Thursday, October 1, 2020

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10/01/2020 - 6:00pm

Virtual Event
Ronald Chew with Naomi Ishisaka
Virtual Event
Third generation Seattleite Ron Chew has worked for a better, more inclusive Seattle for more than five decades. His book, My Unforgotten Seattle (co-published by the University of Washington Press and The International Examiner) includes stories from his days as a young journalist. Chew documents the tight-knit community he remembers, describing small family shops, chop suey restaurants, and sewing factories now vanished. He untangles the mystery of his extended family’s journey to America during the era of the Chinese Exclusion Act. With deeply intimate profiles of his parents and leaders like Bob Santos, Ruth Woo, Al Sugiyama, Roberto Maestas, and Kip Tokuda, he highlights Seattle’s unsung champions in the fight for racial inclusion, political empowerment, Asian American arts, and revitalization of the Chinatown-International District—including reflections from his campaign to find the Wing Luke Museum a permanent home. This book is a must read for anyone who is interested in our city’s history. Ron Chew is a Seattle-based historian, journalist, and museum visionary. His books include Reflections of Seattle’s Chinese Americans: The First 100 Years and Remembering Silme Domingo and Gene Viernes: The Legacy of Filipino American Labor Activism. He served as editor of the International Examiner and as executive director of the Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience. He appears in conversation with Naomi Ishisaka, Social Justice columnist for The Seattle Times.  Presented by Town Hall Civics in partnership with Elliott Bay Book Company   Get Tickets  
 

10/01/2020 - 7:00pm

Virtual Event
Nicole Tsong with Lori Matsukawa
Virtual Event
Award winning journalist, fitness expert and yoga teacher Nicole Tsong joins us tonight to celebrate the publication of her new book, 24 Ways to Move More: Monthly Inspiration for Health and Movement (Skipstone/Mountaineers Press), illustrated with photographs by Erika Schultz. While in person events are not yet possible, perhaps the Zoom format will inspire more attendees to get up during this event and try out one of the many activities suggested tonight. Detailing two new activities for each month of the year, the author describes her own experiences trying each movement, then lays out a road map for readers to embark on a similar adventure, starting at beginner level and moving up through "Reach" and "Adventure" goals. For example, readers can choose to walk 35 to 40 minutes twice a week for the whole month, or they can slowly increase mileage each week working up to a 10-, 15, or 20-mile challenge. She also offers quick tips for getting started, basic gear needs and costs, and a "Discovery" section with questions, prompts, and journal space so readers can explore their own “movement journeys.” Nicole Tsong wrote the popular Fit for Life column in The Seattle Times, published in Pacific NW Magazine. She is also the author of Yoga for Hikers and Yoga for Climbers (Mountaineers Books), and has taught yoga for more than a decade, including for three years at the White House Easter Egg Roll. She previously served as Chair of the Board of Directors for Seattle-based nonprofit, Yoga Behind Bars. She’ll appear in conversation with her Asian American Journalists Association colleague, Lori Matsukawa, who recently retired after 36 years as an anchor and reporter at KING TV in Seattle. In 2014, Lori was inducted into the Silver Circle of the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences Northwest Chapter. A two time Northwest Regional Emmy Award winner, in 2020, she was recognized as “Japanese American of the Biennium” by the National Japanese American Citizens League. Signed books are available from The Elliott Bay Book Company.     Get Tickets  
 

10/01/2020 - 7:30pm

Virtual Event
Stuart Getty with Max Delsohn
Virtual Event
Genderqueer writer, speaker and filmmaker Stuart Getty addresses all your burning questions in this gender-friendly primer, How to They/Them: A Visual Guide to Nonbinary Pronouns and the World of Gender Fluidity (Sasquatch), which includes illustrations by Brooke Thynge.  “This is totally cool. It’s an accessibly rigorous introduction to the singular they pronoun and likewise this, I think, workbook paws around connecting they-ness to the bordering and genuinely simultaneous realm of sexuality in its multiplicity of ways of feeling not ‘like’ but genuinely truly being oneself. Also the drawings are good, it just all feels direct (phew)—which is what we need—and it would be a boon to hand this book to so many people, so please do that. Plus it’s a useful read to remind yourself that you aren’t alone and do exist. I’m glad to have read it.” —Eileen Myles. Presented by Town Hall Civics in partnership with Elliott Bay Book Company.   get tickets  
 

10/02/2020 - 7:00pm

Virtual Event
Kristen Millares Young with Melanie McFarland
Virtual Event
Months after a proper launch was planned, we finally  get to help our friends and neighbors at Hugo House celebrate  a still-new book - and author - being in the world this evening as Seattle writer Kristen Millares Young reads and discusses her much-anticipated debut novel, Subduction (Red Hen Press). “Set in the Pacific Northwest, Subduction is a lyrical forest of storytelling rooted in indigenous voices and invaded by those who would steal the tongues and hearts of the ones they love while bartering and betraying the idea of belonging to a land, a birthright, and a family. When you read Kristen Millares Young’s words, you understand how it is we can steal, can betray, can love.”—Shawn Wong. “In this commanding novel, Kristen Millares Young captures the brutality of an anthropological gaze upon a Makah community. Her complex, exquisitely shaped characters embody the calamity of intrusion and the beauty of resilience."—Elissa Washuta. "The brilliance of Subduction only suggests the wonders to come. It is a good day for us when Kristen Millares Young puts pen to paper. Highly recommended." —Luis Alberto Urrea. Joining Kristen Millares Young in conversation this evening will be journalist and TV critic Melanie McFarland. An award-winning journalist, Kristen Millares Young is also the editor of the recent Seattle UNESCO City of Literature anthology, Seismic.  Presented by Hugo House, Red Hen Press, and Elliott Bay Book Company.   get tickets  
 
 
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10/04/2020 - 3:00pm

Virtual Event
Louise Erdrich & Ann Patchett with Laura Flynn
Virtual Event
Louise Erdrich and Ann Patchett, two  beloved, award-winning authors who also own independent bookstores (Louise Erdrich with Birchbark Books in Minneapolis, Ann Patchett with Parnassus Books in Nashville), host this hour-long discussion of being writers and citizens in this crucial moment - and will share lists of books they recommend for helping see us through. Part of the discussion will be about voting, and making sure others - not just those tuned into this - do so, and have their voting rights protected.  Joining the conversation will be Laura Flynn of the Movement Voter Project or MVP (www.movement.vote).  Co-presented with bookstores and individuals across the country.   Event Registration  
 
 

10/06/2020 - 6:00pm

Virtual Event
Shannon Lee
Virtual Event
Bruce Lee is a cultural icon, renowned the world over for his martial arts and film legacy. But Lee was also a deeply philosophical thinker, learning at an early age that martial arts are more than just an exercise in physical discipline-they are an apt metaphor for living a fully realized life. In her new book, Be Water, My Friend: The Teachings of Bruce Lee (Flatiron Press), Bruce Lee's daughter Shannon Lee shares the concepts at the core of his philosophies, showing how they can serve as tools of personal growth and self-actualization. Each chapter brings a lesson from Bruce Lee's teachings, expanding on the foundation of his iconic "be water" philosophy. Over the course of the book, we discover how being like water allows us to embody fluidity and naturalness in life, bringing us closer to our essential flowing nature and our ability to be powerful, self-expressed, and free. Please join us for a talk and onstage conversation with Shannon Lee. Shannon Lee is the CEO and Owner of the Bruce Lee Family Companies and President of the Bruce Lee Foundation, as well as the daughter of the legendary martial artist and cultural icon, Bruce Lee. Shannon's mission is to provide access to her father's philosophy and life through education and entertainment. She is the creator of Camp Bruce Lee through the Bruce Lee Foundation, and has spoken at TED, TEDx, and Creative Mornings, to name a few. Shannon lives in California with her daughter, Wren, where she co-hosts the Bruce Lee Podcast and executive produces Cinemax's Warrior. A portion of ticket proceeds benefit the Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience. Find out more about the Museum and its work at www.wingluke.org.  "As part of its mission to preserve and celebrate Asian Pacific American history, Wing Luke Museum has been working closely with the Bruce Lee Foundation to tell Bruce Lee's Seattle story in the museum's Do You Know Bruce? exhibit series and walking tour. Part 4, A Dragon Lives Here, focuses on how Seattle inspired his barrier-breaking approach to martial arts and film. A Dragon Lives Here and Wing Luke Museum's other in-depth exhibits will reopen to the public later this year." Please note: If you plan on joining the event from outside the Continental U.S., please purchase a General Admission ticket. Copies of the book to be shipped outside the Continental U.S. must be ordered separately from the Elliott Bay Book Company's website (www.elliottbaybook.com) as shipping charges apply. $35 tickets include admission to this talk and a copy of Be Water, My Friend and a bookplate signed by Shannon Lee, and $10 tickets only include admission to the talk. Event Registration  
 

10/06/2020 - 7:00pm

Virtual Event
John Seibert Farnsworth & Lyanda Lynn Haupt
Virtual Event
Two stellar Northwest writers of natural history share the virtual platform this evening with Hugo House faculty member and Senior Lecturer in Environmental Studies and Sciences, Emeritus John Seibert Farnsworth reading and talking about his new book, Nature Beyond Solitude: Notes from the Field (Comstock Associates). Also on hand will be Seattle writer Lyanda Lynn Haupt, whose most recent book is the Washington State Book Award-winning Mozart’s Starling (Little, Brown Spark). "In this utterly original investigation, Farnsworth takes us deep into the hearts of field stations along the West coast and, by working alongside scientists and students, shows us why they remain essential. Witty, attentive, and familiar, this book will change what you thought you knew about nature study in the modern era. If you love the living world, read it right now." - Robert Michael Pyle. “Mozart’s Starling is a delightful, enlightening, breathless flight.”—Garth Stein. Presented by Hugo House.   get tickets  
 
 

10/08/2020 - 6:00pm

Virtual Event
Ebo Barton with Tara Hardy
Virtual Event
“Ebo Barton is the queer echo to the first whisper of revolution.” This is what author Tara Hardy had to say about spoken word poet Ebo Barton’s first collection of poetry, Insubordinate, which explores Barton’s discovery of themselves, acknowledging their history, and navigating a world not ready for their existence. Now Barton invites us to hear selections from their collection, and join in conversation with Hardy about the work and generally about being in a body in the world. A leader in arts and activism, Ebo Barton is committed to creating opportunities for others to organize, heal, and rejoice. From weekly open mics to curated shows like Alchemy Poetry with Ben Yisrael to educating across the country at various institutions, 2020 Jack Straw Writing Fellow and 2016 5th ranked poet in the world, Ebo Barton’s written, performative, and community work demands societal reckoning. Tara Hardy is a working class, Queer, Femme, Disabled poet and founder of Bent, a writing institute for LGBTQ+ people in Seattle. The author of two books, including My, My, My, My, My, won a Washington State Book Award.   Event registration  
 

10/09/2020 - 6:00pm

Virtual Event
Sean B. Carroll
Virtual Event
Sean B. Carroll, the Balo-Simon Chair of Biology at the University of Maryland and author of several well-received books on the sciences, including National Book Award finalist Remarkable Creatures, virtually visits with his newest book, A Series of Fortunate Events: Chance and the Making of the Planet, Life, and You (Princeton University Press).  "In A Series of Fortunate Events, Sean Carroll pulls off a remarkable feat. He handles the 'Big Question'—the role of chance in the making of our bodies and our planet—with wit and scientific rigor. Carroll treats us to a tour of Earth history, DNA, cancer, and evolution that is awe-inspiring, urgent, and even at times laugh-out-loud funny."—Neil Shubin. "Golf games, coincidental immunity, and pandemics: A Series of Fortunate Events ranges from examining trivial events to sobering ones, but remains relevant throughout, revealing how chance affects everyday life." —Rebecca Foster, Foreword Reviews. Presented by Town Hall Science in partnership with Elliott Bay Book Company.   get tickets  
 

10/09/2020 - 7:00pm

Virtual Event
Adam Johnson with Peter Mountford
Virtual Event
Originally scheduled for earlier in the year, and derailed for the reasons everything has been derailed this year, National Book Award-, Pulitzer Prize- and Story Prize-winning author Adam Johnson gives this virtually-presented craft talk on writing research-based narratives as part of Hugo House’s Word Works series. He’ll be joined, following his talk, in discussion and q&a with novelist and former Hugo House programs director Peter Mountford. Adam Johnson’s books include Fortune Smiles, The Orphan Master’s Son, Emporium, and Parasites Like Us. Presented by Hugo House.   Get Tickets  
 
 
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10/12/2020 - 6:00pm

Virtual Event
David Biespiel with Emily Warn
Virtual Event
Portland poet, essayist, and memoirist David Biespiel, presently Poet-in-Residence at Oregon State University, visits virtually up the I-5/Cascades corridor to read and discuss his newest book, A Place of Exodus: Home, Memory, and Texas (Kelson Books), in a year that also sees Kelson Books issuing a tenth anniversary edition of his writing craft book, Every Writer Has a Thousand Faces. Joining him in conversation will be esteemed Seattle poet Emily Warn. "A distinguished poet reflects on his Texas roots and on the Orthodox Jewish upbringing from which he distanced himself...In this moving, erudite book, the author offers an intimate, searching meditation on personal identity, and he effectively investigates the universal question of the nature and meaning of home." — Kirkus Reviews. “David Biespiel vividly recreates his unlikely Jewish upbringing in Houston, Texas, and movingly tells the story of how he moved away from the dictates and certainties of his childhood religion. He raises large questions about the meaning of home and the nature of exile, which is why A Place of Exodus is such a keen reckoning. It is even a sort of homecoming.”  — Edward Hirsch.   Event registration  
 

10/12/2020 - 7:30pm

Virtual Event
Tana French with Ruth Ware
Virtual Event
Our friends at Seattle Arts & Lectures bring this virtual night of suspenseful engagement, as much-praised bestselling novelist Tana French joins, presumably from her Dublin home (though this be wee hours there) to discuss her just-released new novel, The Searcher (Viking). She’ll be joined online in conversation by Ruth Ware, herself a bestselling crime fiction author.    “A slow-burn stunner that will keep readers turning the pages late into the night. Recommend to the author’s legions of fans, as well as those who enjoy crime fiction set in small towns like Julia Keller’s or Jane Harper’s novels.”—Library Journal. “In another stand-alone, French again displays impressive versatility…French skillfully builds suspense…a fine thriller, but also a moving story of an unlikely friendship that grows from refinishing a ramshackle desk to rebuilding two nearly broken lives.”—Booklist. Presented by Seattle Arts & Lectures in partnership with Elliott Bay Book Company. Tickets, which include a copy of The Searcher (to be shipped by Elliott Bay) except in the case of student/under 25 admissions.   get tickets  
 

10/12/2020 - 7:30pm

Virtual Event
​Richard Rothstein with Michael Brown
Virtual Event
A groundbreaking book that has received renewed attention as readers seek to learn more about systemic racism and how it has operated, under the radar of perception for many, Richard Rothstein’s The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America (Liveright) is the focus for this evening’s program, along with a discussion of how its contents are manifest here in Seattle and elsewhere yet today. First published in 2017, Richard Rothstein appeared at Elliott Bay earlier on, kindling a readership and interest in the book that has never abated.  Joining Richard Rothstein, a Fellow at the Thurgood Marshall Institute of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund and a Fellow of the Haas Institute at the University of California-Berkeley, in this evening’s virtual program will be Michael Brown of the Seattle Foundation, who will moderate; and a panel of King County Councilmember Claudia Balducci; Colleen Echohawk of the Chief Seattle Club; and Seattle City Councilmember Teresa Mosqueda. This program is part of Affordable Housing Week, and supported by the West Coast Poverty Center, Seattle for Everyone, Pacifica Law Group, and Whatcom Housing Alliance. “Through meticulous research and powerful human stories, Rothstein reveals a history of racism hiding in plain sight and compels us to confront the consequences of the intentional, decades-long governmental policies that created a segregated America.” - Sherrilyn A. Ifill. Presented by Town Hall Seattle and the Housing Development Consortium of Seattle-King County in partnership with Elliott Bay Book Company.   Event registration  
 

10/13/2020 - 6:00pm

Virtual Event
Jessica Luther and Kavitha A. Davidson with Soraya Nadia McDonald
Virtual Event
Sportswriters and co-authors Jessica Luther and Kavitha A. Davidson virtually visit tonight with a new book that is garnering attention all over the place. Loving Sports When They Don't Love You Back: Dilemmas of the Modern Fan (University of Texas) goes beyond the occasional column that sportswriters might write on the subject to give an in-depth look at the place spectator sports play in people’s lives, especially when factors above and beyond lost games or failed performances weigh into the picture. Joining the authors in discussion will be culture critic Soraya Nadia McDonald. “I am thankful for this text as a reminder, among a great many other things, that affection can come with a responsibility. Luther and Davidson thoughtfully reckon with sports and their long history of inequity, seeking accountability without dimming the impact that sports have had on their lives, and many lives beyond theirs. This is a generous book, one that I will sit with for years to come.” -Hanif Abdurraqib. “This book is just so good. It stands on its own two feet as something that I think is really going to mark this time in which we live…people are going to say '2020 sports' and they're going to look at this book.” - Dave Zirin, Edge of Sports. Presented by Town Hall Seattle in partnership with Elliott Bay Book Company.   Event registration  
 

10/13/2020 - 7:30pm

Virtual Event
Shubhangi Swarup
Virtual Event
We span the globe with this virtual program featuring Mumbai-based writer Shubhangi Swarup. Two years ago, friends from India delivered a small assortment of novels and poetry that were then newly published there. One of them leapt out, the utterly astonishing novel that is Shubhangi Swarup’s Latitudes of Longing. We found out early on that it would be published in the US by our friends and colleagues at One World in New York, and here it has been, released here back in the time when no one was going into bookstores anywhere. Carrying a weight and gravity that embraces the human, but also goes well beyond it, Latitudes of Longing takes readers from the Andaman Islands to Yangoon, thence to Kathmandu, and lastly to Ladakh, telling a chronologically linked series of stories. These stories connect the human in sometimes astonishing ways, transcendent moments of life, death, and love, the latter of a sudden, surprise dimension that can take the breath away. “The lush monsoon-soaked Andaman Islands. The snow deserts of Ladakh. The valley of Kathmandu. The jagged edge of Burma. Swarup’s lyrical debut exalts in the majesty of the South Asian subcontinent by framing every one of her characters against these spectacular landscapes. . . . Generous doses of magical realism mixed in with regional folklore add to the atmospheric charm . . . These sumptuous and haunting narratives confirm a character’s worst suspicion that ‘reality is the worst story ever written.’ Fiction is infinitely better, especially when it offers true escape like this one.”—Booklist.  “Incandescent! What a treasure. Thank you for this gem. It should be galloping across the galaxies. Or maybe not so that those of us who have run into it can keep the experience as a cultish and delectable secret!”—Yvonne Adhiambo Owuor. Presented by Elliott Bay Book Company in association with Tasveer and its Tasveer South Asia Literary Festival/TSAL (starting October 20).   Event Registration  
 

10/14/2020 - 6:00pm

Virtual Event
Kazim Ali & Rick Barot with Paisley Rekdal
Virtual Event
Two stellar poets are joined by a third in reading and conversation via virtual means here this evening. Kazim Ali, poet, translator (in more directions than one), novelist, memoirist, writer in various forms (this doesn’t begin to say it) is on hand with his newest book of poems, The Voice of Sheila Chandra (Alice James Books). Reading with him, in what would be the ‘host’ position were we doing this in-person is Tacoma-based poet and head of the Rainier Writing Workshop at Pacific Lutheran University, Rick Barot, whose new collection, The Galleons (Milkweed Editions), has just been longlisted for the 2020 National Book Awards. Joining them in conversation will be poet Paisley Rekdal, whose most recent books are Nightingale (poetry) and The Broken Country (prose). “Kazim Ali’s newest collection of poems is brilliant and chilling and filled with sound. The Voice of Sheila Chandra is alive with formal invention and innovation that will surely be a fixture in contemporary poetry for years to come. Part researched document, part song, part deep excavation of the soul, there is much to learn from this book. Ali forces us to contend with history & the present in order to imagine a future where we survive.”—sam sax. “Both stately and restless, Rick Barot’s The Galleons wrestles European mercantilism with an intimate grip, tracing a personal and historical journey from the Philippines to the Americas. With his ‘grudging faith / in the particular,’ Barot deftly oscillates between the sensuous beauty of a life keenly observed and the larger forces that inform and threaten it. ‘Longer than I can remember,’ he writes, ‘I have prayed to the patron saint / of eyesight for a new way, a new accuracy.’ Reader, his prayers have been answered!” ―Philip Metres. Presented by Elliott Bay Book Company in association with Tasveer and Tasveer South Asia Literary Festival/TSAL (starting October 20), in which Kazim Ali will also be participating.   Event Registration  
 

10/14/2020 - 6:00pm

Virtual Event
Steve Davis with Chelsea Clinton
Virtual Event
Seattle’s Steve Davis, former CEO of PATH and also former CEO of Corbis, along with other high-level positions in high-profile organizations, does this virtual Town Hall program with Chelsea Clinton for his new book Undercurrents: Channeling Outrage to Spark Practical Activism (Wiley). "Steve Davis's vast experiences and keen insights help us appreciate the power of community- based activism and other important trends, to enable citizens to demand social accountability and make lasting change. Everyone should read Undercurrents to better understand what's really going on in the world today and how to find a better way forward together."―Githinji Gitahi. "In Undercurrents, Steve Davis owns his optimism―and gives readers bountiful reasons why we too should be optimistic. Steve roots his optimism both in how much progress we have made against poverty, inequities and injustices over recent years and also how clear the path forward is to further ameliorate these age-old scourges. This book is for anyone who wants to live in a better world―and to help build it, fiercely and persistently, while enjoying the work, with laughter alongside the anxiety. If that's you, if any of that's you, I hope you'll read it and share it widely."―Chelsea Clinton. Presented by Town Hall Civics in partnership with Elliott Bay Book Company.   Event registration  
 

10/15/2020 - 5:00pm

Virtual Event
Khadijah Queen & Stephen Graham Jones with Mackenzie Suess
Virtual Event
This pairing of a new book of poems with a highly touted new horror novel might seem like an unlikely pairing, but poet Khadijah Queen and novelist Stephen Graham Jones, besides sharing Colorado as their place of residence, are friends with something up their sleeve for this, saying it will be a program of ‘horror and haunting in poetry and fiction.’ It should be good and enlivening, Khadijah Queen having just published a mind-blowing new book of poems, Anodyne (Tin House), and Stephen Graham Jones, a much-anticipated new novel, The Only Good Indians (Saga Press). “Khadijah Queen’s poems are fire and sacred song. From heart-stopping familial narratives—a son awash in sadness, an aging mother’s boulder-smiting love, a brother turned to dust by a bullet—to formal inventiveness and experimentation, this is writing that makes the hardship of being alive transcendent. . . . Anodyne is urgent and fragile, manifesting the beautiful danger in being alive.”—Alex Lemon. “The Only Good Indians is scary good. Stephen Graham Jones is one of our most talented and prolific living writers. The book is full of humor and bone chilling images. It’s got love and revenge, blood and basketball. More than I could have asked for in a novel. It also both reveals and subverts ideas about contemporary Native life and identity. Novels can do some much to render actual and possible lives lived. Stephen Graham Jones truly knows how to do this, and how to move us through a story at breakneck (literally) speed. I’ll never see an elk or hunting, or what a horror novel can do the same way again.”—Tommy Orange. The conversation this evening will be moderated by CU Boulder MFA student, Mackenzie Suess.   Event Registration  
 
 

10/17/2020 - 2:00pm

Virtual Event
Jennifer Nansubuga Makumbi
Virtual Event
What should be an extraordinary online program would be nothing short of truly tremendous in-person, given that some of us have seen Jennifer Nansubuga Makumbi read and discuss her work in front of a live audience. Originally from Uganda, presently based in London, she is the author of an earlier novel, Kintu, and book of stories, Let’s Tell This Story Properly, which have been published to high praise on at least three continents, and have garnered her a prestigious Windham-Campbell Prize along the way, among other honors. This appearance is occasioned by the U.S. publication of a bracing, soaring new novel, A Girl is a Body of Water (Tin House). Called a ‘mesmerizing feminist epic,’ by O Magazine, A Girl is a Body of Water has at its considerable heart the story of a girl who seeks to find and know a mother who has gone missing from her life since infancy. “Makumbi’s prose is irresistible and poignant, with remarkable wit, heart and charm—poetic and nuanced, brilliant and sly, openhearted and cunning, balancing discordant truths in wise ruminations. A Girl Is a Body of Water rewards the reader with one of the most outstanding heroines and the incredible honor of journeying by her side.” —The New York Times Book Review. “A Girl is a Body of Water is captivating, wise, humorous and tender: Makumbi has come back stronger than ever. This is a tale about Kirabo and her family, and her place in the world as she searches for her mother and a true sense of belonging. But most of all, this is a book about the stories that define us, and those we tell to redefine ourselves. A riveting read.”—Maaza Mengiste. Event Registration  
 

10/17/2020 - 7:00pm

Virtual Event
Seattle Reads: Tommy Orange
Virtual Event
Months after it was originally scheduled to be live and in-person in the spring, Seattle Reads presents Cheyenne/Arapaho writer Tommy Orange’s beautiful debut novel, There There (Vintage), in virtual ‘there’ form. Recipient of the PEN/Hemingway Award, cited for many Best Book of Year lists, and a book that has never stopped going into readers’ hands, ever since it was released, this story of twelve people coming to participate in the big Oakland Powwow tellingly brings together many strands of urban Native life. “There There is a miraculous achievement, a book that wields ferocious honesty and originality in service of telling a story that needs to be told. This is a novel about what it means to inhabit a land both yours and stolen from you, to simultaneously contend with the weight of belonging and unbelonging.” —Omar El Akkad. “Welcome to a brilliant and generous artist who has already enlarged the landscape of American Fiction. There There is a comic vision haunted  by profound sadness. Tommy Orange is a new writer with an old heart.” —Louise Erdrich. Presented by The Seattle Public Library and The Seattle Public Library Foundation. As of late September the online spaces for this are full.   More info  
 
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10/18/2020 - 11:00am

Virtual Event
Philip Norman
Virtual Event
Sunday morning brings this program to Seattle from London, where noted rock musician biographer Philip Norman lives. The author of books on such figures as Eric Clapton, Buddy Holly, the Rolling Stones, John Lennon, Elton John, Mick Jagger, and Paul McCartney, he will this morning be talking about his newest book, one dear and close to Seattle’s heart, as it is Wild Thing: The Short, Spellbinding Life of Jimi Hendrix (Liveright). “As a biography of the legendary ax man, this is the one. There will be much interest in all things Hendrix on the 50th anniversary of his death this September. As his chronicler, Norman is, most definitely, experienced. Essential for music collections and anyone interested in Hendrix or music of the 1960s.” - Library Journal. “In this rollicking biography, Norman follows the electric guitar god from hardscrabble Seattle boyhood to enormous fame and his 1970 martyrdom to rock-star excess. . . . Norman combines colorful, energetic picaresque [with] lush evocations of Hendrix’s sound. . . . Norman’s entertaining, psychedelically tinged portrait shows why Hendrix made such a deep impression on rock ’n’ roll.” - Publishers Weekly. Presented by Town Hall Arts & Culture in partnership with Elliott Bay Book Company.   Event registration  
 

10/19/2020 - 7:00pm

Virtual Event
John Marzluff
Virtual Event
Yes, the birds. Meadowlarks are a bird more known over the mountains east of here - the state bird for some of us that are from prairie states. They play, as acclaimed author of numerous bird books and professor of environmental and forest sciences John Marzluff knows, an important part in the relationship with food and agriculture wherein the two meet. This, and more, John Marzluff writes of in his new book, In Search of Meadowlarks: Birds, Farm and Food in Harmony with the Land (Yale University Press). "John Marzluff's In Search of Meadowlarks is an epic look at the deep connections between us, the birds we love best, and our food supply. It's a  rich tapestry of meadowlarks and farmers, crows and cows, science and story. If you love songbirds, enjoy a great read, or eat food, you really need to read this book."—Sy Montgomery. "An eloquent, science-based perspective on how meadowlarks and cows, owls and vineyards, and other wildlife and agricultural practices can co-exist and provide abundant and healthy food.  A must-read for everyone.”—Bernd Heinrich. Some of John Marzluff’s other books (which include collaborations with Tony Angell) are In the Company of Crows and Ravens, Gifts of the Crow, and Subirdia.    Event Registration  
 

10/19/2020 - 7:30pm

Virtual Event
Jennifer Haupt & Friends
Virtual Event
In response to the pandemic, Seattle writer (the novel In the Shadow of 10,000 Hills) Jennifer Haupt did something very few were doing - bring people together. Specifically, she brought 90 writers together in virtual and written form to create an anthology which both speaks to the pandemic and also serves as a fundraiser to bookstores and booksellers in need, via the Book Industry Charitable Foundation (BINC). Alone Together: Love, Grief, and Comfort in the Time of Covid-19 (Central Avenue Publishing) is that anthology, which includes pieces by an incredible array of well-known and soon-to-be-known writers - Kwame Alexander, Jenna Blum, Andre Dubus III, Jamie Ford, Nikki Giovanni, Jane Hirshfield, Pam Houston, Jean Kwok, Major Jackson, Caroline Leavitt, Ada Limón, Dani Shapiro, David Sheff, Garth Stein, Steve Yarbrough, and Lidia Yuknavitch among them. Tonight's speakers are Lidia Yuknavitch, Claudia Castro Luna, and Amber Flame, along with Jennifer Haupt herself (bless her, bless all involved). They will share readings from the book, and engage in a panel discussion moderated by KUOW’s Zaki Hamid to explore the importance of creativity and resistance in this moment. For anyone who has been feeling the isolation keenly, we invite you to this conversation as a lifeline for negotiating how to connect and thrive during this time. “These are powerful messages of unity and hope in a time of isolation and despair. Alone Together is a very important work that has emerged from a very dark time.” —  Kevin O’Brien. “Jennifer Haupt’s timely and moving anthology also benefits the Book Industry Charitable Foundation, making it a project that is noble in both word and deed.” — Ann Patchett. For more on BINC, please see www.bincfoundation.org. Presented by Town Hall Arts & Culture in partnership with Elliott Bay Book Company.   Event registration  
 

10/20/2020 - 7:00pm

Virtual Event
Lindy West
Virtual Event
Yes, yes, yes. Two weeks before this election. We need a dose of ‘something else,’ even for just an hour or so. Here, virtually, to oblige, is the inimitable Lindy West, with her newest, Shit, Actually: The Definitive 100% Objective Guide to Modern Cinema (Hachette). That title and it is not about the election, it really is about movies. The author of Shrill and The Witches Are Coming here returns to her journalistic roots, where she reviewed films for The Stranger. This is a re-viewing of many iconic and many less-so films of the past forty years.  "It's annoying how many good, funny, and laser-precise books Lindy has written. Here's another damn great book! It's the opposite of shit, actually."— Aidy Bryant. “Two thumbs up.” - Samantha Irby. Tickets ($35) include a copy of Shit, Actually.  Presented by Elliott Bay Book Company. Event registration
 

10/20/2020 - 7:00pm

Virtual Event
Jill "tsi sqʷux̌ʷaʔł" La Pointe and Sasha "taqʷšəblu" La Pointe
Virtual Event
Part of the Seattle Reads There There programming includes this much-anticipated program with Jill tsisqʷux̌ʷał La Pointe, director of the Lushootseed Research Foundation and poet Sasha "taqʷšəblu" La Pointe. They are, respectively, also granddaughter and great-granddaughter of beloved Upper Skagit tribal elder Vi taqʷšəblu Hilbert, on the occasion of a new, second edition of taqʷšəblu’s essential Haboo: Native American Stories from Puget Sound (University of Washington Press). Taqʷšəblu told stories from this book’s original edition  and other compilations of stories collected from local elders on numerous memorable occasions in Elliott Bay’s original Pioneer Square (or Sdzidzilalitch, “Little Crossing Over Place”) location. For many years, she kindly consented to come close out a year’s programs with stories, as kind of benediction on the year, the gifts we are given and too seldom acknowledge. Haboo has over thirty tales in it, set in this part of the world, but at a time where this world wasn’t known in these ways. Much more in these stories has sentience and relationship than is generally the case with stories written or told by others who have come from elsewhere. More on the vital work of the Lustshoodseed Research Foundation can be found at www.lushootseedresearch.org. Also to say that Sasha La Pointe has a book of her own poems, Rose Quartz, forthcoming from Milkweed Editions. Presented by The Seattle Public Library, Lushootseed Research Foundation, and University of Washington Press in partnership with Elliott Bay Book Company. Event Registration    
 

10/21/2020 - 12:30pm

Virtual Event
Always Indigenous presents Joy Harjo with Tracy Rector
Virtual Event
As part of the October 19-23 celebration, Always Indigenous: Fifty Years of the Chief Seattle Club, esteemed poet, musician, scholar and present esteemed U.S. Poet Laureate Joy Harjo virtually visits during this special lunchtime benefit program to read and discuss her work. The Mvskoke/Creek Nation author of eight books of poetry, an extraordinary memoir (Crazy Brave), and now the editor of a landmark anthology, Joy Harjo has traveled many times to Seattle and throughout the world, reading poetry, performing, as well, with a band. She is the first Native American poet to serve as U.S. Poet Laureate. With her in conversation will be Tracy Rector, the  Seattle-based Choctaw/Seminole filmmaker, activist, and director of Longhouse Media, which will also include audience q&a. Joy Harjo’s most recent book of poems is An American Sunrise (W.W. Norton). “[A] resplendent and reverberating new volume.… Harjo’s bracing political perspective is matched by timeless wisdom.… In clarion, incantatory poems that recalibrate heart and mind, Harjo conveys both the endless ripples of loss and the brightening beauty and hope of the sunrise.” - Maya Phillips, The New Yorker. More recently, there is now this encompassing epic anthology, When The Light of the World Was Subdued, Our Songs Came Through: A Norton Anthology of Native Nations Poetry (W.W. Norton). Leanne Howe and Jennifer Elise Foerster, along with others, helped shape and edit this amazing work, which includes poets of earlier times, some in indigenous languages, and a good number of poets from this part of the continent. This should be something. Presented as part of Always Indigenous, a five-day (October 19-23) celebration honoring the fiftieth anniversary of the Chief Seattle Club.   Event registration  
 

10/21/2020 - 7:30pm

Virtual Event
Kathleen Flenniken with Sharon Bryan
Virtual Event
A poet we have had the pleasure of hosting many times at Elliott Bay, as poet, as Washington State Poet Laureate, and as an editor with Floating Bridge Press, it’s always a welcome evening when Seattle poet Kathleen Flenniken reads, this even the more so as it’s with a new collection of poems, Post Romantic (University of Washington Press). This third collection by a poet whose prizes include the Washington State Book Award and the Prairie Schooner BookPrize, with other honors and distinctions along the way, covers a lot of terrain, doing so beautifully. “The surface range of Kathleen Flenniken’s new community of poems is admirably vast ... The poet’s 'post-romantic' sensibility hovers over all of these poems, many of which track love from its giddy flowering, through its many disappointments and hibernations, to a late, mature moment ... And always …  we find those Flenniken lines that allow the language of poetry to snap into existence out of the language of blah: 'the patience of a low place in the land / waiting to become a sea.'” - Albert Goldbarth. “Flenniken’s ambition is fully realized as she skillfully enlists a variety of innovative forms and voices. The result is stunning. Post Romantic is both a product of and a gift for challenging times. If poetry can sustain us—and I believe it can—this collection is a lifesaver.” - Holly J. Hughes. Presented by Town Hall Arts & Culture in partnership with Elliott Bay Book Company. Event registration  
 
 

10/23/2020 - 7:00pm

Virtual Event
Alicia Garza
Virtual Event
How to actually change things in a lasting, sustained way takes knowing and acting in the moment, but also study, intention, learning, communicating, and working with others. Five years ago, writing a social media post in response to the acquittal of Trayvon Martin’s murderer, evoked a global response. Alicia Garza, with two other women, began what would become known then and since as #BlackLivesMatter, a force that’s been unique in all this country’s history where injustice is concerned, and how that is contested. Alicia Garza today is the principal at the Black Futures Lab (www.blackfutureslab.org) and the Black to the Future Action Fund (www.black2thefuture.org), is director of strategy and partnerships at the National Domestic Workers Alliance, and host of the Lady Don’t Take No podcast. She is also author of one of the vital, necessary books of this time - and beyond - The Purpose of Power: How We Come Together When We Fall Apart (One World). “‘Black lives matter’ was Alicia Garza’s love letter read around the world. The Purpose of Power is another love letter that should be read around the world. It speaks to all that molded Garza, all that molds organizers, all that molds movements.”—Ibram X. Kendi. “I can think of no greater guide to the difficult work of building movements than Alicia Garza and no greater tome of wisdom for this age than The Purpose of Power, a precious offering to a nation navigating unprecedented crises, for whom movements remain our only saving grace.”—Ai-jen Poo.   Co-presented by Langston (www.langstonseattle.org), the Northwest African American Museum (www.naamnw.org), and Elliott Bay Book Company. Tickets are $35 (including a copy of The Purpose of Power, mailed to you within the Continental U.S.) and $10 (event only). A portion of the ticket proceeds will be donated to Langston and the Northwest African American Museum. Please note: If you plan on joining the program from outside the Continental U.S., please purchase a General Admission ticket. Copies of the book to be shipped outside the Continental U.S. must be ordered separately from the Elliott Bay Book Company's website (www.elliottbaybook.com) as shipping charges apply. Event registration  
 
 
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10/25/2020 - 6:00pm

Virtual Event
Jess Walter with Timothy Egan
Virtual Event
From over the Cascades in Spokane - but this time without having to leave Spokane to be with us, novelist Jess Walter will regale readers by virtual means this evening, reading from and talking about his captivating new novel, The Cold Millions (Harper). For this, he’ll be joined in conversation by Spokane native son Timothy Egan, longtime newspaper scribe (Jess Walter has that in him, also), and award-winning author of numerous books, most recently A Pilgrimage to Eternity. Set early last century - a century many of us remember well - though this, even before then, The Cold Millions tells the story of two brothers caught up in the big economic and social changes taking place then.  “Superb…. a splendid postmodern rendition of the social realist novels of the 1930s by Henry Roth, John Steinbeck, and John Dos Passos, updated with strong female characters and executed with pristine prose. This could well be Walter’s best work yet.” -Publishers Weekly. “The Cold Millions is a literary unicorn: a book about socio-economic disparity that’s also a page-turner, a postmodern experiment that reads like a potboiler, and a beautiful, lyric hymn to the power of social unrest in American history. It’s funny and harrowing, sweet and violent, innocent and experienced; it walks a dozen tightropes. Jess Walter is a national treasure.” -Anthony Doerr.   Presented by Elliott Bay Book Company. Tickets ($35) include a copy of The Cold Millions to be shipped within the continental U.S. Event registration  
 
 

10/27/2020 - 6:00pm

Virtual Event
Andrea Rosenberg with Nicole Rudick
Virtual Event
Translator Andrea Rosenberg reads and speaks about Difficult Light (Archipelago), her translation of Tomás González’ 2011 novel, La luz difícil. From one of Colombia's greatest contemporary novelists, Difficult Light is a formally daring meditation on grief, written in candid, arresting prose. "González's last two novels, Difficult Light and The Storm were both hailed as quiet masterpieces at the time of their publication in Colombia... Through all his work you find the peaceful writing that admirably traces the ugliness of the world; the confidence of the narrative voice, seemingly conventional while eschewing the straitjackets of realism... He has a mysterious ability to uplift the commonplace and turn it into unforgettable images through careful observation and sensuous detail." — Juan Gabriel Vásquez, The Guardian.   Andrea Rosenberg is a translator from the Spanish and Portuguese and an editor of the Buenos Aires Review. Among her recent and forthcoming full-length translations are Inês Pedrosa's In Your Hands, Aura Xilonen's The Gringo Champion, Juan Gómez Bárcena's The Sky over Lima, and David Jiménez's Children of the Monsoon. She appears in conversation with writer and editor Nicole Rudick, who for eight years served as the managing editor at The Paris Review.   Event registration  
 
 
 

10/30/2020 - 6:00pm

Virtual Event
Bill Clegg with Kira Jane Buxton
Virtual Event
Allowing for the fact that the day after this will be a first-ever pandemic Halloween, we believe that this evening’s program with novelist (and literary agent) Bill Clegg for his excellent new novel, The End of the Day (Gallery/Scout Press) will mark the end of this active October of virtual author productions. This, with us days away from the utter reality of an election any of us have ever known. Reading this book - and paying heed to Bill Clegg and his partner in conversation this evening, Seattle writer Kira Jane Buxton, author of the novel, Hollow Kingdom - should be a good way to move from work week to weekend. Bill Clegg, who was actually in Elliott Bay to read for his well-received debut novel, Did You Ever Have a Family?, is a consummate storyteller. "In his utterly absorbing and socially trenchant novel, Bill Clegg’s vision is both intimate and grand. He paints precise and unerring portraits of his characters and the dynamics of class that inform their lives while at the same time asking sweeping and urgent questions: What is fate? What responsibilities do we bear for the way in which our actions and our passions alter the course of one another’s lives? The novel’s shattering resonance emerges from its masterful construction. Clegg leads us, and his characters, toward the discovery of long-buried secrets at the same time that he shows us that the facts of a life do not always add up to the truth."– Marisa Silver. “A mesmerizing book about family and memory and friendship and the long arc of life. I've loved every book by Bill Clegg, but The End of the Day might be my favorite because these characters, these quietly remarkable women, remind me of the epic lives hidden within all of us. Reading it is like studying a stained-glass window up close, each piece bright and sharply cut, but when you step back and see it as a whole you discover a large, beautiful, mysterious work of art.”– David Ebershoff.   Event registration  
 
 
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