March 2018

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03/01/2018 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Akwaeke Emezi
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
This month begins with one of the more audacious novels to come along in some time, never mind that it’s also a debut. An Igbo and Tamil writer raised in Nigeria, now living, working and based "in liminal spaces" in New York, Akwaeke Emezi is here tonight with Freshwater (Grove). “In her mind-blowing debut, Emezi weaves traditional Igbo myth that turns the well-worn narrative of mental illness on its head, and in doing so she has ensured a place on the literary-fiction landscape as a writer to watch . . . Emezi’s brilliance lies not just in her expert handling of the conflicting voices in Ada’s head but in delivering an entirely different perspective on just what it means to go slowly mad. Complex and dark, this novel will simultaneously challenge and reward lovers of literary fiction. A must-read.” —Booklist. “In Emezi’s remarkable debut novel, Freshwater, we enter the lives of our protagonist, starting in Nigeria and ending in the United States. Every page is imbued with radiant prose, and a chorus of poetic voices. With a plot as alive and urgent as it is relatable, Freshwater is also solidly its own, brims with its unique preoccupations. Never before have I read a novel like it—one that speaks to the unification and separation of bodies and souls, the powers or lack thereof of gods and humans, and the long and arduous journey to claiming our many selves, or to setting our many selves free.” —Chinelo Okparanta, joined by Taiye Salasi, NoViolet Bulawayo, Tananarive Due, Esmé Weijun Wang, Daniel José Older, and Binyavanga Wainaina in early praise.  
 

03/02/2018 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Paige Embry
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Paige Embry’s immersion into the lives of bees native to North America began in her garden, where she began to realize that native bees (not honey bees) pollinate tomatoes and many other plants that make up much of our food supply. Her book, Our Native Bees: North America’s Endangered Pollinators and the Fight to Save Them (Timber Press), links endangered bee health to human health and takes readers into the field with those studying and working to protect both.   "Designed to educate everyone from bee and honey enthusiasts to amateur gardeners and agricultural professionals, Embry's captivating profiles of just a few of the myriad native bee species and the dedicated individuals and institutions committed to their survival are as entertaining as they are enlightening." —Booklist.
 

03/03/2018 - 10:00am

Seattle University - Pigott Auditorium
Saturday University with Lucinda Ramberg
Seattle University - Pigott Auditorium
901 12th Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
“We Were Always Buddhist:" Caste Emancipation and Sexual Politics in South India In 1956 anti-caste activist Dr. B.R. Ambedkar called upon his followers to convert to Buddhism as the equalitarian religion of the original inhabitants of the subcontinent. Since then, conversion to Buddhism in India has been widely understood as a mode of political dissent, and a means of escape from the discrimination and stigma attached to “untouchability.” Drawing on ethnographic research, this talk considers the realization of this dream and its paradoxes. About the Presenter: Professor Lucinda Ramberg, Cornell University, is a medical and sociocultural anthropologist and interdisciplinary scholar. Her research projects in South India and the United States have roots in longstanding engagements with the politics of sexuality, gender, and religion. Her first book, Given to the Goddess: South Indian Devadasis and the Sexuality of Religion (Duke University Press, 2014), is an ethnography of a contemporary practice in which girls are married to a goddess. Saturday University is held in partnership with the University of Washington Jackson School of International Studies, Seattle University, and Elliott Bay Book Company.   get tickets  
 

03/03/2018 - 11:00am

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Children's Storytime - ages 2 and up
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Ave
Seattle, WA 98122
Our weekly Children’s Storytimes commence for March with this reading from picture and storybook favorites out of our children’s section. One of our Elliott Bay bookfolk will do the reading and telling honors. Go to the castle in the children’s section … and the stories begin! Please join us.  
 

03/03/2018 - 3:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Tahir Hamut with Darren Byler
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
As part of a Seattle visit initiated by the China Studies Program at the University of Washington, we are pleased to present here this bilingual reading program by visiting Uyghur Chinese poet, filmmaker, and literary critic Tahir Hamut. He will read poetry and discuss the fraught political situation in the Uyghur homeland of northwest China. The Distance and Other Poems is a recently published collection done in China (not currently available in the US). Tahir Hamut first began writing poetry in the late 1980s when he was in Beijing studying with the Chinese language "misty" poets. During that time he was one of the leaders of the Tiananmen Square protests and became an acquaintance of the late Liu Xiaobo. He spent a number of years in prison as a result of his political and cultural work. His writing has been published throughout China and in translation in a number of outstanding poetry journals in the US including Words Without Borders, Berkeley Poetry Review, Asymptote, Crazy Horse, Gulf Coast, and Banango Street among others. Darren Byler, who has been part of other programs by visiting Chinese writers, is a Ph.D. candidate in anthropology at the University of Washington.
 

03/03/2018 - 7:30pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Wordplay presented by Bushwick Book Club & Seattle7Writers
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Seattle’s Bushwick Book Club produces unique, one-of-a-kind, live musical literary events in order to increase awareness of literature and songwriting. Tonight’s annual collaboration with Seattle7Writers features original compositions inspired by books by three local writers: Love and Trouble by Claire Dederer (music by Del Rey, Leslie Braley, Julia Massey), Weed by David Schmader (music by Joy Mills, Vince Martinez, Lizzie Weber) and Welcome Thieves by Sean Beaudoin (music by Nick Droz, Wes Weddell, Chris Poage). Garth Stein serves as the evening’s M.C. Ticket proceeds benefit STYLE, Bushwick’s educational program, which provides in-school music and reading workshops for grades K-12. Tickets ($10 in advance and $15 at the door) and more information about Bushwick and about STYLE here.
 
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03/04/2018 - 3:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Virgil Fassio with Joel Connelly
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Stories of a life, and of a life lived in newspapers will be told today, for a book rife with them, as Virgil Fassio, from 1978 to 1993 the publisher of the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, is here for the release of his memoir, Steel City to Emerald City: A Newspaperman's Life Journey (CreateSpace). He will be joined by venerable Seattle P-I journalist Joel Connelly in conversation. This is a story of newspapering from early on, how this work took Virgil Fassio around the world, and how a newspaper can be integral to the fabric of a community. “Virg Fassio is the real thing, an honest-to-God newspaperman who utilized skills honed in Pittsburgh, Wilmington, Detroit, and Chicago to make a major contribution in keeping Seattle a two-newspaper town long after most cities.” - Frank A. Bennack.
 

03/05/2018 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Natalie Singer with Sonora Jha
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Tonight Seattle writer Natalie Singer speaks about her memoir, California Calling: A Self-Interrogation (Hawthorne Books), which is an examination of the family and cultural myths that shape us. She draws from history, reportage, witness interrogation tactics, music and pop culture, and the iconography of the West to explore whether we can cure loneliness through landscape. Singer, who has served as writer-in-residence at Seattle’s On the Boards, appears in conversation with novelist Sonora Jha, who is also Associate Dean for the Academic Community at Seattle University. “If epic longing for an identity could be cured by entering a story, California Calling: A Self-Interrogation is the roadmap. Natalie Singer gives us the beating heart of an immigrant entering that mythic place we call the west. By and through the body of a girl becoming a woman we are reminded just how tricky forging a self is against the fractures and earthquakes and soul fires of life.”- Lidia Yuknavitch.  
 

03/05/2018 - 7:30pm

Seattle First Baptist Church
Robert B. Reich - SOLD OUT
Seattle First Baptist Church
1111 Harvard Avenue
Seattle, WA 98102
This event has sold out. There will be a standby line at the door. More info here. Up from Berkeley, where he is Chancellor’s Professor of Public Policy at the Richard and Rhoda Goldman School of Public Policy at the University of California, Berkeley, and a senior fellow at the Blum Center for Developing Economies, the author of fifteen books, including Saving Capitalism and The Work of Nations is Robert B. Reich. He has also served in three national administrations, and is here tonight with a manifesto-like new work, The Common Good (Knopf). Co-presented with TOWN HALL/INSIDE OUT CIVICS Series. $5 tickets are available at the door or in advance here. “Reich’s lucidly defining and empowering call for revitalized civic awareness—complete with an enticing list of recommended reading and discussion guide—is an ideal catalyst for book-group conversations.” —Booklist. “Brief but well-argued . . . a provocative essay.” —Kirkus Reviews.
 

03/06/2018 - 6:30pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Elliott Bay Book Group
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
All who wish to convene in this informally-set, ongoing reading group dedicated to both fiction and non-fiction are welcome to do so. This month’s selection is Jess Walter’s novel, Beautiful Ruins (Harper).   learn more
 

03/06/2018 - 7:00pm

Queer/Bar
Madame Nielsen
Queer/Bar
1518 11th Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
We are delighted, in addition to hosting Vegas Tenold at the bookstore this evening, to also be helping host at Queer Bar (one block east of Elliott Bay), the eminent "novelist, artist, performer, stage director and world history enactor, composer, chanteuse" that is the "multi-gendered" Madame Nielsen. She is here from Denmark for the U.S. publication of her novel, The Endless Summer (Open Letter, translated by Gaye Kynoch). This is a unique, engaging take on identity, love, coming of age, many layers and levels worked in in an assured narrative voice. Free admission. “At the same time romantic and grim, not just a novel about the heartbreaking illusions of youth, but also a self-consuming love affair with death.”—Carsten Jensen. “The Endless Summer by Madame Nielsen is my literary discovery of the year.” —Sjón.
 

03/06/2018 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Vegas Tenold
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
A journalist born and raised in Norway, schooled in the U.S., with writing in such publications as the New York Times, Rolling Stone, New Republic, and Al Jazeera America, Vegas Tenold has long been covering the most ideologically extreme of the white nationalist groups. His book, Everything You Love Will Burn: Inside the Rebirth of White Nationalism in America (Nation Books), is a sobering, open-eyed look at these groups’ existence, and their growing emergence. "Vegas Tenold has gone far beyond the comfort zone of most reporters to document the rise of America's radical right in the Trump era. His bone-chilling account of the white nationalist movement―based on extensive interviews with its leaders and chief ideologues―shows in painstaking detail how ideas that were once off limits have seeped into mainstream politics."―Sasha Polakow-Suransky. "A penetrating portrait of the men and women who are trying to instill fear and terror in our community. Vegas Tenold has done a great service by exposing their toxic ideologies in this must-read book."―Ibram X. Kendi.
 

03/07/2018 - 11:30am

The Elliott Bay Book Company
PJ Library Song & Storytime
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Our friends at PJ Library do these song & storytimes designed for tots, toddlers, and those looking after them at a few select bookstores in the area and visit as a regular feature of our Wednesday mornings. These are free and open to all and are usually thirty minutes of good fun, activity, and exploration of language, movement, and rhythm. Please join us in the Children’s Section by the castle!
 

03/07/2018 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Ijeoma Oluo
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
A Seattle-based writer who has been a significant part of numerous panels and forums, and whose writing has appeared in publications near and far—The Guardian, New York magazine, xoJane, and Jezebel, among them—Ijeoma Oluo is here this evening, as part of the launch of her nationally-significant first book, So You Want to Talk About Race (Seal Press). Ijeoma Oluo is also an editor-at-large with The Establishment. This, a night not to be missed. "So You Want to Talk About Race strikes the perfect balance of direct and brutally honest without being preachy or, worse, condescending. Regardless of your comfort level, educational background, or experience when it comes to talking about race, Ijeoma has created a wonderful tool to help broach these conversations and help us work toward a better world for people of color from all walks of life." —Franchesca Ramsey. "I don't think I've ever seen a writer have such an instant, visceral, electric impact on readers. Ijeoma Oluo's intellectual clarity and moral sure-footedness make her the kind of unstoppable force that obliterates the very concept of immovable objects." —Lindy West.
 

03/07/2018 - 7:00pm

Broadway Performance Hall
Patton Oswalt
Broadway Performance Hall
1625 Broadway Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Stand-up comedian, writer, and actor Patton Oswalt appears tonight to discuss his late wife Michelle McNamara’s book, I'll Be Gone in the Dark: One Woman's Obsessive Search for the Golden State Killer (Harper). McNamara, the author of the website True Crime Diary and a consultant for Dateline NBC, was investigating the case of this violent and still unidentified psychopath, who committed multiple sexual assaults and murders in California between 1976 and 1986. Framed by an introduction by Gillian Flynn and an afterword by her husband, Patton Oswalt, the book was completed by Michelle's lead researcher and a close colleague. “What readers need to know—what makes this book so special—is that it deals with two obsessions, one light and one dark. The Golden State Killer is the dark half; Michelle McNamara's is the light half. It's a journey into two minds, one sick and disordered, the other intelligent and determined. I loved this book." —Stephen King Tickets are $35 and include one copy of I’ll Be Gone in the Dark and admit one person to the presentation, which includes an audience Q&A. Tonight’s program does not include a public signing. Get Tickets
 

03/08/2018 - 6:30pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Underground YA Book Group grades 6 – 12
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Please join us for an ongoing discussion series with no assigned books, moderated by the (teen) readers themselves, with Elliott Bay booksellers on hand to assist, and provide fun things like exclusive access to early copies of forthcoming titles. The plan is to meet the second Thursday of each month. learn more
 

03/08/2018 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Amber Cantorna
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Amber Cantorna, daughter of an executive with conservative Christian ministry Focus on the Family, was homeschooled in a family in which perfectionism, reputation and appearances meant everything and being honest about being gay meant that her community would shun her. She tells this story (and that of finding love and of founding Beyond, a nonprofit that helps LGBTQ people navigate coming out) in her book, Refocusing My Family: Coming Out, Being Cast Out, and Discovering the True Love of God (Fortress Press).  “Amber Cantorna pulls back the curtain and reveals the real-life realities behind Focus's books, purity rings and radio shows. I hope that today’s young parents who are part of the evangelical community will allow her story to guide them to a better way of parenting, so they can discover a more authentic way of being Christians—and human beings, too.” —Brian D. McLaren.
 

03/09/2018 - 5:30pm

Pigott Auditorium
Ibram X. Kendi
Pigott Auditorium
901 12th Avnue
Seattle, WA 98122
This specially-presented lecture brings 2016 National Book Award-winning historian Dr. Ibram X. Kendi to Seattle University for this dedicated lecture, “How to Be Anti-Racist and Why It Matters.” His book, Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America (Nation Books), has established itself as a vital, essential study of this country’s most rooted notions. Dr. Kendi is presently Professor of History and International Relations and the Founding Director of the Antiracist Research and Policy Center at American University, and also the author of The Black Campus Movement. "An altogether remarkable thesis on history, but, in ways that are both moving and immediately painful, it also reverberates with the post-election autopsy we're all conducting right now... Stamped from the Beginning is a riveting (and often rivetingly written) work, well deserving of the National Book Award."―The Stranger. Co-presented by Philanthropy Northwest, Raikes Foundation, Casey Family Programs, and the Elliott Bay Book Company.   Get Tickets  
 

03/09/2018 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Shobha Rao with Laurie Frankel
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
A night we are particularly excited about is Shobha Rao’s return to Elliott Bay to read from her brilliant, beautiful, intense debut novel, Girls Burn Brighter (Flatiron). Here two years ago for her similarly bracing book of stories, An Unrestored Woman, Shobha Rao looks at the lives of young girls coming of age in a time when lives and fates can span from village India to apartment complexes in Seattle - as indeed Girls Burn Brighter does. The way for the young women at the heart of this book is not an easy one, but there is an indomitable spirit at work, in them, and in the fierce writing that is this book. “Girls Burn Brighter by Shobha Rao blew my heart up. Heart-shards everywhere. I am in awe of the warmth and humanity in this book, even as it explores some incredibly dark places. I’m going to be thinking about Girls Burn Brighter for a while, and you’re going to be hearing a lot about it.” —Charlie Jane Anders. “A confident debut novel set in India and America about the unbreakable bond between two girls. From the menacing nooks of India's underworld to the streets of Seattle, this searing novel traces the nuances of adulthood and the enduring power of childhood bonds.” —The Chicago Review of Books. Shobha Rao will be appearing in conversation with Seattle writer Laurie Frankel, whose books include This Is How It Always Is. Co-presented with HEDGEBROOK.
 

03/10/2018 - 11:00am

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Children's Storytime - ages 2 and up
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Join us for this fun hour of readings from picture and storybooks...Go to the castle in the children’s section...and the stories begin!
 

03/10/2018 - 3:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Minal Hajratwala
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
A writer and editor whose work and life embrace both this part of the world and over the seas in South Asia, Minal Hajratwala makes this welcome Elliott Bay return today, her long-awaited debut poetry collection, Bountiful Instructions for Enlightenment (The (Great) Indian Poetry Collective), in hand. Written over a span of two decades, these poems and performance texts comprise "a stunning collection that modulates between steady narratives full of anchored images and storytelling, and playful voices occurring out of lyric utterance."—Prageeta Sharma. Minal Hajratwala is also author of the 2009 family memoir, Leaving India: My Family’s Journey from Five Villages to Five Continents and editor of Out! Stories from the New Queer India. "She charms, sears, shocks and delights us.” - Meena Alexander.
 

03/10/2018 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Scarlett Sabet
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
One of the emerged stars of the lively London performance poetry world, Scarlett Sabet, makes her debut Seattle visit here tonight. A regular performer at The Troubadour, on Brompton Road, and at The Poetry Society's Poetry Cafe in Covent Garden, in London, and elsewhere in the world, she is the author of poetry collections including Rocking Underground and The Lock and the Key. This should be quite an evening. "What strikes me about Scarlett's work it that it's very cutting edge and it's making poetry interesting again. I love both the intensity and the spiritual aspect she conveys." —Sir Van Morrison.
 
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03/11/2018 - 3:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Willy Vlautin
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
We’re glad to welcome Willy Vlautin, novelist and singer/songwriter of the Richmond Fontaine, back to Elliott Bay this afternoon to read from Don’t Skip Out on Me (Harper Perennial), in which Horace, a Paiute and Irish ranch hand, decides to become a boxer. “Add Horace to the long list of those who have gone wrong by reading the wrong books, but like Emma Bovary, who developed delusions of grandeur by reading romance novels, Horace brings such heartbreaking passion to his misbegotten quest that we respond like crazed fans at ringside, though we aren't rooting as much for Horace to become a boxing champion as we are for him to somehow find the authentic self he seeks. That's what Vlautin does to us; he strips away our defenses with close-to-the bone prose that leaves us utterly exposed to the tragedy of being alive and every bit as thankful for those moments of aching humanity before the curtain falls.” —Booklist.
 

03/12/2018 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Lars Kepler
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
A novel which re-introduces to readers here one of the most popular thriller writers out of Scandinavia today brings Lars Kepler (the wife-husband duo of Alexandra Coelho Ahndoril and Alexander Ahndoril) to Seattle for the U.S. publication of The Sandman (Knopf, translated by Neil Smith). Actually the fourth book in a series featuring detective Joona Linna, readers will soon be able to read back, with new translations of those books forthcoming, as well as to await what will come next. What comes now is quite riveting. “Jurek Walter has been confined to an ultrasecure psychiatric ward near Stockholm for 13 years after being convicted of just two of the more than 20 murders he is suspected of having committed. Joona, who has always believed that Jurek had an accomplice, is vindicated when Mikael Kobler-Frost, a crime writer’s son who was thought to have been killed by Jurek, manages to escape captivity and provides some information about his captor, whom he calls the Sandman. Mikael’s revelation that his sister, who disappeared with him, is also still alive prompts the police to attempt a dangerous gambit: sending Insp. Saga Bauer into Jurek’s ward posing as a patient to try to get him to reveal enough information to rescue Felicia. Kepler doesn’t pull any punches, and his care in creating characters will make readers deeply invested in their fates.” —Publishers Weekly.  
 

03/13/2018 - 6:30pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Global Issues Book Group
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
This month’s selection is Henry Giroux's The Violence of Organized Forgetting (City Lights). learn more
 

03/13/2018 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Karen Karbo with Jennie Shortridge
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Hard to believe in 2018 that many women still have to choose between being true to themselves or being accepted and loved. Karen Karbo’s In Praise of Difficult Women: Life Lessons from 29 Heroines Who Dared to Break the Rules (National Geographic) celebrates the lives of 29 “difficult” women (including Carrie Fisher, Laverne Cox, Elizabeth Warren, Edie Sedgwick and J.K. Rowling)... who refused to choose. Tonight Seattle writer Jennie Shortridge interviews Karen Karbo about these inspirational women and what they have to teach us about how to live with courage and style. Karen Karbo’s books include The Stuff of Life and The Gospel According to Coco Chanel. She’s joined in conversation this evening with Seattle novelist Jennie Shortridge, most recently author of Love Water Memory.
 

03/14/2018 - 11:30am

The Elliott Bay Book Company
PJ Library Song & Storytime
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Our friends at PJ Library do these song & storytimes designed for tots, toddlers, and those looking after them at a few select bookstores in the area and visit as a regular feature of our Wednesday mornings. These are free and open to all and are usually thirty minutes of good fun, activity, and exploration of language, movement, and rhythm. Please join us in the Children’s Section by the castle!
 

03/14/2018 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Peter Carey with Pam McClusky
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
One of the most acclaimed writers in the world today, two-time Booker Prize-winning Australian fiction writer Peter Carey makes this most welcome Elliott Bay return. The author of thirteen previous novels, which have also received prestigious honors, the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize and the Miles Franklin Literary Award, among them, he manages to make each novel distinct and different from his others. There’s been no phoning it in. Case in point is the remarkable novel he is here for tonight, A Long Way from Home (Knopf), which uses a 1950s endurance car race around Australia to tell stories of that, but also to inquire into Aboriginal identity and the legacy of that identity’s theft.   “This picaresque comedy goes thematically deeper as it heads into the Outback. The antic tone of this 14th novel by Australian-born Carey belies its serious ambition. The comic spirit slyly suggests Shakespeare, an inquiry into identity and the farcical human existence. . . . Carey’s novel raises issues of culture and race that carry a thoroughly contemporary charge.” —Kirkus Reviews. “A moving meditation on multiple forms of paternal failure and the culture of racism that have shaped modern Australia. To give away more would risk spoiling the genuine pleasures.” —Patrick Flanery, The Spectator (UK). With Peter Carey for the conversation portion of the evening will be Pam McClusky, curator of African and Oceanic Art at the Seattle Art Museum, and author of several books. This should be a delight.
 

03/15/2018 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Geneen Roth
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
The author of such enduringly popular books as When Food Is Love, Lost and Found, and Women Food and God, as well as The Craggy Hole in My Heart and the Cat Who Fixed It, Geneen Roth is here this evening with her newest book, This Messy Magnificent Life: A Field Guide (Scribner). “Geneen Roth's secret sauce—the ingredients of which are warmth, wisdom, honesty and powerful self-scrutiny—are all blended to perfection in this lovely book, which will be a welcome companion to her legions of readers, and bring her many lucky new ones. There's a reason she's such a treasure.” – Dani Shapiro. “In This Messy Magnificent Life, we experience her signature divine wisdom and hilarious humanity—but Geneen also gives us something new and important. Here, Geneen shows us how our individual body and food obsessions are directly linked to our collective oppression as women—and how getting free from our personal prisons is crucial to seeking liberation at every level. This is a beautiful, funny, deeply relevant book—a vital work for this moment." —Glennon Doyle.
 

03/16/2018 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Apricot Irving
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Apricot Irving grew up as a missionary’s daughter in Haiti, where she and her mother and sisters lived in a secluded compound while her father traveled to preach and plant trees in the largely deforested countryside. In her memoir, The Gospel of Trees (Simon and Schuster), she examines the effects of her father’s idealism on his family and on the people he was trying to help and she revisits her life in Haiti when she is sent by This American Life to cover the aftermath of the 2010 earthquake. “With insight and admirable even-handedness, Irving shows the complex forces at play in both the story of Haiti's cycle of poverty and the more personal dynamics at play in her family as they struggle mightily to do God's work.” —Booklist.  Apricot Irving, now living in Portland, is a recipient of a Rona Jaffe Foundation Writers’ Award.
 

03/17/2018 - 11:00am

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Children's Storytime - ages 2 and up
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Join us for this fun hour of readings from picture and storybooks … Go to the castle in the children’s section … and the stories begin!    
 

03/17/2018 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Matthew Dickman and Emily Strelow
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
This joint reading brings two writers rooted in Portland, one the acclaimed poet Matthew Dickman, here with his third full-sized collection, and Emily Strelow, here with an historically-set debut novel. Matthew Dickman’s new Wonderland (W. W. Norton), preceded by All-American Poem and Mayakovsky’s Revolver, has been garnering raves at readings along the way to publication. Now, the book at last. “There is an unabashed rapture to these poems about ordinary American life in the analog age. How astounding, and how perfectly troubling, to be led through this fearsome, familiar realm of choked silences and violent collisions by an intelligence as deft and buoyant as Matthew Dickman’s.” —Tracy K. Smith. “With Wonderland, Matthew Dickman captures the vicissitudes of childhood: the mess and wildness of it all, how we are both held and discarded, the way darkness subsumes the glow and vice versa. Dickman’s poems are deft and sparkling and never cease to tear into you with their profound rawness and beauty.” —Carrie Brownstein. Emily Strelow’s The Wild Birds (Rare Bird Books, A Barnacle Book) ranges from 1870s San Francisco up to Oregon decades later, and then on to the present-day. A silver box of eggshells, a one-time gift from mother to daughter, plays a talismanic-like role in the narrative of lives lived in vividly rendered landscapes. “A lovesong to the living world, this shimmering, intricate web of a book is going to capture hearts.” —Karen Russell.
 

03/17/2018 - 7:30pm

Washington Hall
Lamont ‘U-God’ Hawkins with Dr. Daudi Abe
Washington Hall
153 14th Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Many music fans consider the Wu-Tang Clan to be hip-hop royalty. But remarkably, none of the founding members have told their story. Town Hall is excited to partner with 206 Zulu to present Raw: My Journey into the Wu-Tang (Picador), a history of this seminal hip-hop group by Lamont “U-God” Hawkins, one of the group’s founding members. U-God charts the group’s origins—how, brought up by the streets and bonding over their love of hip-hop, they sought to pursue the impossible: music as their ticket out of the ghetto. U-God is joined onstage by Dr. Daudi Abe, Seattle-based professor and historian who has written about race, culture, and hip-hop for over 20 years. Dr. Abe interviews U-God as he recounts stories of how he met and befriended those who would eventually form the Clan’s core: RZA, GZA, Method Man, Raekwon, Ol’ Dirty Bastard, Inspectah Deck, Ghostface Killah, and Masta Killa. Join U-God and Dr. Abe for an evening of hip-hop revelations as U-God shares his journey from the streets of Brooklyn to some of the biggest stages around the world, and captures in vivid detail the making of one of the most influential music acts in American music history. Born Lamont Jody Hawkins, U-God is an American rapper and hip-hop artist and one of the founding members of the legendary Wu-Tang Clan. A native New Yorker, Raw is his first book. Dr. Daudi Abe is a Seattle-based professor, writer, and historian who has taught and written about culture, race, gender, education, communication, hip-hop, and sports for over 20 years. His work has been published in The Stranger, Crosscut, and The Seattle Times; and he has appeared on national media such as MSNBC and The Tavis Smiley Show. His forthcoming book is Emerald Street: A History of Hip-Hop in Seattle.  Presented by Town Hall Seattle and 206 Zulu as part of the Arts & Culture series. Event Format: 50 minute book talk, 20 minute Q&A, post-event book signing.   Get Tickets  
 
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03/18/2018 - 11:00am to 1:00pm

Herban Feast
Hedgebrook Equivox
Herban Feast
4136 1st Avenue S
Seattle, WA 98134
Hedgebrook’s annual fundraiser always features great conversation, and is a chance to meet and chat with a variety of types of writers (including screenwriters and songwriters) who have been supported by this writers’ retreat for women. This year’s speakers are playwright Sarah Ruhl and historian Annette Gordon-Reed (The Hemingses of Monticello), but every table includes writers who are also Hedgebrook alums. Elliott Bay will be on hand with books by many of the writers in attendance. A great morning, a great cause. Click below for tickets ($150, including brunch) and more information. Tickets
 
 

03/20/2018 - 6:30pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Speculations Sci-Fi & Fantasy Book Group
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
This monthl's selection is Blake Crouch’s, Dark Matter (Broadway), as the March selection.   Learn More
 

03/20/2018 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Mark Sarvas with Charles Johnson
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Novelist Mark Sarvas, appearing in conversation with Seattle writer and University of Washington Professor Emeritus Charles Johnson tonight, reads from his new book, Memento Park (Farrar, Straus & Giroux), in which a man’s discovery of a painting stolen from his family during World War II leads to revelations about his estranged father and his family. Mark Sarvas is the author of the novel Harry, Revised. He is a member of the National Book Critics Circle, PEN/America, and PEN Center USA, and teaches novel writing at the UCLA Extension Writers Program.  "What does the next generation carry forward, and why is it so compelling? In his powerful novel Memento Park, Mark Sarvas explores the essential questions of history, its burdens, and legacies. The gifted novelist Sarvas takes us by the hand and tells us a story that demands to be heard." —Min Jin Lee. Charles Johnson, novelist and one of America’s preeminent scholars on literature and race, is the author of The Way of the Writer: Reflections on the Art and Craft of Storytelling, Middle Passage, The Dreamer and other books. A new book of stories, Night Hawks, is due out later this spring. Charles Johnson first appeared at Elliott Bay in 1984.
 

03/20/2018 - 7:00pm

Fireside Room, Hotel Sorrento
Honor Moore
Fireside Room, Hotel Sorrento
900 Madison St
Seattle, WA 98104
Hugo House this evening presents esteemed poet, memoirist, and teacher (The New School) Honor Moore. Her books include the memoir, The Bishop’s Daughter; a family biography, The White Blackbird; and the poetry collection, Red Shoes. She has received numerous honors and awards for her writing and also for her teaching, as she was three times the Distinguished Visiting Writer in Non-fiction at the University of Iowa’s creative writing program. Presented by HUGO HOUSE. Free admission.
 

03/20/2018 - 7:30pm

University Lutheran Church
Leonard Mlodinow
University Lutheran Church
1604 NE 50th St
Seattle, WA 98105
Leonard Mlodinow, the author of Subliminal and The Drunkard’s Walk, makes this welcome Seattle return for his newest book, Elastic: Flexible Thinking in a Time of Change (Pantheon). “It’s easy to describe the dizzying changes in our midst—from the gushers of information that wash over us to a world grown ever more interconnected. Far harder is to offer guidance on how we should respond. In this wise and persuasive book, Leonard Mlodinow calls for a change in the very way we think. Using a deft mix of science and storytelling, he shows the limits of linear thinking and the promise of ‘bottom up’ thinking that embraces ambiguity, asks the shrewd questions, and pursues novel answers to complex problems. Elastic is a book that will help you survive the whirlwind.” —Daniel H. Pink. “Timely and engrossing. Elastic is a fascinating exploration of one of the most important topics: how the human mind deals with change. If you liked Subliminal, you’ll love Elastic.” —Charles Duhigg. Co-presented with TOWN HALL/INSIDE OUT SCIENCE Series. Tickets ($5) and more information below.   Get Tickets
 

03/21/2018 - 11:30am

The Elliott Bay Book Company
PJ Library Song & Storytime
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Our friends at PJ Library do these song & storytimes designed for tots, toddlers, and those looking after them at a few select bookstores in the area and visit as a regular feature of our Wednesday mornings. These are free and open to all and are usually thirty minutes of good fun, activity, and exploration of language, movement, and rhythm. Please join us in the Children’s Section by the castle!
 

03/21/2018 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Niti Sampat Patel
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Niti Sampat Patel, a highly regarded scholar based in Mumbai, who teaches in India and the US, the author of Postcolonial Masquerades, is here tonight with her first novel, Moon Goddess (Loose Moose). This ambitious novel, tracing the lives of several generations of women in India, the US, and Lebanon, has its literary forebears in structure, and its own concerns in its stories. “A new and exciting novelist, Niti Sampat Patel offers a breathtaking tale of intrigue, mourning, and hope as her characters delve into the past to illuminate the present. This is an exhilarating and seductive book that carries the reader along on an unforgettable journey, making the exotic feel both familiar and surprising at every turn. Read it and be captivated as Moon Goddess weaves a careful yet complex tale in this rich, original, and compelling story. Niti Sampat Patel writes with energy and flair and is a welcome addition to the list of emerging literary talents this year.” —Cynthia Stamy.
 

03/21/2018 - 7:00pm

Microsoft Auditorium, Seattle Public Central Library
Aminatta Forna
Microsoft Auditorium, Seattle Public Central Library
1000 Fourth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98104
We are delighted to welcome back esteemed novelist Aminatta Forna, who is here with one of the finest works of this year, Happiness (Atlantic Monthly). The author of the novels Ancestor Stones, The Memory of Love, and The Hired Man, as well as the memoir The Devil That Danced on the Water, she tells a story set most largely in present-day London, the fateful meeting that eventually comes of a woman from the US there to study the ways of urban foxes, and a psychiatrist from Ghana. This is a beautiful book of chance, of how connections get made, the moments that make possible so much that is life. This is one not to be missed. “Aminatta Forna expertly weaves her characters’ stories, past and present, in and out of the larger story of London, which becomes as rich a character as the human beings and, indeed, the foxes; and she makes us care deeply about them all, the foxes, the people and the city. A terrific novel.”—Salman Rushdie. “The overarching message tucked into Scottish and Sierra Leonian writer Forna’s quietly resonant novel is this: Every living thing is the net sum of its history, and we carry the weight of our past on our shoulders.…Intricately woven…Forna’s novel is ultimately a mesmerizing tale studded with exquisite writing.” —Booklist. Co-presented with THE SEATTLE PUBLIC LIBRARY. Free admission.
 

03/22/2018 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Bruce Holbert with Richard Chiem
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
A resident of Nine Mile Falls—way over in the eastern part of Washington—and pretty much a lifelong resident of country dominated by the Columbia River’s course through the state, Bruce Holbert is one of the most acclaimed fiction writers to call the region home. He follows earlier books The Hour of Lead (winner of a Washington State Book Award) and Lonesome Animals, with his fierce new novel, Whiskey (MCD/Farrar, Straus & Giroux).   “[An] impressive novel . . . Like Cormac McCarthy, another bard of the modern West’s brutality, Holbert finds beauty and cruelty in the land, in the tease and punch of eloquently elliptical dialogue, and in the way humans struggle for love, self-knowledge, and a grip on life . . . He writes terse prose whittled to essentials and grained with vernacular . . . His characters may well brand a reader’s memory. A gut-punch of a bleak family saga that satisfies on many levels.” —Kirkus Reviews.   "Holbert returns with a violent, gruesome, and beautiful tale that . . . is perversely winning . . . The violence in this rangy, brilliant narrative is often grotesque, but this excess is tempered by dry humor, wonderful dialogue, and dark wisdom." —Publishers Weekly. With Bruce Holbert this evening, in conversation, will be Seattle fiction writer Richard Chiem, author of You Private Person.
 

03/23/2018 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Jennifer Natalya Fink with Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
What does it mean when corporations instead of states control not only the means to create environmental disasters, but also the tools to bury them? How does one revolt against these unelected entities? How do our most private desires get shaped by this stateless horror? In  Jennifer Natalya Fink’s novel, Bhopal Dance (F2c/University of Alabama Press), an owlish woman with a ménage of lovers leads a revolutionary Canadian political movement catalyzed by the Bhopal disaster, only to end up imprisoned. “Youth, bad romance, intellectual idealism, and the very big question of how to respond to the bigger nightmares we face on earth—Jennifer Natalya Fink gets deep into the muck of it, with sly humor and fierce intelligence, a conscience, a soul, and a gift for exploding what we think it is to tell a story.” —Michelle Tea. Jennifer Natalya Fink appears in conversation with Seattle’s Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore, author of The End of San Francisco, and of Sketchtasy, a novel forthcoming from Arsenal Pulp Press this fall.
 

03/23/2018 - 7:30pm

Fred Wildlife Refuge
Hugo Literary Series presents Joshua Ferris, Melissa Febos, E.J. Koh, Tomo Nakayama
Fred Wildlife Refuge
128 Belmont Ave East
Seattle, WA 98102
As return to Hugo House’s original location—in a brand-new building—draws ever-closer to reality, the prompt for this evening of the Hugo Literary Series is “real estate.” Here to engage are novelist Joshua Ferris (Then We Came to the End), non-fiction prose writer Melissa Febos (Abandon Me), poet E.J. Koh (A Lesser Love), and singer/songwriter Tomo Nakayama. Fred Wildlife Refuge is 21+. Tickets ($25 general/$20 Hugo House member/$12 Student with ID) and more information below.   Get Tickets
 

03/24/2018 - 11:00am

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Children's Storytime - ages 2 and up
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Join us for this fun hour of readings from picture and storybooks … Go to the castle in the children’s section…and let the stories begin!
 
 

03/24/2018 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Michael David Lukas
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Novelist Michael David Lukas, here a few years ago for his prize-winning debut novel, The Oracle of Stamboul, makes this welcome return from his Bay Area home to read from his newly published second work, The Last Watchman of Old Cairo (Spiegel & Grau). “Michael David Lukas has given us an elegiac novel of Cairo—Old Cairo and modern Cairo—with a bit of Berkeley thrown in. His prose is deeply evocative, and a sense of mystery and profound tristesse pervade this unusual narrative, which tells the story of a young California man on a quest to understand a puzzling gift left for him by his late father, the descendant of generations of watchmen at the venerable Ben Ezra synagogue in the depths of Old Cairo. The novel is enhanced by Lukas’ impressive historical research on the Geniza and the colorful characters involved in rescuing its treasure trove of documents. But his greatest flair is in capturing the essence of that beautiful, haunted, shabby, beleaguered, yet still utterly sublime Middle Eastern city.” —Lucette Lagnado. “A beautiful, richly textured novel, ambitious and delicately crafted, The Last Watchman of Old Cairo is both a coming-of-age story and a family history, a wide-ranging book about fathers and sons, religion, magic, love, and the essence of storytelling. This book is a joy.” —Rabih Alameddine.
 
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03/26/2018 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Himanee Gupta-Carlson
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Journalist and scholar Himanee Gupta-Carlson asks an essential question: what do nonwhites, non-Christians, and/or non-natives mean when they call themselves American? A daughter in one of Muncie's first Indian American families, she merges personal experience, the life histories of others, and critical analysis to explore the answers in her new book, Muncie, India(na): Middletown and Asian America (University of Illinois Press). Her stories of members of Muncie's South Asian communities unearth the silences imposed by past studies while challenging the body of scholarship in fundamental ways. Tonight we warmly welcome Himanee Gupta-Carlson, formerly a staff writer for the Seattle Times and a contributor to Crosscut, back to Seattle. She is currently an associate professor at SUNY Empire State College. "Gupta-Carlson brings a much-needed perspective to Middletown studies. But she also addresses pressing questions about what it means to be an American today. Through careful reflection and analysis, she develops a compelling case for the importance of involved and sustained dialogues that bridge difference." —Luke Eric Lassiter, coauthor of The Other Side of Middletown. Co-presented with the Asian American Journalists Association of Seattle and the Tasveer and Pigott McCone Endowed Chair in the Humanities of Seattle University.
 
 

03/28/2018 - 11:30am

The Elliott Bay Book Company
PJ Library Song & Storytime
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Our friends at PJ Library do these song & storytimes designed for tots, toddlers, and those looking after them at a few select bookstores in the area and visit as a regular feature of our Wednesday mornings. These are free and open to all and are usually thirty minutes of good fun, activity, and exploration of language, movement, and rhythm. Please join us in the Children’s Section by the castle!
 

03/28/2018 - 7:00pm

Seattle Public Central Library
Luis Alberto Urrea
Seattle Public Central Library
1000 Fourth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98104
The House of Broken Angels (Little, Brown) is, as author Luis Alberto Urrea describes it, “the story of an American family—one that happens to speak Spanish and admire the Virgin of Guadalupe. Imperfect and glorious, messy and hilarious, sometimes heroic.” Inspired by the death of his brother, this novel mines his own family history to tell a once-in-a-lifetime tale, simultaneously intimate in its detail and grand in its scope. “In Urrea's exuberant new novel of Mexican-American life, 70-year-old patriarch Big Angel de la Cruz is dying, and he wants to have one last birthday blowout. Unfortunately, his 100-year-old mother, America, dies the week of his party, so funeral and birthday are celebrated one day apart...Taking place over the course of two days, with time out for an extended flashback to Big Angel's journey from La Paz to San Diego in the 1960s, the narrative follows Big Angel and his extended familia as they air old grievances, initiate new romances, and try to put their relationships in perspective. Urrea (The Hummingbird's Daughter) has written a vital, vibrant book about the immigrant experience that is a messy celebration of life's common joys and sorrows." —Publishers Weekly. Luis Alberto Urrea has written many books, including poetry collections (Vatos), memoirs (Nobody’s Son), works of nonfiction (Across the Wire; Devil’s Highway, winner of a Lanaan Literary Award and finalist for both the Pulitzer Prize and the Kiriyama Prize), short story collections (The Water Museum) and novels (The Hummingbird’s Daughter). Hailed by NPR as a “literary badass” and a “master storyteller with a rock and roll heart,” Luis Alberto Urrea is a prolific and acclaimed writer who uses his dual-culture life experiences to explore greater themes of love, loss and triumph. Co-presented with THE SEATTLE PUBLIC LIBRARY. Free/no tickets necessary. 
 

03/28/2018 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Curtis White and Cheston Knapp
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Essayist, critic and novelist Curtis White, author of We, Robots: Staying Human in the Age of Big Data, The Science Delusion, Memories of My Father Watching TV and other books and co-founder of Fiction Collective 2, reads from Lacking Character (Melville House), his first novel in many years. “Curtis White's miraculous return to fiction is fun in the extreme. When a masked man arrives in N—, Illinois bearing a letter and claiming its contents a matter of life or death, the small town—and the fabric of reality—will never be the same.” —Kirkus Reviews. “White is a postmodern master, and in this wild satire he transforms the banal into magic.” —Publishers Weekly. Appearing with Curtis White tonight is Cheston Knapp, managing editor of Tin House and author of Up Up, Down Down (Scribner), a new collection of linked essays tackling the Big Questions. "Few writerly consciousnesses are as fun to inhabit as the limber brain of Cheston Knapp. With an ordnance of wit, acuity, and casual erudition, these essays explode the local and everyday into huge and moving human reaches. This is the sort of book you look up from to find the dull room around you newly charged with life's important particles." —Wells Tower.
 

03/29/2018 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Sebastian Abbot
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
An international affairs journalist who has covered the Middle East and parts of Asia, Sebastian Abbot also has some soccer credentials that he brings to his captivating first book, The Away Game: The Epic Search for Soccer’s Next Superstars (W. W. Norton), namely his having played at Princeton under coach Bob Bradley. The Away Game is about a program led by a Spanish scout who once had a hand in Lionel Messi’s development wherein young boys are scouted and selected from various parts of Africa, and then brought to an academy in Doha, Qatar, where they are taught to hone their skills. “Every fan of international soccer must read The Away Game. It shows how soccer stars are made, and it captures the desperation and the pain behind African footballers’ search for fame and money in the Middle East and Europe.” —Helon Habila. “What a fantastic story: a soccer-themed mix of Hoop Dreams and The Sports Gene, told with surpassing empathy for the boys of Senegal, Ghana, and other African countries involved. Sebastian Abbot knows his soccer, but The Away Game is a tale with universal appeal to anyone who cares about the human condition.” —Grant Wahl.
 

03/29/2018 - 7:00pm

The Frye Art Museum
Charles Johnson
The Frye Art Museum
704 Terry Avenue
Seattle, WA 98104
National Book Award winner, Professor Emeritus at University of Washington, and former MacArthur fellow, Charles Johnson is one of America’s preeminent scholars on literature and race. He will give a craft talk this evening as part of Hugo House’s Word Works series. Most recently the author of The Way of the Writer: Reflections on the Art and Craft of Storytelling (Scribner), he has a much-awaited new book of stories, Night Hawks, coming out later this spring. Presented by HUGO HOUSE. Tickets are $15 general admission, $12 for Hugo House members, and $6 for students with ID. Click below to purchase tickets and for more information.   Get Tickets
 

03/29/2018 - 7:00pm

Bellevue Arts Museum
Rosemary Crill
Bellevue Arts Museum
510 Bellevue Way NE
Bellevue, WA 98004
Rosemary Crill, recently retired Senior Curator for South Asia at the Victoria & Albert Museum, London, gives this Asia Talks lecture, “Kashmir Shawls and the West,” for the Gardner Center for Asian Art & Ideas, as part of a visit that also includes speaking at the Saturday University program on March 31. Her many books include Indian Embroidery, Marwar Painting, Indian Ikat Textiles, Chintz: Indian Textiles for the West and most recently The Fabric of India, which accompanied the major exhibition of the same name at the V&A in 2015-16. Co-presented with the GARDNER CENTER FOR ASIAN ART & IDEAS. Tickets are $15 general admission and $10 for Seattle Art Museum members. Click below to purchase tickets and for more information.   Get Tickets
 

03/30/2018 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Cindy Veach with Susan Rich
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Poet Cindy Veach reads today from Gloved Against Blood (CavanKerry Press/University Press of New England). Gloved Against Blood explores the relationships of four generations of women against a backdrop of the patriarchal textile mills of 19th century Lowell, Massachusetts. This collection speaks to family, lost love, infidelities, abandonment and the close work, women’s work of mending what is torn and making it like new despite the forces of inherited histories. Tonight she reads with Seattle poet Susan Rich, author of Cloud Pharmacy, The Alchemist’s Kitchen and other books.
 

03/30/2018 - 7:00pm

WithinSodo
Thi Bui
WithinSodo
2916 Utah Avenue South
Seattle, WA 98134
The Vietnamese Friendship Association’s Annual Gala has as its special guest this year the bestselling author, artist, former public school teacher Thi Bui. Her book, The Best We Could Do (Abrams), has won praise from near and far with its graphic narrative account of coming to the U.S. as a refugee from Vietnam and the war there. “This bold, brutal book is the new calligraphy—an exquisite marriage of alphabet and imagery. Each sentence, each scene, and each story breaks down a country, a family, and a father. Then, frame by frame, with artistic vigor and monastic devotion, Thi Bui rebuilds a world in which guilt conquers grief and gratitude becomes not only a guide, but our new Deity. The Best We Could Do teaches us how to say no to fear and yes to truth.” —Fae Myenne Ng. “Thi Bui’s stark, compelling memoir is about an ordinary family, but her story delivers the painful truth that most Vietnamese of the 20th century know in an utterly personal fashion—that history is found in the marrow of one’s bones, ready to be passed on through blood, through generations, through feelings. A book to break your heart and heal it.” —Viet Thanh Nguyen. Presented by the VIETNAMESE FRIENDSHIP ASSOCIATION, with support from RAISED DOUGHNUTS, YOUNG TEA, ABRAMS BOOKS, and ELLIOTT BAY BOOK COMPANY. Click below for tickets and more information.   Get Tickets
 

03/31/2018 - 10:00am

Plestcheeff Auditorium, Seattle Art Museum
Rosemary Crill
Plestcheeff Auditorium, Seattle Art Museum
1300 First Avenue
Seattle, WA 98101
This morning the Saturday University morning spring series on Asian Textiles commences with Rosemary Crill, recently retired Senior Curator, South Asia, at the Victoria & Albert Museum, London. (She is also giving a Gardner Center Asia Talks lecture Thursday, March 29 at the Bellevue Arts Museum - see that listing for more information). Rosemary Crill is the author of numerous works, most recently The Fabric of India. Her lecture subject this morning is “India’s Global Textile Trade.” Presented by the Gardner Center for Asian Art and Ideas, in partnership with the University of Washington Jackson School of International Studies, Seattle University and the Elliott Bay Book Company. Click below for tickets and more information.   Get Tickets
 

03/31/2018 - 11:00am

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Children's Storytime - ages 2 and up
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Join us for this fun hour of readings from picture and storybooks … Go to the castle in the children’s section … and the stories begin!  
 

03/31/2018 - 3:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Ali Cobby Eckermann
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
We are honored to be able to present, as part of a special U.S. visit, this appearance by acclaimed Yankunytjatjara, Australian Aboriginal poet Ali Cobby Eckermann. A recent recipient of the Windham-Campbell Prize, one of the most prestigious literary prizes in the world, she has, since her publication debut in 2009, had six volumes of poems and songs published, and the deeply moving memoir, Too Afraid to Cry (Liveright) published. Too Afraid to Cry tells, in taut, haunting, poetic language, of the Stolen Generations Aboriginal people have known. Ali Cobby Eckermann herself was taken from her birth family, and, in turn, had her own son taken from her. This book is one of naming, finding, reclaiming, remaking—utterly powerful, resonant and relevant within Australia, certainly, but here in North America, as well. “The memory blanket surrounding each of us is woven by the ancestors, begun before the child is a curled dream within the mother. When a baby is taken by force from its mother, the blanket is damaged. Pieces lost. The child will then be a wanderer until s/he finds the pieces and puts them back together. Ali Cobby Eckermann’s memoir is a memory blanket, put back together after many treacherous journeys. The weaving material is lyrical poetry, that deftly winds the story pieces together. This is an essential story, one everyone needs to hear.” —Joy Harjo.
 

03/31/2018 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Sorting Room Residency Group Reading with Matthew Bennett, Janet Buttenweiser, and Sierra Nelson
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Seattle7Writers’ Sorting Room Residency, so named for the work-storage space used to sort book donations for S7W’s Pocket Library* program, presents a reading by three writers in residence. Modest in its trappings, this space gives writers who need it a quiet place to do their work in exchange for help with the program.  Matthew Bennett, Janet Buttenwiser and Sierra Nelson will each read from work created while in residence.  S7W cofounder Jennie Shortridge emcees. S7W's Pocket Library program re-homes gently used books in shelters, food banks, correctional facilities, and other places with readers in need of books. To date, over 70,000 books have been donated. More about Seattle7Writers below.   More Info
 
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