February 2021

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02/01/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Gretel Ehrlich with Frances McCue
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
One of the very first writers to appear at Elliott Bay, Gretel Ehrlich first came to read at the bookstore in 1985. That was when her book, The Solace of Open Spaces, landed like a sudden storm on the high plains, a book of deep insight, impact, and literary power. We knew that book would be ‘around,’ even if we didn’t know if we - still in the early stages of things - would be. Thirty-five years later, many books by Gretel Ehrlich later, The Solace of Open Spaces is still here, going into people’s hands. And Gretel Ehrlich herself is here once again, albeit virtually, with an extraordinary  new book that circles back to that touchstone first book. Unsolaced: Along the Way To All That Is (Viking) chronicles the elements, human and otherwise, that have helped shape her life, wonder, understanding, compassion. Human damage to the planet - climate, land, everything - are at the heart of what she ruminates upon. Through such books as Facing the Wave, The Future of Ice, Heart Mountain, This Cold Heaven, A Match to the Heart, Islands, the Universe, Home, she has been doing this in many parts of the world - as well as in the heart. “Gripping . . . Ehrlich chronicles with enthralling precision the to-the-brink physicality of hard work and daring expeditions and the meditative states nature summons . . . Writing with fire and ice of beauty, risk, and devastation, Ehrlich shares wonder, wisdom, candor, and concern to soul-ringing effect.”—Booklist. “Gretel Ehrlich’s account of her journeys in far flung parts of the natural world have the emotional intensity and scrupulous detail of someone looking for home. Compelled to share her hopes for success, the reader will discover a thrilling, informative, hard won book.”—Thomas McGuane. Joining her in conversation this evening is Seattle  writer, University of Washington professor, former Hugo House director Frances McCue. Her recent books include Timber Curtain and The Car That Brought You Here Still Runs.   Event Registration  
 

02/02/2021 - 7:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Chenxing Han with Sharon A. Suh
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Despite the fact that two thirds of U.S. Buddhists identify as Asian American, mainstream perceptions about what it means to be Buddhist in America often whitewash and invisibilize the diverse, inclusive, and intersectional communities that lie at the heart of American Buddhism. Chenxing Han's book, Be the Refuge (North Atlantic Books) is both critique and celebration, calling out the erasure of Asian American Buddhists while uplifting the complexity and nuance of their authentic stories and vital, thriving communities. Drawn from in-depth interviews with a pan-ethnic, pan-Buddhist group, Be the Refuge is the first book to center young Asian American Buddhists’ own voices. Chenxing Han appears in conversation with Sharon A. Suh, Ph.D., Professor of Theology and Religious Studies at Seattle University. “In this impressive debut, Buddhist chaplain Han offers an illuminating analysis of the intersection of race and privilege within American Buddhist communities.” -Publishers Weekly. “In this vivid and nuanced presentation of Asian American voices, Han offers what many of us have been longing for: young voices grappling in deep and caring ways with one of the central issues of our time: how we might build a more inclusive Buddhist community—one big enough to hold our multiple identities, whether of race, ethnicity, and culture, or of gender and tradition. This book is both impressive and necessary.” —Jan Willis. Chenxing Han is a Bay Area-based writer whose publications have appeared in Buddhadharma, Journal of Global Buddhism, Lion's Roar, Pacific World, Tricycle, and elsewhere.  Co-presented by The Elliott Bay Book Company and Seattle University College of Arts and Sciences.    Event Registration  
 

02/03/2021 - 10:00am

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Closed for Inventory
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
We are closed to the public today while we perform inventory and tidy the salesfloor.     
 

02/03/2021 - 4:00pm

Virtually Hosted by HarperCollins
Charles M. Blow with Bakari Sellers
Virtually Hosted by HarperCollins
Please join us for a special event with Charles Blow, who will speak about his new book, The Devil You Know: A Black Power Manifesto. Acclaimed journalist, New York Times columnist and author Charles Blow never wanted to write a “race book.” But as violence against Black people—both physical and psychological—seemed only to increase in recent years, culminating in the historic pandemic and protests of the summer of 2020, he felt compelled to write a new story for Black Americans. He envisioned a succinct, counterintuitive, and impassioned corrective to the myths that have for too long governed our thinking about race and geography in America. He will appear in conversation with Bakari Sellers. “Charles Blow’s uncommonly specific and clear remedy for overcoming racial injustice in America is provocative, intriguing, innovative, and insightful. You won’t read another contemporary book on race as powerful as this bold work by one of the nation’s most compelling writers.” -Bryan Stevenson. “In his provocative manifesto Charles Blow gives us one of the most thrilling experiences as readers: the challenge of imagining an alternate future. Writing in a long tradition of Black visionaries who’ve wrestled with the political implications of place and power, he exhorts African Americans to reconsider the possibilities of home against an historical backdrop of past migrations. Blow is one of our most penetrating thinkers and brilliant essayists, and in The Devil You Know he is putting it all on the line.”-Henry Louis Gates, Jr. Charles M. Blow  is an acclaimed journalist and op-ed columnist for the New York Times who appears frequently on CNN. He is the author of the New York Times bestselling memoir Fire Shut Up in My Bones, which has been adapted into an opera by Terence Blanchard that will open the 2021–22 season of the Metropolitan Opera. This will be a historic occasion—the first time an opera by a Black composer appears on the Met stage. He graduated magna cum laude from Grambling State University in Louisiana, where he received a B.A. in mass communications. He lives in Atlanta and has three children. Bakari Sellers made history in 2006 when, at just twenty-two years old, he defeated a twenty-six-year incumbent State Representative to become the youngest member of the South Carolina state legislature and the youngest African American elected official in the nation. In 2014 he was the Democratic Nominee for Lieutenant Governor in the state of South Carolina. Sellers is a CNN political analyst and served in the South Carolina state legislature. Recently named to Time's "40 Under 40" list, he is also a practicing attorney who fights to give a voice to the voiceless.   This event will be hosted by his publisher, HarperCollins, on Crowdcast and we will send you a link on February 3rd (in the a.m.) Tickets are $5 (event only) OR $30 (event plus a copy of The Devil You Know, mailed to your address via USPS media mail to addresses in the Continental U.S. ONLY).   Event Registration  
 

02/03/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually hosted by Town Hall Seattle
Sarah Jaffe with Kathi Weeks
Virtually hosted by Town Hall Seattle
Sarah Jaffe, a preeminent voice on labor, inequality, and social movements and author of Work Won’t Love You Back: How Devotion to Our Jobs Keeps Us Exploited, Exhausted, and Alone (Bold Type Books), appears in conversation with Kathi Weeks, Associate Professor of Women’s Studies at Duke University. In a deeply-reported examination of this culture, told through the lives and experiences of workers in various industries, Sarah Jaffe reveals her belief that we have all been tricked into buying into a new tyranny of work. From the unpaid intern, to the overworked teacher, to the nonprofit worker, and even the professional athlete, she makes the case that the labor of love myth is a recipe for exploitation. In a conversation that is more imperative than ever as the lines between home and work blur to an indistinguishable degree, she asserts that understanding this dynamic will empower us to work less and to demand what our work is worth. And once freed from those binds, we can find out what actually gives us joy, pleasure, and satisfaction. Sarah Jaffe is a Type Media Center fellow and an independent journalist covering labor, economic justice, social movements, politics, gender, and pop culture. She is the author of Necessary Trouble: Americans in Revolt. Her work has appeared in the New York Times, the Nation, the Guardian, the Washington Post, the Atlantic, and many others. She is the co-host, with Michelle Chen, of Dissent magazine’s Belabored podcast, as well as a columnist at the New Republic and New Labor Forum. Kathi Weeks is the author of The Problem with Work: Feminism, Marxism, Antiwork Politics, and Postwork Imaginaries and Constituting Feminist Subjects, and a co-editor of The Jameson Reader.   Event Registration  
 

02/04/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Jennifer Berney with Anne de Marcken
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Jenn Berney was one of those people who knew she was destined for motherhood--it wasn't a question of if, but when. So when she and her wife Kelly decided to start building their family, they took the next logical step: they went to a fertility clinic. But they soon found themselves entrenched in a medical establishment that didn't know what to do with people like them. With no man factoring into their relationship, doctors were at best embarrassed and at worst disparaging of the couple. Through the ups-and-downs of her own journey, Jenn reflects on a turbulent past that has led her to this point and a bright future worth fighting for. With clarity, determination, and hope, her book, The Other Mothers: Two Women’s Journey to Find the Family That Was Always Theirs (Sourcebooks) gives us a wonderful glimpse into the many ways we can become family. Jennifer Berney’s essays have appeared in Longreads, Tin House, The Offing, The New York Times, The Washington Post, and many other publications. She holds an MFA in Creative Writing from The University of Washington. She lives with her partner and two children in the Pacific Northwest. The Other Mothers is her first book. Anne de Marcken is a writer and interdisciplinary artist. Her credits include multimedia installations, short and feature-length films, and hybrid fictions and realities of various lengths. She is author of the lyric novella, The Accident: An Account (Spuyten Duyvil, 2020)   Event Registration  
 

02/04/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Town Hall Seattle
Thom Hartmann
Virtually Hosted by Town Hall Seattle
Thom Hartmann continues his vital series of ‘Hidden History’ books tonight with his newest, The Hidden History of American Oligarchy: Reclaiming Our Democracy from the Ruling Class (Berret-Koehler), this following those earlier: The Hidden History of Monopolies, The Hidden History of the War on Voting, The Hidden History of the Supreme Court and the Betrayal of America, and The Hidden History of Guns and the Second Amendment. There have been other vital books, as well. “With his awesome command of history and politics, Thom Hartmann presents a terrifying, captivating, and meticulously documented analysis of the treachery by which the ruthlessly deranged gained the loyalty of the desperate using money’s power to corrupt. An urgent and essential read for those who seek a world that works for all.” —David C. Korten. “Thom Hartmann’s must-read new book is equally frightening and inspiring. It offers both a dire warning about the threat posed to our nation by the growing power of oligarchs and a prescription on how to save our nation from it.” —Dean Obeidallah. Presented by Town Hall Civics in partnership with Elliott Bay Book Company. Event Registration  
 

02/05/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Presented by Hugo House
Lauren Groff with Maria Semple
Virtually Presented by Hugo House
Hugo House’s Word Works series on craft continues its virtual run with National Book Award finalist fiction writer Lauren Groff talks about structure in both novels and short stories. Her books include Fates and Furies, Florida, and Delicate Edible Birds. Making this an even more lively and engaging time will be Maria Semple, beloved Seattle author of Where’d You Bernadette and Today Will Be Different.   Event Registration  
 
 
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02/08/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Rebecca Walker and Lily Diamond, with LaTonya Yvette
Virtually hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
In this time of global reckoning, revolution, and reinvention,Rebecca Walker and Lily Diamond, the authors of What's Your Story?: A Journal for Everyday Evolution (Sounds True) invite you to excavate the narratives that have shaped your life and write a new, fulfilling story for the future. Please join us for this virtual program, which features both authors in conversation with LaTonya Yvette. Consisting of 150+ questions--designed to be answered in as little as five minutes or as long as a lifetime-- What's Your Story?: A Journal for Everyday Evolution is essential for anyone ready to begin living their most authentic, creative, and meaningful life. Now in book form, this method is based on the authors' work with workshop participants and digital subscribers around the world.  "This journal is beautiful. It will help you find your voice and, finally, hold it sacred." -- Cleo Wade. Rebecca Walker, the author of seven bestelling books,  has contributed to the global conversation about race, gender, power, and the evolution of the human family for three decades. Her books include Black White and Jewish, Black Cool and Ade. Lily Diamond is a writer and advocate harnessing the power of digital media to democratize wellness and empower women through storytelling, accessible practices for inner and outer nourishment, and revolutionary acts of self-care within our earth and human communities. She is the creator of internationally beloved blog Kale & Caramel and author of bestselling memoir-cookbook Kale & Caramel: Recipes for Body, Heart, and Table. If you registered for the January 6th event, there is no need to re-register. Check your email for your Zoom link. Event Registration  
 
 

02/10/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Seattle Public Library
Brandon Hobson with David Heska Wanbli Weiden
Virtually Hosted by Seattle Public Library
Two of the finest younger writers to come along in recent years, Brandon Hobson, to be joined in conversation by David Heska Wanbli Weiden, give readers this evening occasioned by publication of Brandon Hobson’s new novel, The Removed (Ecco). An enrolled citizen of the Cherokee Nation, Brandon Hobson has written several books, his most recent previous novel, Where the Dead Sit Talking, being a 2018 National Book Award finalist. “Brandon Hobson has given us a haunted work, full of voices old and new. It is about a family’s reckoning with loss and injustice, and it is about a people trying for the same. The journey of this family’s way home is full—in equal measure—of melancholy and love. The Removed is spirited, droll, and as quietly devastating as rain lifting from earth to sky.”—Tommy Orange. “Astonishing. This moving and affecting novel tells the story of a Native family in crisis, each person dealing with the aftereffects of grief and trauma following the murder of a beloved son. But this is a book of hope and healing, a remarkable tale of resilience in the face of unimaginable pain. Written with lyrical and evocative prose and a deep reverence for Cherokee culture and tradition, The Removed is an important contribution to indigenous fiction and American literature.” -David Heska Wanbli Weiden. Speaking of David Heska Wanbli Weiden, the Denver-based Sicangu Lakota Nation writer, lawyer, and professor is most recently the author of last summer’s well-received debut thriller, Winter Counts (Ecco). "Winter Counts is both a propulsive crime novel and a wonderfully informative book. David Heska Wanbli Weiden has written the first of what I hope is a series of books about life on Rosebud Reservation. Virgil Wounded Horse, his nephew Nathan, and Marie Short Bear are more than characters; they brim with intrigue and authentic life."  -Louise Erdrich. Again, Tommy Orange: “Winter Counts is a marvel. It’s a thriller with a beating heart and jagged teeth. This book is a brilliant meditation on power and violence, and a testament to just how much a crime novel can achieve. Weiden is a powerful new voice. I couldn’t put it down.”   Co-presented by The Seattle Public Library and Elliott Bay Book Company. Event registration  
 

02/10/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Town Hall Seattle
Catherine E. McKinley with Erika Massaquoi
Virtually Hosted by Town Hall Seattle
Curator, writer and designer Catherine E. McKinley appears in conversation with Erika Massaquoi via livestream to share photos and stories from her striking and subversive work The African Lookbook: A Visual History of 100 Years of African Women (Bloomsbury). "From young girls in Mali wearing ‘hot’ outfits beneath attire deemed respectable by Muslim culture to women defying Western Christianity by wearing traditional African attire to church, McKinley focuses on the ways in which fashion is a form of protest and resistance, preserving history in ‘more resilient and revealing’ ways than any other. The African Lookbook is an exquisite collection of African photographs and stories bearing witness to the power and grace of African women." - Booklist. Catherine E. McKinley is a curator and writer whose books include the critically acclaimed Indigo, a journey along the ancient indigo trade routes in West Africa, and The Book of Sarahs, a memoir about growing up Black and Jewish in the 1960s–80s. The McKinley Collection, featured here, is a personal archive representing African photographs from 1870 to the present. Erika Dalya Massaquoi is a designer and curator who has created exhibitions for the Seattle Art Museum, the Frye Museum of Art, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) List Visual Arts Center, and the Studio Museum in Harlem. Her publications include DISGUISE: Masks and Global African Art (Yale University Press).    Event registration    
 

02/11/2021 - 5:00pm

Hosted Virtually by Alan Gratz
Alan Gratz
Hosted Virtually by Alan Gratz
Please join us on Crowdcast tonight to hear children’s book author Alan Gratz much anticipated new novel Ground Zero (Scholastic). On September 11, 2001 Brandon, a nine-year-old boy, goes to work for the day with his dad… at the World Trade Center in New York City. When two planes hit the towers, Brandon and his father are trapped inside a fiery nightmare as terror and confusion whirl around them. Can they escape — and what will the world be like when they do? In present-day Afghanistan, Reshmina is an eleven-year-old girl who is used to growing up in the shadow of war, but she has dreams of peace and unity. When she ends up harboring a wounded young American soldier, she and her entire family are put in mortal danger. But Reshmina also learns something surprising about the roots of this endless war. With his trademark skill, Alan Gratz delivers an action-packed and insightful story of two kids whose lives connect in unexpected ways, and reminds us how the past and present are always more linked than we think. Alan Gratz’s books include Refugee. While this book is suitable for Grades 4-7, we think that older children and adults will also enjoy this event.   Event Registration  
 

02/11/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Peter Mendelsund
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
What can’t Peter Mendelsund do? Presently creative director for The Atlantic, his work was first visible to readers as the designer of many books beautifully put out into the world. Then he was the author of a number of books on design and the reading imagination, and now, novels. 2019’s excellent debut Same Same is now followed by The Delivery (Farrar, Straus & Giroux). This is the story of a young man - a young man who has come to a country and city as a refugee -  who delivers goods for a big company, doing what he can to make ends meet - and survive. “Peter Mendelsund’s The Delivery is not only truly original, and gorgeously written, it shines a light on a person, a population, generally invisible to all but themselves, which is among a novel’s more profound purposes. It’s a remarkable book.”—Michael Cunningham. “The infrastructure that delivers us anything we want, whenever we want it, is the work of millions of anonymous hands, millions of people—mostly unseen, mostly unthanked—who pop up and then disappear. In a quick, staccato style, Peter Mendelsund's haunting fable mirrors these movements, building and building to a startlingly full portrait a world that we too often let flash us by.”—Benjamin Moser. Event Registration  
 
 

02/13/2021 - 1:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Sonia Faleiro with Karan Mahajan
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
An award-winning writer who has called San Francisco, Mumbai and her present base of London as home, Sonia Faleiro is virtually here from over the ocean for her new non-fiction book, The Good Girls (Grove Press). As she did with her previous book, Beautiful Thing, albeit in a very different way, in The Good Girls, Sonia Faleiro looks at the lives of young women in India facing mortal peril. This story of two teenage girls who found dead near their village in Uttar Pradesh sparked a national uproar. Sonia Faleiro, whose work has been supported by the Pulitzer Center and the Investigative Center, dug beneath the sensationalism to give this powerful chronicle of violence and deaths that should never have had to be told.  “An extraordinary book studded with insights into media, justice, corruption, and the rules governing women’s lives. Padma and Lalli — harvesting mint, enchanted by a play, seeking freedom, wishing to be something — will stay powerfully with me.”—Megha Majumdar “Chilling and devastating, The Good Girls is narrative reportage at its very best.”—Fatima Bhutto. Joining Sonia Faleiro in conversation will be Karan Mahajan, who visited Seattle and Elliott Bay for his most recent novel, The Association of Small Bombs, which was a 2016 National Book Award finalist and one of The New York Times’ Ten Best Books of the Year. Co-presented with Tasveer. More about Tasveer here. Event Registration  
 

02/13/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Town Hall Seattle
Victor L. Wooten
Virtually Hosted by Town Hall Seattle
Whatever this evening will be in the virtual format it will be - surely great - but one can only imagine what a live and in-person occasion it would be to have five-time Grammy Award winner, bass player, composer, and producer Victor L. Wooten talk (and play?) in discussing his new book, The Music Lesson: A Spiritual Search for Growth Through Music (Penguin). “Victor Wooten has been doing things on the bass that nobody dreamed of, and we bass players can’t help but hunger for some insight into what inspires him and how he does it. Here, as in his music, he surprises us and gives us more depth than we expected, more of himself than many would dare. This is his journey, his mystical quest, not merely to play the bass but to fully encounter and understand Music itself.”—Tony Levin. Victor L. Wooten is also an original member of Béla Fleck and the Flecktones. Presented by Town Hall Arts & Culture in partnership with Elliott Bay Book Company.   Event Registration    
 
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02/16/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Leanne Betasamosake Simpson with Natalie Diaz
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
A Michi Saagiig Nishnaabeg  writer, scholar, teacher, and multi-faceted artist who has been writing books of intellectual scholarship and books of stories that at once break new ground and draw on particular Indigenous practices, Leanne Betasamosake Simpson makes this virtual reading appearance on the occasion of her stunning first novel, Noopiming: The Cure for White Ladies (University of Minnesota Press). She will be joined in conversation by award-winning poet Natalie Diaz. A narrator who lies embedded in the ice of a northern lake tells this story featuring an old woman, an old man, a giant, a caribou, a maple tree, and two younger humans - all rendered in ungendered pronouns - all to profound effect. “Noopiming is a novel that is as philosophically generative as it is stylistically original ... Leanne Betasamosake Simpson’s expansive work explores the indivisibility of beings — old woman, old man, tree, caribou, stone, ice, spirit, geese, the brain and more, all watching, grieving, thinking, acting, and listening amidst the ongoing and quotidian urgencies of capital. They are sleepless, ceaseless, trying to alter and to recode the world of consumerism, and their survival means that they must daily and collectively reconstruct existence in the city and its coterminous forests. Noopiming is far ahead of us in so many registers of story, language, and worldview; its cumulative effect is a new cosmography.”— Dionne Brand. “Noopiming is a rare parcel of beauty and power, at once a creator and destroyer of forms. All of Leanne Betasamosake Simpson’s myriad literary gifts shine here – her scalpel-sharp humor, her eye for the smallest human details, the prodigious scope of her imaginative and poetic generosity. The result is a book at once fierce, uproarious, heartbreaking, and, throughout and above all else, rooted in love.”— Omar El Akkad. “Leanne Betasamosake Simpson’s Noopiming once again confirms her position as a brilliant, daring experimentalist and a beautiful, radical portraitist of contemporary NDN life. The prose hums with a lovingness that moved me to tears, and with a humour that felt plucked right out of my rez adolescence. The chorus of thinkers, dreamers, revolutionaries, poets, and misfits that Simpson conjures here feels like a miracle. My heart ached and swelled for all of them. What I adored most about this book is that it has so little to do with the white gaze. Simpson writes for us, for NDNs, those made to make other kinds of beauty, to build other kinds of beautiful lives, where no one is looking. Noopiming is a book from the future! Simpson is our much-needed historian of the future!”— Billy-Ray Belcourt. There is much more to be said of Leanne Betasamosake Simpson and her work, which not only includes such books as As We Have Always Done: Indigenous through Radical Resistance, Islands of Decolonial Love, This Accident of Being Lost, the also-new A Short History of the Blockade, but a number of other books where she has helped edit, present, and support the work and knowledge of others. Natalie Diaz is a  Gila River Mojave poet and teacher, the author of the poetry collections My Brother Was an Aztec and 2020’s Postcolonial Love Poem, which was a National Book Award finalist. An opportunity to see her with her own work in full will be with Seattle Arts & Lectures on April 30. Event Registration  
 

02/17/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Betto Arcos with Mayumi Tsutakawa
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
A book literally asking to be read aloud, as its contents have largely been spoken or played aloud is Los Angeles-based, Veracruz-born radio journalist and music curator Betto Arcos’ Music Stories from the Cosmic Barrio. Published out of Mexico City by Fogra Editorial, the engaging, informative pieces on various aspects of Latin American music that comprise this book were written for aural presentation - on NPR, PRI’s ‘The World,’ the BBC, and KPCC. Music from all over Latin America is explored - with focus not only on the music, but on cultural and political contexts that music comes from. In addition to his ongoing writing on music, Betto Arcos is a founding member of Red de Periodistas Musicales de Iberoamérica or REDPEM. With him in conversation this evening will be esteemed Seattle cultural/arts writer, arts administrator Mayumi Tsutakawa.   Event registration  
 

02/18/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Red May
Red May presents: Jason Smith
Virtually Hosted by Red May
Innovation. Smart devices. Dazzling stock prices for tech companies. The promise of a new machine age sparking worries about accelerated joblessness thanks to next wave forms of automation. In Smart Machines and Service Work: Automation in an Age of Stagnation (Field Notes), Jason E. Smith looks behind the techno-hype to lay out a different story: the realities of a period of economic slowdown and expanding debt, with low growth rates and an increase of labor-intensive jobs at the bottom of the service sector. He shows how increasing inequality and poor working conditions have led to new forms of workers’ struggles. Ours is less an age of automation, Smith contends, than one in which stagnation is intertwined with class conflict.  Jason E. Smith is currently Chair of the Graduate Art MFA program at Art Center College of Design in Los Angeles. His writing and research are largely concerned with contemporary art and aesthetics, modern continental philosophy (Spinoza, Hegel, 20th century), and post-1968 political thought (primarily French and Italian). Presented by Red May.   Event registration   Watch on YouTube  
 

02/18/2021 - 7:30pm

Virtually Presented by Seattle Arts & Lectures
SAL presents Bill Gates with Anderson Cooper
Virtually Presented by Seattle Arts & Lectures
As much as he and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation have been involved with helping respond to the global crisis with COVID-19, Bill Gates has also, along the way been working on what has become a more enduring, encompassing crisis - the state of the planet we inhabit. He makes this special Seattle Arts & Lectures virtual appearance to discuss what he is seeing in his new book, How to Avoid a Climate Disaster: The Solutions We Have and the Breakthroughs We Need (Knopf). Mr. Gates will be in conversation with Anderson Cooper. Tickets include a copy of the book, which will be mailed out to ticket-holders per Seattle Arts & Lectures’ protocols. Event Registration  
 
 

02/20/2021 - 7:30pm

Virtually Hosted by Town Hall Seattle
Ronald A. Crutcher
Virtually Hosted by Town Hall Seattle
Born to two parents who never graduated high school, Dr. Ronald A. Crutcher grew up to become a leader at the highest levels of academia and the arts. As a child musician, he met with Coretta Scott King. As an adult educator, he sat at Maya Angelou’s holiday table. But it is Dr. Crutcher’s success as a Black intellectual steering through highly charged social issues that makes his story both unforgettable and urgently important, and he joins us to share some lessons as captured in his memoir I Had No Idea You Were Black: Navigating Race on the Road to Leadership. He relates how he navigated “cancel culture” at the University of Richmond, where he serves as President in the heart of the former Confederacy, and how he taught Northeast liberals the true meaning of functional diversity during his time as President of Wheaton College in Massachusetts. Don’t miss this compelling presentation that offers lessons on life and leadership while bridging America’s cultural divides. Dr. Ronald A. Crutcher is a national leader in higher education and a distinguished classical musician and Professor of Music. He became President and Professor of Music at the University of Richmond in 2015. Previously, he served for ten years as President of Wheaton College in Massachusetts. He is a former member of the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra and sits on the board of the Richmond Symphony.   Event Registration  
 
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02/21/2021 - 2:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Town Hall Seattle
Noreena Hertz
Virtually Hosted by Town Hall Seattle
Even before a global pandemic introduced us to terms like “social distancing,” loneliness was a defining condition of the twenty-first century, academic Noreena Hertz posits. She argues that the fabric of community was unraveling, and our personal relationships were under threat. Combining a decade of research with firsthand reporting, Hertz joins us to discuss her findings, collected in her book The Lonely Century: How to Restore Human Connection in a World that’s Pulling Apart. She shares how technology is not the sole culprit, but equally to blame are the dismantling of civic institutions, the reorganization of the workplace, the mass migration to cities, and decades of policies that have placed self-interest above the collective good. This loneliness is not merely a mental and physical health crisis, Hertz contends, but an economic and political one as well. But she believes it’s a crisis we have the power to solve, and she offers bold solutions for healing our fractured communities and restoring connection in our lives. Noreena Hertz is a renowned thought leader, academic, and broadcaster. She is the author of The Silent Takeover, The Debt Threat, and Eyes Wide Open. Her opinion pieces have appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, The Guardian, and Financial Times. She is currently based at University College London, where she holds an honorary professorship.   Event Registration  
 

02/21/2021 - 7:30pm

Virtually Presented by Seattle Arts & Lectures
SAL Literary Arts presents Bill Bryson
Virtually Presented by Seattle Arts & Lectures
Seattle Arts & Lectures’ 2020-21 Literary Arts Series - picture the evenings in Benaroya Hall if you are picturing such nights - continues in virtual form this evening with Bill Bryson, renowned author of numerous narrative excursions through aspects of life, being, and place, a Des Moines, Iowa-centric view of the world, he might say, that has insight, and not a little humor. The author of such books as A Walk in the Woods, The Life and Times of the Thunderbolt Kid, and A Short History of Nearly Everything, he is ‘here’ this evening with his newest, The Body: A Guide for Occupants (Anchor), newly released in paperback.   Event Registration  
 

02/22/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Valzhyna Mort with Ilya Kaminsky
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Published late in 2020 to universal high praise, Valzhyna Mort’s utterly powerful poetry collection, Music for the Dead and Resurrected (Farrar, Straus & Giroux), is steeped in a tradition of poetic witness for her native Belarus in this day and time. “Her memory is incurable, and her imagination is anguished, because the small country she comes from is beauty and sorrow. Boldly, Valzhyna Mort stands out in the Belarusian poetic tradition. Reading her work, one feels that she has come to us from the whole earth.” - Svetlana Alesievich. “At the core of Valzhyna Mort’s lyric fusion of personal and collective history is the uncontrolled nuclear chain reaction at Chernobyl, spreading the ‘radiation of the unknown tongue’ across her natal city of Minsk, Belarus … In the liminal space between language and silence, at dizzying imaginative speed, Mort transmutes her third language, English, into something resembling a fourth: the language of all that has been kept from consciousness concerning the past. Her lyric art in contemporary English is astonishing, and glimmering beneath it is something not often encountered: the sensibility of another world, arriving to inform our perilous present. Music for the Dead and Resurrected is fiercely original and a tour de force.” - Carolyn Forché. Valzhyna Mort’s previous collections, Factory of Tears and Collected Body come from Copper Canyon Press. Making this program even more special is that engaging in conversation with Valzhyna Mort will be award-winning poet Ilya Kaminsky, most recently author of the transcendent collection, Deaf Republic. Event Registration  
 

02/22/2021 - 7:30pm

Virtually Hosted by Town Hall Seattle
Anna North and Alexis Coe
Virtually Hosted by Town Hall Seattle
A young woman outlaw in 1894 and a new look at the life of George Washington: what could these two stories have in common? Perhaps more than you’d think. Both introduce a new look at an often romanticized area of American history, seen through a feminist lens. Authors Anna North and Alexis Coe join us via livestream in conversation about rewriting history in genres that are often dominated by men. With North’s novel Outlawed and Coe’s nonfiction You Never Forget Your First: A Biography of George Washington, they consider what their unique perspectives can bring to the analysis and storytelling of these recognizable tales. North discusses her intention to dust off the myth of the old West, and to reignite the glimmering promise of the frontier with an entirely new set of feminist stakes. Coe shares about her form-shattering and myth-crushing biography of America’s first president, including her issues with past male biographers. Join them for a look at subversion of the Western and biographical genres that asks: what other kinds of stories would be transformed by being told from a new point of view? Anna North is a graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and the author of two previous novels, America Pacifica and The Life and Death of Sophie Stark, which received a Lambda Literary Award in 2016. She has been a writer and editor at Jezebel, BuzzFeed, Salon, and the New York Times, and she is now a senior reporter at Vox. Alexis Coe is the award-winning author of Alice + Freda Forever: A Murder in Memphis (soon to be a major motion picture). Coe has frequently appeared on CNN and the History Channel, and has contributed to The New York Times, The New Yorker, and many other publications. She is a host of Audible’s Presidents Are People Too! and No Man’s Land.   Event Registration  
 

02/23/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Anakana Schofield with Michelle Dean
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Were there not COVID, and were the border between our neighbors to the north and we open, we likely would have been presenting this reading by award-winning Vancouver writer Anakana Schofield for her newly published novel, Bina: A Novel in Warnings (New York Review of Books). “Bina is a fiction of the rarest and darkest kind, a work whose pleasures must be taken measure for measure with its pains. Few writers operate the scales of justice with more precision ... The novel’s themes—male violence, the nature of moral courage, the contemporary problems of truth and individuality, the status of the female voice—could hardly be more timely or germane. Schofield’s sense of injustice is unblinking and without illusion, yet her writing is so vivacious, so full of interest and lust for life: she is the most compassionate of storytellers, wearing the guise of the blackest comedian.”—Rachel Cusk. “Intimate, disarming, and riotous, Bina is a searing exploration of one woman’s soul that unwinds like a reluctant confession. Whether Bina is rescuing a ne’er-do-well from a ditch, taking a hammer to a plane or considering the dark request of her best friend, Schofield has created a compelling, practical everywoman—a woman who has had enough and is ready to make a spectacle.”—Eden Robinson. Appearing in conversation with Anakana Schofield this evening is Los Angeles-based Canadian writer Michelle Dean, most recently author of Sharp: The Women Who Made an Art of Having an Opinion.   Event Registration  
 

02/24/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Ian Rosenberg with David M. Skover
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Media attorney Ian Rosenberg answers some key questions and cases having to do with speech in his engaging and accessible book, The Fight for Free Speech: Ten Cases That Define Our First Amendment Freedoms (New York University Press). He appears tonight in conversation with Seattle University Professor, David M. Skover. About The Fight for Free Speech: "A deep dive into 10 precedent-setting legal actions that helped define the scope--and limits--of the First Amendment...The toughest nut in the book is the dividing line between hate speech and free speech, a discussion that anyone in media and legal circles will want to study closely. Essential reading for journalists, political activists, and ordinary citizens alike."-Kirkus Reviews.  Ian Rosenberg is Assistant Chief Counsel at ABC, Inc., where he has provided pre-broadcast counsel for ABC News clients on libel, newsgathering, intellectual property, and FCC regulatory issues since 2003. Professor David M. Skover, the Fredric C. Tausend Professor of Law at Seattle University School of Law to co-host the talk. Professor Skover is the co-author of nine books, including most recently The People v. Ferlinghetti: The Fight to Publish Allen Ginsberg's "Howl" (Rowman & Littlefield) with Ronald Collins.   Event Registration  
 

02/25/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Town Hall Seattle
Jack Schneider and Jennifer Berkshire with Diane Ravitch
Virtually Hosted by Town Hall Seattle
Betsy DeVos may be the most prominent face of the seeming push to dismantle public education, but educational policy experts Jennifer Berkshire and Jack Schneider believe she’s part of a larger movement that’s been steadily gaining power for decades. While support for public education today is stronger than ever, Berkshire and Schneider argue, the movement to save our schools remains fragmented, variable, and voluntary while those who seem set on tearing down the public school system are unified, patient, and well-resourced. Tonight Jennifer Berkshire and Jack Schneider discuss A Wolf at the Schoolhouse Door: The Dismantling of Public Education and the Future of School (The New Press) with Diane Ravitch. Sounding an alarm, they present a call for public reckoning on behalf of the millions of families served by the American educational system—and many more who stand to suffer from its unmaking. Jennifer Berkshire is a freelance journalist and a host of the education podcast “Have You Heard.” Her writing on the politics of education has appeared in the Nation, Salon, the Baffler, the Progressive, and the New Republic. Jack Schneider is also a host of the education podcast “Have You Heard” and an assistant professor at UMass Lowell. He co-founded the Massachusetts Consortium for Innovative Education Assessment, a partnership of eight MA public school districts and their local teacher unions. He is a regular contributor to the Atlantic and the Washington Post. Diane Ravitch is a Research Professor of Education at New York University and a historian of education. She served as the Assistant Secretary of Education during the Bush I administration.    Event Registration  
 

02/26/2021 - 5:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Conjunctions 75: Dispatches from Solitude group reading
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Bradford Morrow, editor of Conjunctions, a literary journal published by Bard College since 1981, hosts an evening with some of the contributors to Conjunctions:75, Dispatches from Solitude. This issue gathers fiction, poetry, essays, and genre-bending work from writers far and wide who respond to the deficits of quarantine, self-isolation, and distancing. Edited by novelist and Bard College literature professor Bradford Morrow, Dispatches from Solitude features two previously unpublished songs by Sandra Cisneros; recent fiction by the late H. G. Carrillo; and new writing by Forrest Gander, Helena María Viramontes, Bennett Sims, Colin Channer, Rikki Ducornet, Kyoko Mori, John Yau, Charles Bernstein, Marc Anthony Richardson, Brandon Hobson, Michael Ives, Nathaniel Mackey, Rick Moody, and many others. Contributors expected to join us tonight: Those expected to join us tonight: Bradford Morrow, Sandra Cisneros and Henry Cisneros, Brandon Hobson, Nathaniel Mackey, and Barbara Tran. More about Conjunctions here   Event Registration  
 

02/27/2021 - 7:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
African American Writers Alliance
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Between the time that is that of many years in passing and the particular way that time has been skewed this past year, we are thinking that for the thirtieth (!) time, Seattle’s African American Writers Alliance has given group readings at Elliott Bay - amongst the other places, now, that they have also been reading over the years. We are talking generations now. Whether this is the actual thirtieth time or not (we believe Randee Eddins is working on a history), it is most certainly the first time we’ve hosted this group of new, aspiring, and also established writers, of varying ages, genres, and experience by virtual means. This, again, should be something. Tonight's readers are: Margaret Barrie, Helen Collier, Minnie Collins, Noni Ervin, Monique Franklin, Gail Haynes, Nation Son Holmes, James D. Macon, Georgie S. McDade, Merri Ann Osborne, Gaylloyd Sissón, Santiago Vega, and Jacquline (Jaye) Ware. For more on the NW African American Writers Alliance, tonight’s reading, and other NWAAWA activities over the year, please contact Living Legend honoree Georgia McDade (206.722.0964) or click here. Event Registration  
 
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