September 2021

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09/01/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Kira Jane Buxton with Rosemary Mosco
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
We help celebrate the release of Seattle author Kira Jane Buxton’s delightfully ‘animated’ new novel, Feral Creatures (Grand Central) with this virtual launch. Feral Creatures picks up where her lauded debut novel, Hollow Kingdom (finalist for Audie and Washington State Book Awards) left off, here again with intrepid crow S.T., intrepid as only crows can be, at the front and center. "Buxton balances the snarky humor and moving tenderness of her delightful protagonist with genuine tension. Fans of post-apocalyptic dangers and witty narration will eat up this charming story."—Publishers Weekly. "Readers who fell in love with Hollow Kingdom will not be disappointed by book two . . . S.T.’s struggles [are] both humorous and heart-wrenching in this powerful follow-up."—Buzzfeed. This S.T. is the same of whom Helen Macdonald noted, writing of Hollow Kingdom, "S.T., the irrepressible, cursing crow is my new favorite apocalyptic hero." For this evening, Kira Jane Buxton will be joined by Rosemary Mosco, a science writer, naturalist, and author of several comic books featuring birds and other worldly wonders. Her books include Birding Is My Favorite Video Game and the forthcoming A Pocket Guide to Pigeon Watching (Workman, due in November).   Event Registration  
 
 
 
 
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09/07/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Susan Nguyen with Cathy Linh Che
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Back to it we go, after the Labor Day weekend, with this virtual poetry reading by Susan Nguyen with her award-winning debut collection, Dear Diaspora (University of Nebraska Press). Recipient of the Raz/Shumaker Prairie Schooner Book Prize, this is a powerful chronicle of reckoning with personal and collective pasts, ongoing trauma, being part of refugee diaspora. “Last night I had the American dream,’ Nguyen writes, puncturing the dream bubble in which ‘America’ exists as the only and inevitable state of success and belonging. In this collection, diaspora, specifically Vietnamese diaspora, is verdant and lush—suffused with green light, mustard greens, grass and trees—blooming through the drought of American love for Nguyen’s speakers. The poems in Dear Diaspora offer us a lexicon we’ve needed to imagine how we might arrive at and receive one another better in land and language, in memory and touch.”—Natalie Diaz. “Dear Diaspora is a capacious and wholly felt account of a speaker’s contending with place and memory. Susan Nguyen’s gorgeous book maps out the longing of a particular Vietnamese immigrant experience—in its main character, the adolescent Suzi—and also captures, through its documentary research, a collection of voices of Vietnam War refugees in the aftermath. Against a backdrop of love and desire is the search to knit together a place of belonging and origin, rooted both in the sensual world and in the realm of the imagination. Dear Diaspora is a heartbreaking and breathtaking debut.”—Cathy Linh Che. This same Cathy Linh Che, author of the award-winning poetry collection, Split, and executive director of Kundiman, will join Susan Nguyen in conversation this evening. Event Registration  
 

09/08/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Paula Becker with Carol Smith
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Seattle author and historian Paula Becker, a writer who works of history include Looking for Betty MacDonald, the co-authored books The Future Remembered and Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition, and over three hundred essays on www.HistoryLink.org, follows her powerful recent book of a more personal history, A House on Stilts: Mothering in the Age of Opioid Addiction with a handbook for those going through early stages of grief. A Little Book of Self-Care for Those Who Grieve (Girl Friday Books) is a book that gently meets readers at the most disoriented and uncertain parts of the country of grief and mourning, illustrations by artist Rebekah Nichols complementing the text.  “A House on Stilts is the story of a family just like yours perhaps, or the family next door. Through raw and authentic expression, we come to share in this mother’s loss of dreams for her addicted son. Paula Becker deftly shows how addiction can happen to anyone.”—D’Anne Burwell. Paula Becker will be joined in conversation with Seattle journalist and author Carol Smith, herself the author of a recent powerful memoir of grief, Crossing the River: Seven Stories That Saved My Life. Carol Smith is an award-winning journalist and editor for NPR affiliate KUOW Public Radio in Seattle. She has been a PEN Literary Finalist for her journalism, is a seven-time Pulitzer Prize nominee and was recently named Editor of the Year by Public Media Journalists Association. Event Registration  
 

09/08/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Town Hall Seattle
Thom Hartmann
Virtually Hosted by Town Hall Seattle
Fervently followed radio show host and author Thom Hartmann holds forth on Town Hall Seattle’s virtual stage this evening with his newest installment in his Hidden History Series, now numbering (we believe) six titles, the newest being The Hidden History of American Healthcare: Why Sickness Bankrupts You and Makes Others Insanely Rich  (Berrett-Koehler). “This book is a must-read to understand the history of America’s healthcare up to the present-day COVID pandemic. Hartmann vividly exposes the forces opposing universal health care, specifically insurance companies and the AMA, as well as overt racism and deep fears of socialism.” —Justin A. Frank, MD. “Thom Hartmann’s latest book is a must-read for everyone who wants the United States to join the rest of the world and provide healthcare as a human right through the enactment of Medicare for All.” —Nancy J. Altman. Presented by Town Hall Civics in partnership with Elliott Bay Book Company. Event Registration  
 

09/08/2021 - 7:00pm

Pre-recorded for YouTube streaming
Carla Power with Shannon Foley Martinez
Pre-recorded for YouTube streaming
Time zones and busy schedules dictate this much-anticipated program with England-based journalist and author Carla Power be pre-recorded, streamed this evening on our Facebook channel. A National Book Award and Pulitzer Prize- finalist for her earlier book, If the Oceans Were Ink, she will discuss her all-too-timely new book, Home, Land, Security: Deradicalization and the Journey Back from Extremism (One World). Drawn from extensive research - and worked on from well before the 2020 U.S. elections and January 6, this book looks at the roots of radical political behavior, and how people are working to bring people back from that side of things.  “Deeply reported and ultimately optimistic . . . astounding . . . Power humanizes militant jihadists and offers insights into the forces that push people toward extremism. . . . Interweaving intimate character profiles and in-depth research, this is a nuanced look at a critical yet overlooked front in the fight against extremism.”—Publishers Weekly. “Power’s exceptionally wide-ranging research persuaded her that Americans need to stop thinking about former militants in absolutist terms like ‘good and evil’ and to take a more nuanced approach to fostering their deradicalization and preventing the backsliding that may occur during long imprisonments. . . . This book is full of valuable insights into violent extremism . . . A provocative exploration of the appeal of terrorist groups and how to counter it effectively.”—Kirkus Reviews. Joining Carla Power in conversation will be Shannon Foley Martinez, herself a former violent white supremacist, who now has two decades’ experience working to keep people from finding purpose in extremist ideologies and organizations. The video from this pre-recorded program will go live on the Elliott Bay Book Company YouTube Channel on Wednesday, September 8th at 7 pm Pacific Time and may be viewed after that time. Registration is not necessary, but we encourage you to do so. Event Registration  
 

09/09/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Margaret Randall & Cedar Sigo
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
One year after we virtually hosted a program with one of the enduring political and social justice literary artists at work over the decades, Margaret Randall, along with Cedar Sigo, her for 2020 memoir, I Never Left Home: Poet, Feminist, Revolutionary, we virtually welcome them back, this time each having two new books in hand. For Margaret Randall, the two new books are Out of Violence Into Poetry: Poems 2018 - 2021 (Wings Press) and Thinking About Thinking: Not Quite Essays (Casa Urraca Press). "Out of Violence into Poetry by Margaret Randall represents the height of poetry written in any language in the last hundred years and constitutes the broadest, most generous, penetrating and most profound gamble on the part of an extraordinary human being, an extraordinary life and work, on that which we call future. This book—concrete, situated, tangible in its truth and commitment, in its fierce and corrosive irony and public kindness and compassion—creates a fresco that is at once compendium and legacy … Here are the most penetrating and powerful metaphors that a book of poetry can give us in the unending, second-to-second struggle that millions of people across the face of the earth wage in order to become fully human and continue to be so. Only a great poet, a poet of Margaret Randall's magnitude, could title her book Out of Violence into Poetry and include in it one of the most moving poems I have had the privilege of reading: 'I Celebrate.' No one who reads or writes will be able to diminish this poetic triumph. As with all great works, no one could have imagined something like it could have been written. And yet it was. Thank you, Margaret Randall." —Raul Zurita. “Discerning and deeply humane, these essays from international award-winning poet, activist, author Margaret Randall are gems of wisdom, originality, and vision, challenging us to rethink the very process of thought itself. Distilled with age and her wide-ranging art and activism over the course of eight decades, these pieces are quintessential Randall: profound, moving, unforgettable.”— Minrose Gwin. For Cedar Sigo, who hails from the Suquamish Reservation - and lives in nearby Lofall - this welcome Elliott Bay return includes two new releases from Seattle’s Wave Books. Recently released is a book drawn from his giving lectures in the Bagley Wright Series on poetics, Guard the Mysteries.  “Guard the Mysteries is a collection of five talks given by poet Cedar Sigo for the Bagley Wright Lecture Series in 2019. His scope is broad, considering everything from poetry’s potential as a revolutionary force to concepts of identity, personal and shared histories, and the life and work of poets who have been influential in his practice. But “lectures” would be too reductive of a word for what Sigo has accomplished. Each talk works in dialogue with the others, oscillating fluidly between different themes and ideas, rhythmically building towards a satisfying culmination. The lectures, presented over several months, achieve an orchestral resonance when read consecutively. Sigo touches the heart of what it means to not only be a poet, but to be living. That is not to say these talks lose themselves in abstract, ethereal concepts—they are teeming with interesting anecdotes about key figures in America’s literary and activist history, and are firmly grounded in the real world. Writers and readers alike will find this work enriching and informative…” - Alex Kapsidelis, Columbia Journal. We’re also hoping to have in hand a hot-off-the-presses new collection of poems, All This Time. Event Registration  
 

09/09/2021 - 7:30pm

Virtually Hosted by Town Hall Seattle
Suchitra Vijayan
Virtually Hosted by Town Hall Seattle
Town Hall does an in-person hosting of this appearance by journalist, barrister (by training), and activist Suchitra Vijyan for her timely first book, Midnight’s Borders: A People’s History of Modern India (Melville House). Drawn from seven years of research, and travels the breadth and length of India and its borders (many contested), this book offers readers here the fullest telling yet of what India is and has become. “An essential, beautifully written report from the hellish margins of a modern mega-state struggling to be a nation, of people whose lives continue to be shaped by violent political marches across age-old homes and habitats. A memorable, humane ‘museum of forgotten stories’ that we must all read and remember.”—Mirza Waheed. “An intervention like no other when it comes to thinking through not just the history of India but for reflections on borders, migration, the elusory nature of nations. With sharp political analyses, dense historical research, and lyrical, image-rich prose, Vijayan’s journalism displays an inspiring ethic, one that is invested in the micro-histories of the ‘small man,’ the one existing on the fringes of history and the one that most requires urgent representation.”—Bhakti Shringarpure. Presented by Town Hall Civics in partnership with Elliott Bay Book Company. Town Hall Seattle is at 1119 Eighth Avenue (at Seneca). Event Registration  
 

09/10/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Margo Tamez & Diane Glancy
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
This evening’s reading, virtually happening on Duwamish land in Coastal Salish country, brings together two esteemed poets and writers, Dene Ndé poet, historian, activist, and professor of Indigenous Studies at the University of British Columbia Margo Tamez, and prolific Cheyenne/European descent poet, fiction writer, essayist, playwright and emerita professor at Macalester College Diane Glancy - each with new books from Turtle Point Press. Margo Tamez will be here with her newest book of poetry, Father / Genocide. "Father / Genocide is a chef-d’oeuvre that transcends time, borders, space and individual personality to exalt the resilience and strength of Tamez’s people, the Dene Ndé (Lipan Apache). In this stunning new work, Margo defies the limitations of two-dimensional printed media to take readers on an experiential journey into a culture and cosmovision that rebuffs imposed geopolitical limitations and facile, erroneous renditions of its history."—Darrel McLeod. Diane Glancy, author of over sixty books, is virtually here with her newest, A Line of Driftwood: The Ada Blackjack Story. “The shifting of ice. Written letters become elk, an orange is a moon, an owl is a blank page, and the stunning survival in this Arctic landscape redefines the question, “What is rescue?” Diane Glancy hears the spirits, the words beneath the words. She knows the language of scars as she honors the life of Ada Blackjack in this visionary telling of the moving world.” —Jan Beatty. Event Registration  
 
 
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09/12/2021 - 3:00pm

Virtually Hosted by the Northwest African American Museum
Jewell Parker Rhodes with Brandy Colbert
Virtually Hosted by the Northwest African American Museum
One of these days (hopefully), Seattle audiences will get to see in-person one of the most esteemed writers of books for younger readers, and adults as well, a writer who now calls Seattle home, Jewell Parker Rhodes. We’re still at the virtual stage of things, and so it will be for what should be a delightful program hosted by our friends and collaborators at the Northwest African American Museum, as she helps launch her newest book, Paradise on Fire (Little, Brown Books for Young Readers), with actual release date on Tuesday the 14th. This story for middle-aged readers  is a powerful tale of climate change, class, race, and survival in the face of a forest fire. Jewell Parker Rhodes is the author of numerous award-winning children’s books - and adult books, as well. Her most recent program with us was for the reissue of her novel about the Tulsa Race Massacre of 1921, Magic City. She is also the Virginia G. Piper Endowed Chair of Creative Writing at Arizona State University. Joining Jewell Parker Rhodes in conversation for this Sunday program will be noted children’s book author Brandy Colbert, who also teaches in Hamline University’s MFA writing program for children’s and young adult writing, and who has a new young adult book on the Tulsa Race Massacre of 1921, Black Birds in the Sky (Balzer + Bray) due out on October 5. Event Registration  
 

09/13/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Achy Obejas with M. Evelina Galang
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
A Cuban American poet, writer, and translator who has been doing virtuoso work for almost thirty years now, writing and translating extraordinary books and claiming important sexual and cultural terrain as well, Achy Obejas makes this welcome Elliott Bay return, albeit virtually, to read from her new, bilingual collection of poetry, Boomerang / Bumerán (Raised Voices/Voces Alzadas/Beacon Press). “Achy Obejas’s Boomerang comes hurtling at you, maddening, sharp-edged, in wild, aerodynamic swerve across a ‘jeweled sea, flickering with caution,’ flung past limits of language, tragedy, history, to circle back through Ana Mendieta, José Martí, a synagogue in Pittsburgh . . . . There are far more than two sides to the dualities this work takes aim at with shattering skill.”—Esther Allen. “The much-needed hope that comes with love defines these poems, shapes their lush epiphanies, their celebration of beloveds of all sorts, not just humans but also political convictions and the wide ranging geographies of various cities. These are the poems that we need so much right now as they remind us about the transformative promise that manifests when we brush up against each other and the inclusive, generous world that can come out of those moments.”—Juliana Spahr. In conversation this evening with Achy Obejas will be Filipina American fiction writer and professor (University of Miami) M. Evelina Galang, whose most recent book is a  powerful nonfiction work of testimony, Lolas’ House: Filipino Women Living with War. Event Registration  
 

09/14/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Yoon Choi with Adam Johnson
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Virtually joining us, we believe, from her southern California home, is Yoon Choi with her extraordinary debut book of stories, Skinship (Knopf). These stories focusing on different Korean American families and different entrees into U.S. life, are surprising and startling, the seeming small universe of a ‘story’ writ large in almost novelistic terms in these pieces. “Yoon Choi writes with astounding precision and grace. These stories are filled with unflinching moments, so raw yet so true to life. The American experience is encapsulated here and imbued with a rare freshness. I was enthralled not only by the families, parents, and children of Choi’s masterful creation but also by the courage and strength I found on the page.” —Weike Wang. “Yoon Choi’s beautiful debut story collection bring[s] a rich and engaging new voice to contemporary American letters. With refreshing amplitude, patience, and (dare I say) wisdom, Choi’s stories explore the complexities of her characters’ diverse experiences . . . In each story, Choi evokes a world entire . . .” —Claire Messud, Harper’s. “To encounter these achingly truthful, beautiful stories of newcomer Americans is like gazing up at the starry vault of a perfect night sky; it’s immediately dazzling and impressive, and yet the closer and deeper you look, the more you appreciate the sheer countless brilliance.” —Chang-rae Lee. Joining Yoon Choi for this evening will be National Book Award- and Pulitzer Prize-winning author Adam Johnson, whose books include The Orphan Master’s Son and, most recently, Fortune Smiles. He has received numerous other honors, and is presently professor of creative writing at Stanford University. Event Registration  
 

09/14/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Town Hall Seattle
Giulio Boc­caletti
Virtually Hosted by Town Hall Seattle
London-based Giulio Boccaletti, who has worked as a scholar, consultant, and is presently chief strategy officer and global ambassador for water at The Nature Conservancy, virtually comes to Town Hall to discuss his provocative, compelling new book, Water: A Biography (Pantheon). “Magisterial. Boccaletti has pinned down our complex relationship with our most vital resource. We live, like the ancients, in a hydraulic civilization – one determined to a remarkable degree by where and when we can find water. As he reveals with startling clarity, we face a water crisis as profound as our climate crisis. The fate of the Anthropocene hangs on the fate of water.” —Fred Pearce. “Boccaletti brilliantly traces the history of how human civilization has been shaped by its attempts to control water for economic and societal benefit. As the impacts of climate change become clearer, policymakers the world over would be well-served to recognize water as a public good, respecting the importance of this invaluable, shared resource to our very survival.”—Sally Jewell. Presented by Town Hall Science in partnership with Elliott Bay Book Company. Event registration  
 

09/14/2021 - 7:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Hugo House
Anne Liu Kellor with Joyce Chen
Virtually Hosted by Hugo House
We are delighted to help our friends and neighbors at Hugo House virtually welcome and celebrate the publication of Seattle writer Anne Liu Kellor’s luminous first book, Heart Radical: A Search for Language, Love, and Belonging (She Writes Press). And while the program is virtual, an old school touch should be that we’ll have signed copies of Heart Radicals for those attending, and coming to Elliott Bay. “Through personal and historical recollection and the language of wounding, Heart Radical speaks to land and culture, selfhood and belonging. To live within and without language, to ignore or embrace silence. This memoir is a refuge, a legacy, a heart breathing in one continuous motion.” - E.J. Koh. “Heart Radical gets at the multiple meanings of the heart in word, in practice, in physical and emotional use and evolution. Vivid with sensory experiences, this book offers us the chance to travel not just with Kellor but also within our own interior landscapes to arrive at new and deeper ways of connecting to our hearts' most fervent and secret wishes.” - Khadijah Queen. “Heart Radical is a richly absorbing, deeply moving book about one woman’s search for identity, enlightenment, and connection. It’s also a tender travel memoir that takes the reader on an unforgettable and intimate journey with the author as she grapples with being a twentysomething American in China—the country from which her mother immigrated. I loved this book.” - Cheryl Strayed. Joining Anne Liu Kellor this evening will be Seattle writer Joyce Chen, “a writer, editor, and community builder who draws inspiration from many waterlogged cities,” was a 2019-20 Hugo House fellow and is executive director of The Seventh Wave. Signed books will be available. Please specify “signed copy” when ordering. Presented by Hugo House. event registration  
 

09/14/2021 - 7:30pm

Virtually Hosted by Town Hall Seattle
Rupa Marya and Raj Patel
Virtually Hosted by Town Hall Seattle
Inflamed: Deep Medicine and the Anatomy of Injustice (Farrar, Straus and Giroux) illuminates the hidden relationships between our biological systems and the injustices of our political, social, and economic systems. "Inspired by the work of Frantz Fanon and Michel Foucault, among others, the authors examine the “myriad ways” systemic injustice impacts mind and body under the stress of eugenics, exposure to various kinds of trauma, and medical dehumanization. This is a powerful, knowledgeable, and important work about the dangerous connection between health and societal injustices and how it can be resolved."— Booklist.   Dr. Rupa Marya is an associate professor of medicine at the University of California, San Franciscio, where she practices and teaches internal medicine. She is cofounder of the Do No Harm Coalition, a collective of health workers committed to addressing disease through structural change. Raj Patel is a research professor at the University of Texas at Austin’s Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs, a professor in the university’s department of nutrition, and a research associate at Rhodes University, South Africa.   Event Registration  
 

09/15/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Alison Hawthorne Deming with Kathleen Dean Moore
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
A writer and poet who has covered a lot of ground in her day, both literally and in what she’s written, Alison Hawthorne Deming makes this virtual and welcome return to Elliott Bay to read from and discuss her newest book, A Woven World: On Fashion, Fishermen, and the Sardine Dress (Counterpoint). “Only a daring poet, who happens also to be a superb essayist, would try stitching together two endeavors seemingly so disparate as high-fashion dressmaking and ocean-edge fishing. But Alison Deming succeeds brilliantly. To these twin themes of fish and fashion, she adds threads of family and cultural history stretching from Paris to New York to a Canadian island in the Bay of Fundy, from the mid-nineteenth century to our own day. What binds the book together is her admiration for ‘the maker class,’ people skilled in the use of hand and eye to produce the essentials of life. Deming reminds us that literature is one of those essentials—a truth captured by the word ‘poet,’ whose Greek root means ‘one who makes.’” ––Scott Russell Sanders. “With the skill and care of an artisan poet, Alison Hawthorne Deming’s The Woven World brings us the textures of nearly lost words and the craft that required them. Her tactile exploration of makers from fisherfolk to dressmakers makes me long for the embrace of a hand-sewn garment,  stitched of relationships to land and history, embroidered with story.”  ––Robin Wall Kimmerer. For this, Alison Hawthorne Deming will be joined by a writer of similar latitudes and longitudes, Kathleen Dean Moore, essayist, moral and environmental philosopher, and recently (earlier this year) author of the brilliant Earth’s Wild Music: Celebrating and Defending the Songs of the Natural World (Counterpoint). Event Registration  
 

09/16/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Honorée Fanonne Jeffers with Stacy D. Flood
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
One of our country’s most highly regarded poets - her stunning 2020 collection, The Age of Phillis, received numerous awards and was longlisted for the National Book Award - Honorée Fanonne Jeffers is now about to be well known as a novelist, as she virtually appears here for her magisterial debut novel, The Love Songs of W.E.B. Du Bois (Harper). “A staggering and ambitious saga…. Themes of family, class, higher education, feminism, and colorism yield many rich layers. Readers will be floored." -Publishers Weekly. “From our earliest roots, African and Indigenous, to our present-day realities weighed down by inequity and injustice, Jeffers writes about all of us with such tenderness and deep knowing. Hers is the gorgeous prose one expects from a gifted, accomplished poet, masterful and stunning, as she explores both the bountiful resilience of Black folks and the insidious depravity wrought by white supremacy. These Love Songs make for a frank, feminist, and unforgettable read.” -Deesha Philyaw. “This sweeping, brilliant and beautiful narrative is at once a love song to Black girlhood, family, history, joy, pain… and so much more. In Jeffers's deft hands, the story of race and love in America becomes the great American novel.” -Jacqueline Woodson. Amen to these and all other praises coming to this extraordinary book. Honorée Fanonne Jeffers’ range as a writer in yet another form, the essay, is evidenced in the anthology There’s A Revolution Outside, My Love, for which she was part of an amazing virtual Elliott Bay reading with Claudia Castro Luna and Sasha LaPointe. With Honorée Fanonne Jeffers in conversation tonight will be Seattle writer Stacy D. Flood, also the author of a fabulous recent debut novel, The Salt Fields (a much larger story than it might appear). Event Registration  
 

09/17/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by The Seattle Public Library
Sandra Cisneros with Manuel Muñoz
Virtually Hosted by The Seattle Public Library
Alojado virtualmente por la Biblioteca Pública de Seattle
A singular poet and prose writer who has enlivened evenings at Elliott Bay and elsewhere with her reading visits to Seattle in years past, beloved and much-honored author Sandra Cisneros virtually returns from her present home in San Miguel de Allende to give this bilingual reading from her marvelous new book, Martita, I Remember You / Martita, te recuerdo (Vintage). La edición en español está traducida por Liliana Valenzuela. “In this bilingual edition of Cisneros’s exquisite story (after Puro Amor), a woman relives her time in Paris two decades earlier via a cache of discovered letters. At 20, Corina aspires to become a writer and escape her poor Mexican Chicago family, prompting her to travel to Paris. She meets Marta, from Chile, and Paola, from Italy, and mingles with artists, dancers, and performers… Back in Chicago, she holds onto a photo of herself with Marta and Paola, but swiftly loses touch with them. Decades later, she discovers a letter from Marta sent shortly after she’d left, suggesting they meet in Spain, ‘in case you’re still traveling.’ Corina speaks to Marta in her thoughts and gives the rundown of her life: divorced, remarried, two daughters. Cisneros’s language and rhythm of her prose reverberate with Corina’s longing for her youth and unfulfilled promise. The author’s fans will treasure this.” - Publishers Weekly.  Sandra Cisneros’ many other books include A House of My Own, My Wicked Wicked Ways, The House on Mango Street, La Casa en Mango Street, Caramelo, and Woman Hollering Creek. Joining Sandra Cisneros in conversation will be novelist, short story writer, and University of Arizona professor Manuel Muñoz. His books include the novel, What You See in the Dark, and the story collections, Zigzagger and The Faith Healer of Olive Avenue. Presented by The Seattle Public Library and Elliott Bay Book Company. Presentado por la Biblioteca Pública de Seattle y Elliott Bay Book Company. Event Registration / Información de Registro  
 

09/18/2021 - 12:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Rémy Ngamije with Sarah Ladipo Manyika
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Joining us from afar - Windhoek, Namibia - and not so afar, as Zoom has its virtually intimate ways, is Namibian writer and photographer Rémy Ngamije with his sweeping, captivating debut novel, The Eternal Audience of One (Scout Press). “At once a millennial caper and a loving homage to all that is lost in exile, The Eternal Audience of One is nothing short of brilliant. The humor in this stunning novel will keep you glued, but it is the wisdom – elegiac and mature -- that will keep you mesmerized. Take note world: Rémy Ngamije is that electrifying voice you have been waiting for.” —Maaza Mengiste. “No writing convention is safe in Rémy’s hands, not time, not form, not where a story begins or ends because to tell the story of an idiosyncratic yet strangely coherent and cosmopolitan Africa; where anything can happen, he has to reshape writing itself. And he does so with love, beauty and humor. Reader, please meet the future of African Literature!”—Mukoma Wa Ngugi. “The Eternal Audience of One is laugh-out-loud funny with writing that is sometimes so beautiful that it dances off the page—to a millennial beat—in perfect tempo with its tales of migration, love, loss, and friendship.” —Sarah Ladipo Manyika. Sarah Ladipo Manyika will get to elaborate even more on those comments as she, author most recently of the excellent novel Like a Mule Bringing Ice Cream to the Sun, will join Rémy Ngamije in conversation for this midday (our time) program. Sarah Ladipo Manyika has been highly supportive of other writers, such as here, and also in larger literary support, including serving on Hedgebrook’s board of directors. And to note, re Rémy Ngamije:  he is cofounder and editor-in-chief of Doek! Literary Magazine, Namibia’s first literary magazine. Event Registration  
 
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09/20/2021 - 7:00pm

Pre-recorded for YouTube streaming
Postponed - Clarissa Ward with Lynsey Addario
Pre-recorded for YouTube streaming
**This event has been postponed** A debut author who is well-known to many for her award-winning work as an international television news correspondent, Clarissa Ward was on her way to Seattle a year-and-a-half ago when the pandemic came along and altered pretty much everything, including the initial publication of her extraordinary book, On All Fronts: The Education of a Journalist (Penguin), to say nothing of public, in-person appearances such as was scheduled here. We are grateful that we’re finally able to present her, virtually and pre-recorded (time zones a factor) for the paperback publication of her memoir. This book lets Clarissa Ward really tell stories - in superb, compelling language - that television never allows time or context for.  “On All Fronts is funny, fascinating, heart-breaking and heroic. Clarissa Ward doesn’t just take us to the front lines of the world’s most dangerous places, revealing the pain and pleasure of being a foreign correspondent, she gives us a startling, and often hilarious look, at her own unconventional, almost unimaginable childhood. How did a continent-hopping Eloise, who was banished at ten to a dismal British boarding school, wind up in Beijing as a stand-in for Uma Thurman on a Quentin Tarantino film, and then break into the news business and become one of the great foreign correspondents of our time? Read on… Ward has an extraordinary tale to tell.” —Anderson Cooper. “On All Fronts takes the reader on a riveting journey of storytelling as Ward crisscrosses the globe in a relentless quest to become the acclaimed Chief International Correspondent she is today. From Russia to China to Syria, the reader watches her navigate the most intense of human experiences while finding the tools to stay emotional.”—Lynsey Addario. Lynsey Addario, herself an acclaimed photojournalist, the author of the powerful, excellent books, It’s What I Do: A Photographer’s Life of Love and War and Of Love & War, will join Clarissa Ward for what should be an enlivening conversation.  
 

09/20/2021 - 7:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Seattle University College of Arts and Sciences
Paul H. Kidder
Virtually Hosted by Seattle University College of Arts and Sciences
Seattle University philosophy professor Paul H. Kidder this evening celebrates publication of his newest book, Minoru Yamasaki and the Fragility of Architecture (Routledge) with this virtual presentation. This amply illustrated book is a searching look at Minoru Yamasaki’s life and work, which spanned pivotal moments in both U.S. architectural and national history. Seattle has some interesting history here, as well - including iconic Seattle structures such as the Pacific Science Center, the IBM Building, and Rainier Tower - all with the hand of Minoru Yamasaki and his associates involved. Paul Kidder, PhD. is Professor of Philosophy at Seattle University. He is also the author of Gadamer for Architects. This event will be Live Captioned. Presented by Seattle University College of Arts and Sciences and the Elliott Bay Book Company   Event Registration  
 

09/20/2021 - 7:30pm

Live/In-Person at Town Hall Seattle (and Livestream)
Rob Reich, Mehran Sahami, Jeremy M. Weinstein
Live/In-Person at Town Hall Seattle (and Livestream)
1119 Eighth Ave
Seattle, WA 98101
It is planned that the three co-authors - Rob Reich, Mehran Sahami, and Jeremy M. Weinstein, Stanford professors, all - of the new book, System Error: Where Big Tech Went Wrong and How We Can Reboot (Harper) will all be on hand at ye old Town Hall - 1119 Eighth Avenue - for this live, in-person program. "System Error is a triumph: an analysis of the critical challenges facing our digital society that is as accessible as it is sophisticated. Best of all, the authors offer actual solutions for a reboot that are both timely and feasible." -Anne-Marie Slaughter. "It's not about the obvious villains. This wise, nuanced, quietly brilliant book reveals how technology is reshaping our society and our values in ways that are insidious, hidden—sometimes even from their inventors—and far more fascinating. Anyone who believes this reshaping shouldn't be entrusted to private companies needs to read it. Now." -Larissa MacFarquhar. Presented by Town Hall Science in partnership with Elliott Bay Book Company. Town Hall is at 1119 Eighth Avenue (at Seneca). For tickets/information, including information on livestreaming attendance: Click here.  
 

09/21/2021 - 12:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Densho
Naomi Hirahara with Brian Niiya
Virtually Hosted by Densho
Author Naomi Hirahara will appear in conversation with Densho’s Brian Niiya to discuss her new mystery novel, Clark and Division. Set in 1944 Chicago, Clark and Division follows the story of a young woman searching for the truth about her revered older sister’s death, and brings to focus the struggles of one Japanese American family released from mass incarceration at Manzanar during World War II. Naomi Hirahara and Brian Niiya, who share a decades-long friendship, will talk about the novel as well as Hirahara’s earlier book, Life After Manzanar, their common interest in the immediate post-camp period, and more. If you missed our earlier program with Naomi Hirahara, here’s your chance to hear about the historical underpinnings of her most recent novel.    Event registration  
 

09/21/2021 - 7:00pm

Boon Boona Coffee
Marcus Harrison Green
Boon Boona Coffee
724 S 3rd Street, Ste. C
Renton, WA 98057
Tuesday, September 21 at 7 p.m. :: Live/In-Person at Boon Boona Coffee Wednesday, September 29 at 7:30 p.m. :: Live/In-Person at Town Hall Seattle (and Livestream) These two evenings, noted above, mark the launch of a debut book, by one of the vital, essential journalist voices here in Seattle today, Marcus Harrison Green. The founder/publisher of the South Seattle Emerald and a columnist with the Seattle Times, he has not only put his own writing on the line, but has helped give a forum for others’ voices, with the community paper and through book anthologies such as Emerald Reflections 2: A South Seattle Emerald Anthology and the co-presented ‘Life on the Margins’ podcast. These evenings are occasioned by the publication of Marcus Harrison Green’s own book, Readying to Rise: Essays (VertVolta Press). These autobiographically-driven essays chart Marcus Harrison Green’s growing up Black in a gentrifying Seattle. School,  the police, Black Lives Matter, his grandmother’s lessons, religious faith and not, bipolar disorder, the human condition, and more, are taken on with astute insight, feeling, thought. This is a book readers here have been waiting for. Among Marcus Harrison Green’s honors and awards, is the Seattle Human Rights Commission’s Individual Human Rights Leader Award for 2020. For information on the September 21 program at Boon Boona Coffee, 724 S 3rd St, Renton, WA 98057 (featuring performances by the Bushwick Book Club, Reggie Garrett, Moni Temp and others: Click here. For tickets/information on the September 29 program at Town Hall Seattle, which will include Seattle Times editor Michele Matessa Flores in conversation, and will be both live/in-person and live-streamed: Click here.  
 

09/21/2021 - 7:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Sumana Roy
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
If Sumana Roy is doing this program from Siliguri, India, it will be 7:30 Wednesday morning for her as she gives lucky readers here an introduction to her most extraordinary book, How I Became a Tree (Yale University Press). First published in India four years ago, it has quietly, steadily built a readership there, and wherever readers might encounter it. Now, U.S. readers will have a chance to read one of the most  ardent, poetic, beautifully written books in the present growing grove of books on the rooted, branched, arboreal ones we live amidst. This is a book that navigates the line between what is tree and what is not, and what is human and what is not, adroitly, respectfully, imaginatively. “Sumana Roy has written—grown—a radiant and wondrous book, which roots and branches in complex, provocative ways, helping us recognize trees for the ‘strange strangers’ they are, companion-citizens with which we think and remember, yes, but also alien beings that draw love, hate, indifference, and even lust from us humans.”—Robert Macfarlane. "A poetic, probing meditation on how trees are, to paraphrase Lévi-Strauss, 'good to think with.' Sumana Roy gives us a fresh and surprising look at a topic as old as the Epic of Gilgamesh, or to put it another way, almost as old as the oldest living trees."—Robert Moor. "An ode to all that is unnoticed, ill, neglected and yet resilient. . . . Roy’s true spiritual ancestor . . . is Annie Dillard. . . . Both Roy and Dillard craft remarkable, poignant sentences. Both have the ability to make mundane situations lead up to profound, even apocalyptic consequences.”—Rini Barman, The Wire (India). Singular as this book is, we hope it helps lead to U.S. publication of Sumana Roy’s other excellent books - Missing: A Novel, Out of Syllabus: Poems, and My Mother’s Lover and Other Stories. Event Registration  
 

09/22/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Ruth Ozeki with Karen Joy Fowler
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Along with our bookselling friends and colleagues at Third Place Books here in Seattle and Lake Forest Park, and Village Books in Bellingham, we are thrilled to be presenting this virtual program with Ruth Ozeki for her just-published new novel, The Book of Form and Emptiness (Viking). Ruth Ozeki has been one of our favorite writers and human beings on the planet ever since June 1998 and her first visit to Elliott Bay for her spirited, audacious debut novel, My Year of Meats. She has been back this way every book since - her other novels, All Over Creation, the Booker finalist A Tale for the Time Being, and her autobiographical The Face: A Time Code. This esteemed novelist, filmmaker, Zen Buddhist priest, and creative writing professor is at the height of her powers in this luminous new work. “Ozeki’s illuminating postmodern latest […] explores themes of mourning, madness, and the powers of the imagination . . . Ozeki playfully and successfully breaks the fourth wall […] and she cultivates a striking blend of young adult fiction tropes with complex references to Walter Benjamin, Zen Buddhism, and Marxist philosophy. This is the rare work that will entertain teenagers, literary fiction readers, and academics alike.” —Publishers Weekly. “This compassionate novel of life, love and loss glows in the dark. Its strange, beautiful pages turn themselves. If you’ve lost your way with fiction over the last year or two, let The Book of Form and Emptiness light your way home.” —David Mitchell. “Once again, Ozeki has created a masterpiece. Her generous heart, remarkable imagination, and brilliant mind light up every page.” —Karen Joy Fowler. Karen Joy Fowler, also a favorite of readers hereabouts, most recently author of We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves, will get to expand and elaborate on those comments by engaging with Ruth Ozeki in conversation this evening, one sure to be a delight. This is a virtual event, taking place on Zoom Webinar. Zoom links will be sent out 48 hours before the event. Each ticket includes event access and a signed copy of The Book of Form and Emptiness, shipped to an address within the Continental U.S. via USPS Media Mail. Books will be shipped after the Event. WE ARE NOT ABLE TO OFFER INTERNATIONAL SHIPPING FOR BOOK AND TICKET EVENTS. Co-presented by Third Place Books, Village Books, and Elliott Bay Book Company. Event registration  
 

09/23/2021 - 4:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Flatiron Books/Macmillan Publishing
Tarana Burke National Book Event
Virtually Hosted by Flatiron Books/Macmillan Publishing
Along with other independent bookstores around the country, and Flatiron Books’ An Oprah Book imprint, we are pleased to be helping present this virtual program with Tarana Burke for her new book, Unbound: My Story of Liberation and the Birth of the Me Too Movement. Ms. Burke, a longtime activist, who started the “Me Too” movement that has grown into something worldwide and enduring, here for the first time tells the remarkable story of her journey. "Burke sings a Black girl's song and Unbound stands alongside I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings and The Color Purple, as a coming of age story that is at once searingly painful, brilliant, and beautiful. Tarana Burke is known around the world for her activism and leadership. Now she will be known as an extraordinary writer." —Imani Perry. "Intensely moving and unapologetically frank, Burke’s fearless memoir will uplift and inspire the next generation of survivors, advocates, and truth-tellers." —Publishers Weekly. "Burke's Unbound is worthy of being considered next to I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings as one of those rare books that will unfold and welcome parts of us we thought we'd completely hid until the earth is gone. Unbound is the one we readers and writers have been waiting for." —Kiese Laymon. Tarana Burke will be joined by various guests at the NYC Botanical Gardens. The event will be pretaped to air on September 23rd at 4 pm Pacific Time/7 PM Eastern Time on Zoom Webinar with the author participating in a live audience Q&A during the event. Registration on Eventbrite is required. Tickets are free and when registering for the event, you may also order a copy of Unbound (shipped via Media Mail to addresses in the U.S. only).  Presented by Flatiron Books: An Oprah Book, Elliott Bay Book Company, and numerous independent bookstores around the U.S.   Event registration  
 

09/23/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by The Seattle Public Library
Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz with Mahmood Mamdani
Virtually Hosted by The Seattle Public Library
Renowned historian, scholar, activist Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz makes this very welcome Seattle return, albeit virtually, for this program co-present with The Seattle Public Library, and to include Mahmood Mamdani, himself an esteemed scholar and author, in conversation. Occasioning this program is her major new historical work which couldn’t be more timeless - or timely - Not "A Nation of Immigrants": Settler Colonialism, White Supremacy, and a History of Erasure and Exclusion (Beacon Press). “Not ‘a Nation of Immigrants’ challenges to the core one of the most dominant narratives about the United States, as a country founded by and welcoming for immigrants. Dunbar-Ortiz’s captivating and accessible historical account forces a reckoning with the various layers of the US imperialist project, from territorial control to economic and political influence at the expense of Black populations, migrants, and Indigenous peoples. This myth-shattering book addresses one of the most pressing challenges of our time by demonstrating the implications of White supremacy across time, across groups and spaces, and the connections between them. If there is hope for transformation, it is through the careful, systematic work that this book exemplifies by examining the roots of racism and structural inequality, and bringing forward alternative narratives and movements. It is a must-read.” —Alexandra Délano. “Her thought-work and writing are both full-force with courage and wisdom. In the age of telling truth, she says, the US has yet to correct its narrative to acknowledge its settler-colonialist and imperialist past and present. This book should be taught in classrooms; readers will finish it changed.”—Booklist. “A compelling counter-narrative to America’s autobiography as the making of a ‘nation of immigrants.’ Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz not only chips away at this settler account but also provides the narrative glue for an emancipatory movement beyond the settler-native dichotomy.”—Mahmood Mamdani. Mahmood Mamdani, himself the author of the recent book, Neither Settler Not Native: The Making and Unmaking of Permanent Minorities, for which he gave Elliott Bay readers an excellent presentation, and is Herbert Lehman Professor of Government and Professor of Anthropology and of Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies at Columbia University and Director of the Makerere Institute of Social Research in Kampala, will join Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz in conversation. Event registration  
 

09/24/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Kei Miller
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Forward Prize-winning Jamaican poet, novelist, and essayist Kei Miller, who gave Elliott Bay readers a wonderful reading a few years ago when he visited with his well-received novel,  Augustown, virtually returns this evening to read from and discuss his telling new book of linked essays, Things I Have Withheld (Grove Press). “Jamaican poet and novelist Miller gives a searing voice to ‘the things I have been trying so hard to write’ in this entrancing collection. In 14 essays that code-switch between personas and move from the incisive language of a university professor to Jamaican patois, he vividly depicts the ways colonialism, racism, homophobia, and privilege have shaped his life. As he writes in a letter addressed to the late James Baldwin, ‘there is little between... the set of circumstances you wrote of, and the set of circumstances we live in now’ … Closing with another letter addressing Baldwin, Miller brings into devastating clarity the dangers confronting Black people in visualizing the final moments of Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor, and George Floyd. Sharp as blades, Miller’s words cut to the core.” —Publishers Weekly. “Thoughtful and impassioned… Miller reflects on race, gender, family, language, and, most pointedly, the body… A spirited collection from a significant voice of both fiction and nonfiction.”—Kirkus Reviews. Event Registration  
 

09/25/2021 - 10:00am

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Marwa al-Sabouni
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
We can’t begin to say how delighted, how grateful, how honored we are to finally be able to present a program with author, thinker, architect, Marwa al-Sabouni. If all goes well (In sh’Allah), she will be joining us at this special hour,  virtually and ‘live’ from her home in Homs, Syria to discuss her extraordinary new book, Building for Hope: Towards an Architecture of Belonging (Thames & Hudson). Building for Hope comes five years after Marwa al-Sabouni’s first book, The Battle for Home: The Vision of a Young Architect in Syria, introduced the larger world to a writer uniquely adept at using words to convey ideas from books, book-study, life being fully lived (and wars survived) and from the physical spaces of buildings, streets, land-use patterns that do so much to shape how we live as individuals and as communities and countries. “Ambitious... Building for Hope is expansive, abstract, and at times extraordinarily idealistic... Al-Sabouni argues that architecture is a necessary agent for any kind of peace, any possibility of belonging in our modern, extremely polarized world... It’s especially enlightening to read about Western cities through the lens of an architect specialized in Islamic traditions... Building for Hope is dense and daring. Readers will finish with a list of people and places to investigate, as well as with a firm belief that a better future lies in valuing community over ostentation, coherence and decency over luxury, truly livable cities over places designed purely for profit.” - World-Architects.com. “A gifted writer and illustrator, al-Sabouni's visionary ideas will inspire architects, designers and urban planners across the world.” - Shahina Piyarali , Shelf Awareness. Yes, the illustrations, that language, too. This is one not to be missed. Event Registration  
 

09/25/2021 - 1:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Jackie Kay with Brit Bennett
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
By 2 p.m. Seattle time, a reader/viewer could have themself quite a day - with author Marwa al-Sabouni in Homs, Syria on the cities we live in, followed by esteemed poet/fiction writer Jackie Kay, perhaps in northern England, on the life of blues singer Bessie Smith, to be joined in conversation by Brit Bennett, quite possibly in Los Angeles. This 1 p.m. program we are quite excited to be hosting as it virtually brings one of the UK’s most cherished and accomplished writers in Jackie Kay - who visited Elliott Bay back in the day with her fabulous novel, Trumpet. This time it’s virtual, and it’s for her enthralling study of Bessie Smith, Bessie Smith: A Poet’s Biography of a Blues Legend (Vintage). “Growing up black in an all-white neighbourhood in Glasgow in the Seventies, Jackie Kay (now the national poet of Scotland) found in Bessie Smith an idol, a comfort and a friend. Kay mixes personal reflection and biography, lyrics and prose, to tell the story of how the Empress of the Blues went from an orphan singing for nickels in Tennessee, to selling 780,000 copies of her debut record, to dying in a much-mythologised car crash in 1937, aged 43. The original was published in 1997 but this reprint, with a new introduction by the author, hasn’t dated a day.” —The New Statesman. “Eloquent and emotive. . . . Bessie Smith remains an act of intimate witnessing, a biography about a black, bisexual, working-class American artist by a celebrated Scottish poet who first recognized her own blackness and queerness in Smith’s songs, her wild mythos and ‘beautiful black face.’”—The Guardian. Joining Jackie Kay will be Brit Bennett, she of the acclaimed debut novel, The Mothers, and then last year’s singular, bravura novel, The Vanishing Half - later this year to be The Seattle Public Library’s Seattle Reads selection. Event Registration  
 
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09/27/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Miguel Rivera with Claudia Castro Luna
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
The publication of the poems in the late Guatemalan poet Humberto Ak’abal’s book of poems, published here as In the Courtyard of the Moon (Tia Chucha Press), has been more of a journey than most books. Written by Humberto Ak’abal (1952 - 2019) in K’iché, the poet himself translated the poems into Spanish. We welcome Miguel Rivera, himself originally from Guatemala, an accomplished professional drummer and musician, and teacher, who translated the poems from Spanish, working with Fran Quinn and earlier, Robert Bly, to bring them into English, for this striking book. Humberto Ak’abal was author of several collections, his awards and honors including the Blaise Cendrars International Poetry Award, the Canto de América Prize in Indigenous Literatures, the Pier Paolo Pasolini International Poetry Award and a Chevalier l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres. “Writers like Ak’abal . . . require us to penetrate into that other reality that we do not know, understand that this culture, that this indigenous soul lives and breathes in our own reality at the same time as our time, with the same life as our life, loving and understanding the same continent that we love but do not understand.” —Carlos Montemayor. Making this special evening even more special will be having treasured Seattle poet Claudia Castro Luna as part of the proceedings. Originally from El Salvador, the Americas are very much part of her poetic focus, as evidenced by her collection Killing Marías, and a book of new poems coming from Tia Chucha Press next year. She was Seattle’s first Civic Poet, is the most recent past Washington State Poet Laureate, is also the author of One River, A Thousand Voices, and has an essay not to be missed in There’s A Revolution Outside, My Love. We anticipate this being, in part, at a bilingual reading, as part of what we anticipate being a most spirited evening. Event Registration  
 

09/27/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Town Hall Seattle
Farah Jasmine Griffin
Virtually Hosted by Town Hall Seattle
Town Hall this evening virtually hosts Columbia University professor Farah Jasmine Griffin, who was the inaugural chair of the African American and African Diaspora Studies Department there, and is the author of numerous books, virtually appearing here this evening for her newest, Read Until You Understand: The Profound Wisdom of Black Life and Literature (W.W. Norton). “Farah Jasmine Griffin is one of the few great intellectuals in our time! This wise and powerful memoir is a masterpiece. Griffin beautifully weaves her profound devotion to the life of the mind with her deep and abiding love of Black people and culture. Her magical words enchant and empower us like those of her towering heroes —Toni Morrison, Billie Holiday, James Baldwin, and Wilhelmena Griffin!” - Elizabeth Alexander. “Farah Jasmine Griffin’s vivid, passionate, and powerful tribute to the great gifts of Black culture offers a deep dive into such fundamental human themes as freedom, justice, rage, death, beauty, and love, as lived and celebrated through her own experience, music, and creative art, and that of countless others in the community she embraces, from the legacy of Black history to her own family, her wide explorations of literature and art, and her close friendships with many artists and writers.” - Cornel West. Presented by Town Hall Civics in partnership with Elliott Bay Book Company. event registration  
 

09/28/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Town Hall Seattle
Keith Boykin
Virtually Hosted by Town Hall Seattle
CNN political commentator, Columbia University professor, social justice activist and award-winning (Lambda and others) author Keith Boykin virtually visits Town Hall to discuss his all-too timely new book, Race Against Time: The Politics of a Darkening America (Bold Type Books). “Race Against Time is Keith Boykin’s best book yet in a long list of books and anthologies that have helped define what cultural criticism is. This book is also an account of what it means to be overlooked in a capitalist landscape that denies the existence and contribution of black queer citizens. What floors me is that Boykin’s genius—from all the political and racial history from Reconstruction onward, to his well-wrought recounting of the antics of US presidents from Reagan to Trump—still allows him to remain a man of hope and a writer that affirms the spirit in essays that speak to us as a comforting brother would.” —Jericho Brown. “In evocative fashion, and through the depth of his personal experiences at the highest levels of American politics, Keith Boykin traces the parameters of America’s ‘never-ending civil war,’ from the shock of Clinton’s Black-voter-driven presidency though Bush and Obama and the white nationalist nightmare of Donald Trump. Race Against Time is essential reading at a calamitous time.”—Joy Reid. Presented by Town Hall Civics in partnership with Elliott Bay Book Company. event registration  
 

09/28/2021 - 7:30pm

Live/In-Person at Benaroya Hall and Livestreaming
Anthony Doerr presented by Seattle Arts & Lectures
Live/In-Person at Benaroya Hall and Livestreaming
200 University Street
Seattle, WA 98101
We do remember Anthony Doerr coming over to Elliott Bay from his Boise home to read from his early short-story collections, his first novel, About Grace, and his memoir, Four Seasons in Rome. He is in different territory now in terms of venue, making this planned in-person appearance for his much-anticipated new novel, Cloud Cuckoo Land (Scribner). The anticipation is more than justified. "Doerr demonstrates a singular gift for bringing these complex, fully realized characters to empathetic life in this brilliantly imagined story, which moves backward and forward in time ... One of the joys of reading Cloud Cuckoo Land is discovering the threads that link the five characters’ lives, which ultimately cohere in ways that are simply unforgettable, as is this amazing gift of a novel."—Booklist. “Doerr’s first book since his Pulitzer Prize-winning All the Light We Cannot See and even grander in conception and delivery . . . . [Cloud Cuckoo Land] is a glorious golden mesh of stories that limns the transformative power of literature and our need to both dream big and arrive back home in a world that will eventually flow on without us. Highly recommended.”—Library Journal. Presented by Seattle Arts & Lectures in partnership with Elliott Bay Book Company and other independent bookstores. Benaroya Hall is at 200 University Street. We are planning to be there with books, too!   Event registration  
 

09/29/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Rachel Greeenwald Smith
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Literary critic and scholar - she teaches at Saint Louis University - Rachel Greenwald Smith virtually joins us to discuss her new book, On Compromise: Art, Politics, and the Fate of an American Ideal (Graywolf Press). This book cogently follows her earlier Affect and American Literature in the Age of Neoliberalism in parsing the ways cultural  literary politics dovetail with political politics and vice versa. “Literary critic Smith explores the intersection of compromise, politics, and aesthetic movements in this insightful collection. Most of the essays are grounded in personal experience ... Smith writes of attending the 2017 Women’s March in Washington, D.C., on the day after Donald Trump’s inauguration and feeling as though she had ‘compromised on [her] distrust of mainstream white feminism’ while still appreciating the solidarity she felt. This evolves into a critique of experimental ‘hybrid’ works of contemporary literature, which she views as ‘compromise aesthetics’ that maintains the status quo. In ‘Welcome to the Jungle,’ she considers MFA programs as an exercise  in compromise between the individualism inherent in art and the uniformity of an institution ... Greenwald Smith takes a commendably expansive view of the idea and practice of compromise, creating a nuanced look at a thorny subject. The result is a work of criticism as thoughtful as it is relevant.” - Publishers Weekly. “Teeming with the anarchic energies of the DIY underground, yet wryly unsentimental about the complexities of complicity, Rachel Greenwald Smith’s On Compromise is post-punk in all the best senses of the term.”—Sara Marcus. Event Registration  
 

09/29/2021 - 7:30pm

Live/In-Person at Town Hall Seattle (and livestream)
Marcus Harrison Green with Michele Matessa Flores
Live/In-Person at Town Hall Seattle (and livestream)
1119 Eighth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98101
Wednesday, September 29 at 7:30 p.m. :: Live/In-Person at Town Hall Seattle (and livestream) Tuesday, September 21 at 7 p.m. :: Live/In-Person at Boon Boona Coffee/Renton These two evenings, noted above, mark the launch of a debut book, by one of the vital, essential journalist voices here in Seattle today, Marcus Harrison Green. The founder/publisher of the South Seattle Emerald and a columnist with the Seattle Times, he has not only put his own writing on the line, but has helped give a forum for others’ voices, with the community paper and through book anthologies such as Emerald Reflections 2: A South Seattle Emerald Anthology and the co-presented ‘Life on the Margins’ podcast. These evenings are occasioned by the publication of Marcus Harrison Green’s own book, Readying to Rise: Essays (VertVolta Press). These autobiographically-driven essays chart Marcus Harrison Green’s growing up Black in a gentrifying Seattle. School,  the police, Black Lives Matter, his grandmother’s lessons, religious faith and not, bipolar disorder, the human condition, and more, are taken on with astute insight, feeling, thought. This is a book readers here have been waiting for. Among Marcus Harrison Green’s honors and awards, is the Seattle Human Rights Commission’s Individual Human Rights Leader Award for 2020. Presented by Town Hall Civics in partnership with Elliott Bay Book Company (September 29). Town Hall Seattle is at 1119 Eighth Avenue (at Seneca). For tickets/information on the September 29 program at Town Hall Seattle, which will include Seattle Times editor Michele Matessa Flores in conversation, and will be both live/in-person and live-streamed: click here. For information on the September 21 program at Boon Boona Coffee, 724 S 3rd St in Renton (featuring performances by the Bushwick Book Club, Reggie Garrett, Moni Temp and others: click here.
 

09/30/2021 - 7:00pm

Virtually Hosted by The Seattle Public Library
Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore with EJ Colen, Patrick Milian, Laura LeMoon, and Eddie Walker
Virtually Hosted by The Seattle Public Library
Along with our friends and colleagues at The Seattle Public Library, we close out this eventful, geographically far-flung month of virtual presentations with esteemed Seattle author Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore and a group of contributors to her excellent new anthology, Between Certain Death and a Possible Future: Queer Writing on Growing Up with the AIDS Crisis (Arsenal Pulp). EJ Colen, Patrick Milian, Laura LeMoon, and Eddie Walker should be virtually on hand, from among the great group of contributors to this book, along with Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore herself. “An exciting and important collection that reconvenes community and brings our hidden feelings and experiences of HIV again to light and to consciousness.” -Sarah Schulman. “For decades, Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore has been putting together anthologies that transform the field of queer politics and let us understand ourselves and each other in new ways. Between Certain Death and a Possible Future is just such a book. It is a must-read for this moment, yet another juncture where we face the collision of brutal inequality, right-wing resurgence, and pandemic. This book is deeply personal, moving, and evocative, and at the same time has an enormous amount to teach us about the political and social conditions that have produced the social meanings of AIDS and sex that have shaped our lives." -Dean Spade. Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore’s many other books include the New York Times Editors Choice selection, The Freezer Door; The End of San Francisco; Sketchtasy; and an earlier anthology, Why Are Faggots So Afraid of Faggots?- books which have received numerous awards and award nominations. Presented by The Seattle Public Library and Elliott Bay Book Company. Event Registration  
 
 
 
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