelago Books), as translated by renowned author, actor, and children’s right activist Nandana Dev Sen, who also happens to be a daughter of Nabaneeta Dev Sen. Nandana Dev Sen, whose homes include Kolkata, London, and New York, will be reading in this program, and in conversation with esteemed poet and Elliott Bay friend, Karthika Naïr, who is from Kerala, but based now in Paris. “Poetry and music are both languages of the heart, so it is a special gift when a great poet of the world is finally well-translated. Here, the legendary Bengali poet, Nabaneeta Dev Sen, is re-birthed in English by her daughter, Nandana Dev Sen. I believe that Acrobat is a book that will rescue us and be loved around the world.” —Gloria Steinem. “There's an aching beauty within each one of these translations. There's assuredness balanced against vulnerability; there's dignity and compassion. Nabaneeta was an acrobatic writer, uniquely able to negotiate the tightropes of language, migration, separation, union and motherhood, one of the most brilliant writers that I ever knew.” —Siddhartha Mukherjee. “Nabaneeta Dev Sen's Acrobat is that rare, majestic creature: a book that, through every page, underscores the quiet high-wire act required from the poet. It is a feat whose complexity is only matched by its mastery in inhabiting the multiple selves of artist, daughter, lover, mother, translator, scholar and more. Here are poems that capture the pleasures and trials of the human experience - desire, decay, mortality, childbirth, bereavement, wonder - with unsparing detail and sensitivity, and celebrate the gift of language which helps us transcend them.”— Karthika Naïr, whose most recent book is the stunning Until the Lions: Echoes from the Mahabharata. Others with early praise for this include Wendy Doniger, Amitav Ghosh, Anita Desai, Arvind Krishna Mehrota, Arshia Sattar, Martha C. Nussbaum, Forrest Gander, and more. Co-presented by Tasveer and Elliott Bay Book Company. Event Registration  
 
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06/14/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Seattle Public Library
Frank Abe and Tamiko Nimura
Virtually Hosted by Seattle Public Library
Co-authors Frank Abe and Tamiko Nimura, this evening help celebrate their powerful new graphic narrative, We Hereby Refuse: Japanese American Resistance to Wartime Incarceration, with artwork by Ross Ishikawa and Matt Sasaki, and which is co-published by Chin Music Press and the Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience. Drawn, literally, from intense research, We Hereby Refuse uses three different individuals’ experiences resisting and defying U.S. government decrees that ordered Japanese Americans to be stripped of rights and incarcerated, along with much else. One of them, Jim Akutsu, would be the inspiration for John Okada’s classic novel, No-No Boy. Frank Abe wrote and directed the PBS film on the largest organized resistance to incarceration, Conscience and the Constitution. He won an American Book Award for John Okada: The Life and Rediscovered Work of the Author of No-No Boy, and is co-editing a new anthology of incarceration literature for Penguin Classics. Tamiko Nimura is a Sansei/Pinay freelance writer, editor, and public historian, contributing regularly to Discover Nikkei and the International Examiner. She is working on a children’s book and a family memoir responding to her father’s unpublished memoir of his wartime imprisonment at Tule Lake. She is also the niece of Hiroshi Kashiwagi, one of the principal subjects of We Hereby Refuse. Co-presented by Densho, Seattle Public Library, and Elliott Bay Book Company. event registration  
 

06/14/2021 - 7:30pm

Virtually Hosted by Town Hall Seattle
Annette Gordon-Reed
Virtually Hosted by Town Hall Seattle
Pulitzer Prize-winning author and Harvard University historian Annette Gordon-Reed, whose most recent previous book was The Hemingses of Monticello, is virtually here this evening with her timely new book on the story of Juneteenth, its Texas origins, its resonance today, On Juneteenth (Liveright). “In a series of short, moving essays, [Gordon-Reed] explores ‘the long road’ to June 19, 1865, when Maj. Gen. Gordon Granger announced the end of legalized slavery in Texas, the state where Gordon-Reed was born and raised.... No matter what she’s looking at, Gordon-Reed pries open this space between the abstract and particular.... One of the things that makes this slender book stand out is Gordon-Reed’s ability to combine clarity with subtlety, elegantly carving a path between competing positions, instead of doing as too many of us do in this age of hepped-up social-media provocations by simply reacting to them. In On Juneteenth she leads by example, revisiting her own experiences, questioning her own assumptions — and showing that historical understanding is a process, not an end point.” - Jennifer Szalai, New York Times. Presented by Town Hall Civics and the Northwest African American Museum in partnership with Elliott Bay Book Company.   event registration  
 

06/15/2021 - 5:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Random House
Lin-Manuel Miranda, Quiara Alegría Hudes, Jeremy McCarter
Virtually Hosted by Random House
Along with a host of other independent bookstores around the country, we are delighted to join in celebrating publication of In the Heights: Finding Home (Random House), a lush, striking chronicle of what became Lin-Manuel Miranda’s breakout Broadway production. Lin-Manuel Miranda, and collaborators Quiara Alegría Hudes, and writer Jeremy McCarter will also be part of this special presentation. (Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Quiara Alegría Hudes was also recently presented by Elliott Bay for her brilliant memoir, My Broken Language, appearing in conversation with film director Jon Chu.) Speaking of film and Jon Chu: June 4 will also see the opening of In the Heights as a movie. Tickets ($44) include admission to this exclusive event, a hardcover copy of In the Heights: Finding Home, sales tax, and Media Mail Shipping to addresses within the Continental U.S. only. We’re sorry, we will not have signed books for this event. Please contact Elliott Bay Book Company <events@elliottbaybook.com>with any questions. We can’t wait to see you there! Ticket sales will close at 9:00 AM Pacific Time (12:00 PM ET) on June 15. Zoom links will be sent out 48 hours before the event via Elliott Bay's Eventbrite email. Books will be shipped out after the event.   Event registration  
 

06/15/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Elizabeth Miki Brina with Mira Shimabukuro
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Elizabeth Miki Brina’s Speak, Okinawa: A Memoir (Knopf) is unique in its power and testament, in telling her family story, and then her own: of her mother coming from Okinawa, having met and then to marry a US veteran of the war in Vietnam. Knowing Okinawa was part of her story growing up, the growing up happened in a far-distant suburb of New York. Time and journeys - inward and outward - would be taken, making meaning, coming to terms. “In America, we rarely inherit language for grappling with the fraught legacies of family and identity, memory and erasure, empire and occupation. But in Speak, Okinawa, Elizabeth Miki Brina bravely charts a path toward self-recognition and reconciliation, with prose so powerful and pristine it often left me hovering at the edge of tears. This is a bracing, luminous debut that will long be remembered, and long turned to for inspiration.” —Francisco Cantú. “In Speak, Okinawa, we become immersed in the experience of Okinawa as a dual colony and understand Brina’s memories exist in that diasporic context. And as we do, we see and feel the way trauma crosses generations . . . This book mattered to me in ways I can’t articulate in this review. I really, really don’t know what else to say. And I feel a kind of unspeakable shame that I don’t. The stories mattered. The history mattered. The words mattered. ” —Mira Shimabukuro, The International Examiner.   Event Registration  
 

06/15/2021 - 7:30pm

Virtually Hosted by Town Hall Seattle
Sasha Issenberg
Virtually Hosted by Town Hall Seattle
UCLA professor and author of several well-received books on U.S. public affairs, Sasha Issenberg has written an in-depth account of the many battles encountered for same-sex marriage to finally be sanctioned by the U.S. Supreme Court in his major new book, The Engagement: America’s Quarter-Century Struggle Over Same-Sex Marriage (Pantheon). “In this deeply engaging and comprehensively reported work, Sasha Issenberg traces the story of marriage equality from its beginnings as a nearly impossible dream to its current status as an essential right. This engrossing account of social change, political will and human rights arrives at a moment of great urgency. Issenberg’s narrative will inform the efforts of anyone who strives for a more equal country, and touch the heart of anyone who has seen their rights come up for debate.”—Pete Buttigieg. “At once political history, movement autopsy, legal chronicle, and fly-on-the-wall account, Sasha Issenberg’s latest is one of his most thought-provoking books to date. By reckoning with the stories of those who hoped finally to legalize same-sex marriage, as well as those who were determined to delay, or actively to prevent, such a revolution, Issenberg animates one of this nation’s most recent and dramatic civil rights fights as few others have. And, in doing so, he makes clear not only that its origins were most complex, but also why its legacy remains most uncertain.” —Heather Ann Thompson. Presented by Town Hall Civics in partnership with Elliott Bay Book Company.   Event Registration  
 

06/16/2021 - 5:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Carol Anderson with Christopher Sebastian Parker
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Award-winning author and Emory University professor, historian Carol Anderson pays a welcome Seattle return, albeit in virtual form, for her timely new book, The Second: Race and Guns in a Fatally Unequal America (Bloomsbury USA). She is to be joined here in conversation with University of Washington political science professor and author Christopher Sebastian Parker. “In this extraordinarily important book, Dr. Anderson shows that the Second Amendment was designed, and has always been implemented, to enable white Americans to dominate their Black neighbors. In her trademark engaging and unflinching prose, Dr. Anderson traces America’s racist history of gun laws from the 1639 Virginia colony’s prohibition on Africans carrying guns to the recent police murders of Breonna Taylor and Emantic Bradford, Jr., showing how calls for ‘law and order’ have concentrated guns in the hands of white people while defining Black fun ownership as a threat to society. Anderson’s deft scholarship convincingly places the right to use force at the center of American citizenship, and warns that the Second Amendment, as it is currently exercised, guarantees that Black Americans will never be equal.”—Heather Cox Richardson.   “The second amendment, as Carol Anderson deftly establishes here, was written in the blood of enslaved black people. Our stalemated gun rights debates have focused on the idea that the second amendment preserves liberty rather than its historic role in denying it. This book does a great deal to change the parameters of that conversation.” —Jelani Cobb. Carol Anderson is the Charles Howard Candler Professor of African American Studies at Emory University. She is also author of White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of Our Nation's Divide, which received the National Book Critics Circle Prize; Eyes Off the Prize: The United Nations and the African American Struggle for Human Rights, 1944-1955; Bourgeois Radicals: The NAACP and the Struggle for Colonial Liberation, 1941-1960; and One Person, No Vote: How Voter Suppression is Destroying Our Democracy. Christopher Sebastian Parker’s books include Fighting for Democracy: Black Veterans and the Struggle Against White Supremacy in the Postwar South; and Change They Can't Believe In: The Tea Party and Reactionary Politics in America. Presented by the Northwest African American Museum (www.naamnw.org) and Elliott Bay Book Company.   Event Registration  
 

06/16/2021 - 7:30pm

Virtually Hosted by Town Hall Seattle
M. Leona Godin with Keith Rosson
Virtually Hosted by Town Hall Seattle
Much anticipation there is for the publication of New York-based writer, performer, and educator M. Leona Godin’s genre-defying first book, There Plant Eyes: A Personal and Cultural History of Blindness (Pantheon). The subtitle begins to say what this extraordinary book is, in one part her own story of starting to lose sight at age ten, and how life and all that life is has gone from there. It also ranges far and wide, across cultures and histories, with other accounts of blindness, and so much else.  “This sighted disabled person learned so much from There Plant Eyes! The book took me on a cultural journey that showed how blindness is beautiful, complex, and brilliant.” —Alice Wong. “There Plant Eyes is so graceful, so wise, so effortlessly erudite, I learned something new and took pleasure in every page. All hail its originality, its humanity, and its ‘philosophical obsession with diversity in all its complicated and messy glory.’” —Maggie Nelson. “Godin guides readers through the surprising twists and turns in Western blind history, from ancient seers to contemporary scientists. The lively writing style and memorable personal anecdotes are delightful. This book is a gift to both blind and sighted readers.” —Haben Girma. Joining M. Leona Godin in conversation will be novelist, illustrator, and graphic designer Keith Rosson, whose books include Folk Songs for Trauma Surgeons and Smoke City. Presented by Town Hall Arts & Culture in partnership with Elliott Bay Book Company. ASL and CART will be provided for this program.   Event Registration  
 

06/17/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Amanda Montell & Zakiya Dalila Harris
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Baltimore journalist, author, and word scholar Amanda Montell got people to really look at language with her 2019 book, Wordslut: A Feminist Guide to Taking Back the English Language. She is here virtually tonight with Cultish: The Language of Fanaticism (HarperWave),  a book that feels eerily prescient in the timing of its publication. “Journalist Montell argues in this vivid study that ‘language is the key means by which all degrees of cultlike influence occur’…Montell surveys the indoctrination techniques and conformism of cults such as Heaven’s Gate and the Peoples Temple, as well as ‘woo-woo wellness influencers,’ QAnon, and fitness groups such as Peloton and CrossFit. Combining personal anecdotes (her father was partially raised in Synanon, a San Francisco drug rehab center turned church), interviews with former cult members, and anthropological analysis, Montell documents how cult leaders…employ ‘thought-terminating clichés, intended to gaslight followers into mistrusting science, as well as their own thoughts and emotions,’ and argues that understanding the rhetoric of cults can help to distinguish between benign and dangerous communities, and reduce the stigma that can further entrap people in cults ... Montell is an engaging and well-informed ... This intriguing account is worth a look.” - Publishers Weekly. “Whip-smart, engaging, and utterly intriguing. Cultish is a witty and thorough examination of power, community, words, and the junctures between them.” — Alexis Henderson.  Zakiya Dalila Harris spent nearly three years in editorial at Knopf/Doubleday before leaving to write The Other Black Girl, which came out earlier this month from Atria. “Set in ‘OMG’, as the kids say. This is the funniest, wildest, deepest, most thought-provoking ride of a book. I have been Nella. Every black woman has been Nella. Zakiya Dalila Harris has pulled back the curtain on the publishing industry, but in doing so, she has also perfectly captured a social dynamic that exists in job cultures as varied as tech, finance, academia, even retail and fast food. Oh, beware of the 'OBGs'—Other Black Girls—y’all. As we should all be aware of the psychic cost to black women of making ourselves palatable to institutions that use our cultural cache for their own ends while disregarding any part of our hearts and minds that they either can’t or won’t understand." —Attica Lock, New York Times bestselling author of Heaven, My Hom.   Event Registration  
 

06/17/2021 - 7:30pm

Virtually Hosted by Town Hall Seattle
Omar G. Encarnación with ChrisTiana ObeySumner
Virtually Hosted by Town Hall Seattle
A professor of Political Studies at Bard College, and the author of Out in the Periphery: Latin America’s Gay Rights Revolution and Democracy Without Justice in Spain: The Politics of Forgetting, Omar G. Encarnación brings larger perspectives to bear in his newest book, The Case for Gay Reparations (Oxford University Press). From an international perspective, he notes that many countries, particularly in Europe, have sought to address historical injustices done to gay and queer people over time, through a variety of reparative gestures, acknowledgements, and actions. The United States has not, uniquely among Western democracies, done so. This book looks at history within the U.S., and examples from such countries as Britain, Spain, and Germany.  Virtually appearing in conversation with Professor Encarnación this evening will be ChrisTiana ObeySumner, a community organizer, activist, and CEO of Epiphanies of Equity LLC, a social equity consulting firm that particularly specializes in social change, intersectionality, antiracism, and disability justice. Presented by Town Hall Civics in partnership with Elliott Bay Book Company.   Event Registration  
 

06/18/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
K-Ming Chang with Meng Jin
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Published at what had to be the least possible auspicious time to have a book released, never mind that it was a debut, K-Ming Chang’s astounding first novel, Bestiary (One World) came out a year ago, during the time of utmost lockdown and closed bookstores. Nonetheless, the roar and audacity of this book was heard, people did find it, went for the rollicking reading ride that books that truly transport offer. Now in paperback, even more shall and will. K-Ming Chang will appear in conversation with Meng Jin, author of Little Gods. “Told by many voices, Bestiary is a queer, transnational fairy tale whose irresistible heroine is a Taiwanese American baby dyke. Written in a prose style as inventive and astonishing as the story it tells, to read it is to enter a world where the female body possesses enormous power, where the borders between generations are porous and shifting. A worthy heir to Maxine Hong Kingston, Lois-Ann Yamanaka, and Jamaica Kincaid, K-Ming Chang is a woman warrior for the 21st century—part oracle, part witness, all heart.”—Jennifer Tseng. “Bestiary is crafted at the scale of epic poetry: origin stories that feel at once gravely older than their years, yet viscerally contemporary. Chang knows well that the life of a family—marriage, immigration, queer coming-of-age—can so often feel like a wild and tender myth, being spun and unspun by its members, again and again. These are fables I wish I’d had growing up.”—Elaine Castillo. With K-Ming Chang for this program will be Meng Jin, whose terrific debut novel, Little Gods (newly in paper, Custom House), came out just before the 2020 whirlwind hit. "Artfully composed and emotionally searing, Jin’s debut about lost girls, bottomless ambition, and the myriad ways family members can hurt and betray one another is gripping from beginning to end. This is a beautiful, intensely moving debut." —Publishers Weekly.   Event Registration  
 

06/19/2021 - 11:00am

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Jennifer Steil
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Joining us live, albeit virtually live, from Seattle’s sister city Tashkent is novelist Jennifer Steil. She is there because of circumstance, married to a diplomat. Her being in the world as she has been is reflected in her two well-received earlier books, her non-fiction account of being a journalist in Yemen, The Woman Who Fell from the Sky, and her first novel, The Ambassador’s Wife. And the larger world is again seen in her newest novel, Exile Music (Penguin, newly in paper), which follows a teenage girl and her family fleeing from Nazis in their  home  city of Vienna to Bolivia during World War II. “This riveting, elegantly rendered coming-of-age story sheds light on the community of Jewish refugees who found sanctuary in La Paz, Bolivia. With vivid historical details and unforgettable characters, Exile Music captures the heartbreak of exile, the painful scars of survival, and the redemptive power of art.” —Amy Gottlieb. “Here is a coming-of-age book for anyone who has ever felt their world shift on its axis, from light to dark, from comfort to abject terror, from sonorous to sheer noise–for anyone who has ever had to run. A lyric and heartrending adventure.” —Elizabeth Cohen. Event Registration  
 

06/19/2021 - 2:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Diana James, Pat Kile & Dick Miller
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Learn about the history of a Capitol Hill Icon, Seattle First Baptist Church, which is the subject of a new book: Welcome Home: A 150-Year History of Seattle First Baptist Church, 1869 to 2019. Joining us today are Diana James (author of Shared Walls: Seattle Apartment Buildings from 1900-1939),Pat Kile and Dick Miller, who will speak to the history of the building and of its people, who have been actively engaged in peace and justice issues and actively welcoming and supporting LGBTQ people for decades. Tom Heuser, co-founder and president of the Capitol Hill Historical Society, will also appear on today’s program. “Welcome Home documents the compelling history of Seattle’s First Baptist Church from pioneer days to the present. Through an engaging narrative, first-hand accounts, timelines and photographs, this well-researched book reveals the significant role that the First Baptist Church has played in the religious social, cultural, and political life in Seattle...Anyone interested in the history of Seattle will want to read this book.”-Ann Ferguson, Curator of the Seattle Collection, Seattle Public Library.  Elliott Bay has presented programs with Seattle First Baptist Church for many years, most notably "Seattle Spiritual Synthesis" speakers series. Copies of Welcome Home are available at the Elliott Bay Book Company or from Seattle First Baptist Church.  Find out more about Seattle First Baptist Church, here, and about the Capitol Hill Historical Society, here. Co-presented with the Capitol Hill Historical Society. Event Registration  
 
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06/21/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Mark Petterson with Rebecca Brown
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Rescheduled from March 2020 to June 2021, and from in-person to virtual is this reading by Seattle-based poet Mark Petterson for his recent book, Transfiguration (Spartan Press). He’ll be doing so in good company this evening, as also reading with him, as she would have a year ago, is  beloved Seattle writer Rebecca Brown, senior member of the MFA Faculty at Goddard College and MFA and IAS studies Faculty at University of Washington, Bothell. She is the author of many books, including American Romances, and, most recently, Not Heaven, Somewhere Else (Tarpaulin Sky Press). Of Transfiguration, Kevin Rabas: “These are worldly poems, both in subject and approach. And Petterson has an eye for just the right detail to reveal the world, just as a poem or short story can do the work a novel does, in miniature, in a camera flash. There’s both grit and tenderness here. Read this, and you may come away comforted or wiser, and certainly you’ll know a little more of the world.” Mark Petterson earned his MFA in creative writing at the University of Kansas. He grew up in Prairie Village, Kansas, and now lives and works in Seattle. Transfiguration is his first collection of poetry. Event Registration  
 

06/22/2021 - 4:00pm

Virtually hosted by Picador
Stacey Abrams and Cari Champion
Virtually hosted by Picador
We are honored to join the bookstores partnering with Picador to present “An Evening with Stacey Abrams” in celebration of the paperback launch of the New York Times bestseller Our Time Is Now: Power, Purpose and the Fight for a Fair America. Stacey will be joined by Cari Champion on June 22 at 7 PM EST on Zoom Webinar to discuss the urgency of ending voter suppression and how we can empower citizens to use their power to shape the future. The conversation will be followed by moderated audience Q&A. Our Time Is Now draws on extensive research from national organizations and renowned scholars, as well as anecdotes from her life and others’ who have fought throughout our country’s history for the power to be heard. The stakes could not be higher. Here are concrete solutions and inspiration to stand up for who we are now. Zoom links will be sent out a few days before  the event date.    Event registration  
 

06/22/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Seattle Public Library
Mortada Gzar with William Hutchins & Christopher Merrill
Virtually Hosted by Seattle Public Library
Iraqi novelist and short story writer Mortaa Gzar, a native of the city of Basra, is the highly regarded author of four novels and numerous stories, those published in Arabic. A chance encounter with a U.S. soldier, a man from Seattle, was for him love at first sight, enough to draw him to Seattle and the U.S. even as Donald Trump was literally being elected president. In his newly published memoir, I’m in Seattle, Where Are You? (Amazon Crossing), he tells his own story in memoir form for the first time, a story that has had him living here these past five years. Translated from the Arabic by William Hutchins, who will be part of this program, along with poet/essayist Christopher Merrill (who also heads the University of Iowa’s renowned International Writing Program. “At once hilarious and truly haunting, I’m in Seattle, Where Are You? is a story of so much: war and savagery, queerness and exile, love and loss. Mortada Gzar is the rare memoirist who understands memory itself—illogical, impossible, magical.” —Rumaan Alam. “Mortada Gzar’s memoir, I’m in Seattle, Where Are You?, is a dazzling account of love, loss, and the complications of exile. This Iraqi novelist, filmmaker, and artist, a Whitman-like figure who contains multitudes in his embrace of the cosmos, understands ‘that stories, like meteors, obey the laws of physics,’ and what emerges in the stories he tells to an array of characters, including the statue of a vagrant, is proof that while ‘their energy does not fade or increase’ they will shape the lives and thinking of those who have the good luck to hear them. This is exactly the book to read in this fraught time.” —Christopher Merrill. Presented by The Seattle Public Library in partnership with Seattle UNESCO City of Literature, Iowa City UNESCO City of Literature, University of Iowa International Writing Program, Elliott Bay Book Company, and The Seattle Public Library Foundation. Event Registration  
 

06/22/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Louis Menand & Philip Lopate
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
This evening’s program virtually brings together two  who have done long and hard thinking about the state of things, including how others write and think about the state of things, as time has passed in this country of ours. Louis Menand, professor of English at Harvard, New Yorker staff writer, author of such books as The Metaphysical Club, American Studies, and The Marketplace of Ideas, and a 2016 recipient of the National Humanities Medal, is here with his newest, The Free World: Art and Thought in the Cold (Farrar, Straus & Giroux). Joining him in conversation is Phillip Lopate, very much a contemporary, most known as an essayist (Against Joie de Vivre, Bachelorhood, Portrait of My Body, but also as novelist and editor of essay anthologies. It is for his newest of the latter, The Golden Age of the American Essay 1945-1970 (Anchor), that he is here tonight. These two books, in their own way, cover much the same period. “Louis Menand’s The Free World is at once an astonishing work of history and criticism and an essential road map to the middle decades of the twentieth century, from Sartre, Trilling, and Mailer to Sontag, Rauschenberg, and Baldwin. Every page is bracing; the whole amounts to an epic. In a landmark study of a time when art and ideas mattered, Menand’s very act of interpretation, the book itself, shows why they still do.” —Jill Lepore. The Golden Age of the American Essay 1945-1970 engages a ‘golden age’ of essay writing, with pieces on all manner of subjects by James Agee, E.B. White, Rachel Carson, Martin Luther King, Jr., Joan Didion, Susan Sontag, James Baldwin, Mary McCarthy, and more. “What’s marvelous is the way Lopate’s anthologies . . . manage to be not only comprehensive monuments of deep expertise, but such continuously fresh and thrilling reading companions.” —Jonathan Lethem. Event Registration  
 

06/22/2021 - 7:30pm

Virtually Hosted by Town Hall Seattle
Emily Rapp Black with Lidia Yuknavitch
Virtually Hosted by Town Hall Seattle
Award-winning writer Emily Rapp Black, author of a memoir, Poster Child, and The Still Point of the Turning World, virtually visits Seattle and Town Hall for her newest book, Frida Kahlo and My Left Leg (Notting Hill Editions). And is joined in conversation by Lidia Yuknavitch, herself the author of The Book of Joan, The Small Backs of Children, and more. “This book is a wild masterpiece. It is about everything that matters: mortality, motherhood, desire, love, the body, art, writing, survival. Remarkably, the author is able to express the chaos of grief and anger without ever losing control. The fire of Frida Kahlo’s spirit courses through this book and twins with the author’s own attempts to understand her life, and survive. It is brilliant, furious, funny, gorgeously written, terribly sad and, without being sentimental, hopeful. I am sure that any feeling being will love and treasure this generous, remarkable book.” —Matthew Zapruder. “With endless intellect and intimacy, Emily Rapp Black brings us a book without parallel, a book that will become well-worn by readers who have passed it on, saying, here, you have to read this. In Frida Kahlo and My Left Leg, Rapp Black scours and thinks and confides not in order to write an impossibly original work of art, though she has, but to survive all that has threatened her body and soul … Read this. This book might just get you through.” —Katie Ford. Presented by Town Hall Arts & Culture in partnership with Elliott Bay Book Company.   Event registration  
 

06/23/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Lenny Duncan with Tim Phillips
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
The author of Dear Church, the Pastor of Jubilee Collective in Vancouver, Washington, and active in various other religious and social good works, Lenny Duncan has his own story to tell in his newest book, United States of Grace: A Memoir of Homelessness, Addiction, Incarceration, and Hope (Broadleaf Books). Rev. Duncan will appear in conversation with Rev. Tim Phillips, Lead Pastor at Seattle First Baptist Church. “Lenny Duncan weaves together history and memoir in a book rooted in journeys across the beautiful and bruising landscape of the United States, where the pointed stare of a Black mama at the Greyhound station and a voice whispering sobriety at a Grateful Dead show become ciphers of ordinary grace. In this astounding book that is both fierce and generous, jagged and hopeful, Duncan makes space for the thorny topography of addiction, freedom, sexuality, despair, and race, refusing to flatten the path for our comfort. Instead, he invites us to walk with him, to see what he sees, to inhabit the adventure and heartbreak of a Black life in a country built for Blackdestruction. A book written with tenderness and joy, United States of Grace points us toward prophetic signposts of what is possible for America, if we have the courage to imagine it together. --Melissa Florer-Bixler. "Lenny Duncan's tale of escape from the miserable lot that life dealt him is reminiscent of Claude Brown's Manchild in the Promised Land--powerful and beautifully told--but with a twist: Duncan's triumph comes through an encounter with redemption. I can hardly imagine a more profound story of salvation ...This is the work of a truly gifted writer." --Tom Gjelten.   Event Registration  
 

06/24/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Asako Serizawa with Akil Kumarasamy
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
One of 2020’s stellar fiction debuts not exactly helped by having everything shut down, Asako Serizawa’s award-winning, wide-ranging first book, Inheritors (Anchor, newly in paper), did and has found readers, and should now find even more with its paperback release. Born in Japan, and residing in Singapore, Jakarta, and Tokyo, along the way to her present home in Boston, Asako Serizawa has fashioned a beautifully complex series of stories of multiple generations, in Asia and in the U.S., over tumultuous decades. Inheritors received the PEN/Open Book Award and The Story Prize Spotlight Award. “Powerful, intelligent. . . . A book that deserves to become a crucial pillar in the literature of war. . . . Inheritors reveals an author of fierce intellect looking at war legacies from this angle and that, working her way into their nuances. By deconstructing the toolkit of the novel, Serizawa dodges the inevitability of a war narrative to offer a wistful hope or a melodramatic tragedy. Instead, she creates a more powerful form in which she can align the pieces to magnify each other like the lenses of a telescope.” —Kenyon Review.  “This splendid book is a sword through the heart. Asako Serizawa depicts with rare acuity and nuance several generations of one far-flung family as it’s buffeted by the forces of war, migration,displacement, and that ultimate crucible, time.”—Ben Fountain. Joining Asako Serizawa in conversation will be Akil Kumarasamy, author of the brilliant book of stories, Half Gods. Event Registration  
 
 

06/26/2021 - 10:00am

Virtually Hosted by Alliance Française de Seattle
Susan Herrmann Loomis
Virtually Hosted by Alliance Française de Seattle
Some Saturday morning (Seattle time) delectability is virtually in-store as Susan Herrmann Loomis joins us from Paris to talk about her newest book, Plat du Jour: French Dinners Made Easy (Countryman Press). The award-winning author of such books as In a French Kitchen, On Rue Tatin, and French Grill, Susan Herrmann Loomis has long had fans and followers awaiting this book, modeled on the French ‘plat du jour’ approach of the two-course meal. “Plenty of alluring plates of food for cold months are what the cooking teacher Susan Herrmann Loomis, who is based in France, provides in her new book, Plat du Jour. The seasonally focused recipes are mostly center-of-the-plate fare, including chicken braised in wine with leeks and cream, scallops with celery root purée, classic beef bourguignon, Basque lamb and sweet pepper stew, and even some vegetable showstoppers like potato and chive soufflé, and endive and leek gratin. -Florence Fabricant , The New York Times. Co-presented by Alliance Française de Seattle et Elliott Bay Book Company.   Event Registration  
 

06/26/2021 - 1:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Cheryl Diamond with Lauren Hough
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
This afternoon, writer Cheryl Diamond zooms in from her home in Rome to speak about her new book, Nowhere Girl: A Memoir of a Fugitive Childhood (Algonquin). She writes, “By the age of nine, I will have lived in more than a dozen countries, on five continents, under six assumed identities. I’ll know how a document is forged, how to withstand an interrogation, and most important, how to disappear . . .” But by the time she was in her teens, love and trust turned to fear and violence, and her family—the only people she had in the world—began to unravel. “Wild, heart-wrenching, and unexpectedly funny, Nowhere Girl is an inspiring coming-of-age memoir about running for freedom against the odds. A beyond-harrowing memoir...Diamond's tale might just be the most mind-blowing of them all.” —Booklist. Lauren Hough was born in Germany and raised in seven countries and West Texas. She's been an airman in the U.S. Air Force, a green-aproned barista, a bartender, a livery driver, and, for a time, a cable guy. Her work has appeared in Granta, The Wrath-Bearing Tree, The Guardian, and HuffPost. She lives in Austin.   Event Registration  
 
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06/28/2021 - 7:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Jonathan Evison
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
A Pacific Northwest writer who has been writing knowingly of the Pacific Northwest through a series of novels - All About Lulu, West of Here, The Revised Fundamentals of Caregiving, This Is Your Life, Harriet Chance!, and Lawn Boy - Jonathan Evison makes this welcome return visit in virtual form for his newest, Legends of the North Cascades (Algonquin). “Evison’s majestic and panoramic latest conjures the beauty, power, and unforgiving nature of the Cascade Mountains in alternating narratives separated by thousands of years. Evison masterfully delivers a subtle yet pointed commentary on how society marginalizes veterans and how we profess to admire yet distrust the individualist ethos while also offering a profound meditation on the human spirit.”—Booklist. “Only a writer of Evison’s talent could so brilliantly weave the struggles of a PTSD-stricken veteran and the ghosts of an ancient family into such a powerful social commentary. Wildly original and breathtakingly big-hearted.”—Willy Vlautin. Event Registration  
 
 

06/30/2021 - 5:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Zoe Hana Mikuta with Nina Varela
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
We are delighted to help celebrate the arrival into the book world of an auspicious new voice, and her wondrous fiction debut in having Zoe Hana Mikuta virtually here for her dazzling book, Gearbreakers (Feiwel & Friends/Macmillan). Presently a University of Washington creative writing program student, Zoe Hana Mikuta is not waiting for course work to be finished in launching this first of a projected series of YA sci-fi works. "An absolute joyride of a story set in a vivid, arresting world. Gearbreakers is sci-fi at its very finest, combining the grandeur of mecha fighting machines with the intimacy of (splendidly feral) found family. Zoe Hana Mikuta is a talent to be in awe of." —Chloe Gong. "Dark, fierce, thrilling, and tender, Gearbreakers will make your blood sing. Set in a ruthless, vividly imagined world against the scope of gods and sword-fighting mechas and a crushing war, Zoe Hana Mikuta deftly balances the brutal with the hopeful. An electric heart beats on every page of this breathlessly paced cyberpunk adventure." —Nina Varela. It is Nina Varela, author of Crier’s War and the forthcoming Juniper Harvey and the Vanishing Kingdom (January 2022), who will be on hand in conversation with Zoe Hana Mikuta. Event Registration  
 

06/30/2021 - 7:30pm

Virtually Hosted by Town Hall Seattle
Emma Marris with Jane C. Hu
Virtually Hosted by Town Hall Seattle
Klamath Falls author Emma Marris, author of the well-received book, Rambunctious Garden, might in other times have made the relatively short jaunt up to Seattle. As with programs such as these at present, it will be virtual, but engagingly so as she discusses her new book, Wild Souls: Freedom and Flourishing in the Non-Human World (Bloomsbury USA). “[Wild Souls] thinks hard about what words like 'wild' and 'nature' mean. As Marris journeys from Northwest wolves to rats in New Zealand, she finds answers that are as fascinating as they are unexpected.” –  Charles C. Mann. “Where do wild animals fit in a human-dominated world? The answer, for better or worse, will be determined by humans. Emma Marris's exploration of this question is at once thoughtful, thought-provoking, and thoroughly absorbing.” –  Elizabeth Kolbert. In addition to Rambunctious Garden, Emma Marris has written award-winning pieces for many journals and magazines, including The New York Times, The Atlantic, National Geographic, and more, with work selected along the way for inclusion in Best American Science and Nature Writing. Presented by Town Hall Science in partnership with Elliott Bay Book Company.   Event Registration  
 
 
 
 
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