February 2019

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
27
28
29
30
31
1
2
 
 
 
 
 

02/01/2019 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Pam Houston
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
An abiding favorite of readers here and elsewhere, book after book (she has been here for each), Pam Houston makes this welcome return to read from her newest, Deep Creek: Finding Hope in the High Country (W.W. Norton). From a 120-acre homestead up in the Colorado Rockies, vividly evoked here, Pam Houston also looks at a larger world she has been deeply immersed in.   “Deep Creek is a love letter to earth, animals, and the best of humanity. Pam Houston has taken our heartache and woven it back into hope. Her stories of love, loss, and a life lived in relationship to land give us good reasons not to give up on ourselves or each other. This is the book we need right now to remind us how to endure—passionately. An unstoppable heart song.” — Lidia Yuknavitch. “This book is endlessly wise, funny, and full of heart. To say that its clear-eyed, doom-laden—yet loving—message is important and timely would be an understatement. It is unapologetically sincere, utterly moving.” —Tommy Orange.
 

02/02/2019 - 10:00am

Seattle Art Museum
Saturday University with Nicholas Menzies
Seattle Art Museum
1300 First Avenue
Seattle, WA 98101
Saturday University ROOTS OF CULTURE: ESSENTIAL PLANTS OF ASIA Winter Lecture Series. This morning the Saturday University morning winter series on plants and culture in Asia continues with Nicholas Menzies, the Li Research Fellow in Chinese Botanical Science at the Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens. His lecture “The Story of the Camellia.” Presented by the GARDNER CENTER FOR ASIAN ART AND IDEAS, in partnership with the UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON JACKSON SCHOOL OF INTERNATIONAL STUDIES, SEATTLE UNIVERSITY and ELLIOTT BAY BOOK COMPANY.   information and tickets  
 

02/02/2019 - 10:30am

El Centro de la Raza
Civic Saturday with Eric Liu & Friends
El Centro de la Raza
2524 16th Avenue S
Seattle, WA 98144
Civic Saturday is a salve for the civic soul — a place to come together in civic community, be inspired and encouraged to reflect and connect, and create new civic traditions that are joyful and communal. What happens at Civic Saturday? This is a gathering of friends and strangers to hear readings, sing together, share thoughts and ideas, hear a "civic sermon" from Eric Liu and and new work from Civic Saturday Poet in Residence, Naa Akua and Musician in Residence, Michael Feldman.   We will be there with a pop up bookstore. Join us as we come together to continue nurturing a spirit of shared civic purpose. Doors open at 10:00AM. Program begins at 10:30AM. Free and open to all. Please email taneum@citizenuniversity.us if you would like to be an event volunteer or to request ASL interpretation services. Free admission. More information is at www.citizenuniversity.us.
 
3
4
5
6
7
8
9

02/03/2019 - 3:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Paul Nelson
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Paul Nelson, founder of SPLAB/Seattle Poetics LAB and Founding Director of the Cascadia Poetry Festival, joins us today with highlights from some of the interviews he has collected in his new book, American Prophets: Interviews with Thinkers, Activists, Poets & Visionaries (Seattle Poetics Lab). Included here are Paul Nelson’s interviews with luminaries such as Rupert Sheldrake, Jean Houston, Wanda Coleman, Allen Ginsberg and many others. Paul Nelson is also a poet and the author of Time Before Slaughter, co-editor of Make It True: Poetry from Cascadia and other books. He serves as literary executor for the late poet Sam Hamill.
 

02/03/2019 - 6:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Closing Early: 6pm
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
We're closing a little early this evening, at 6pm.  
 
 

02/05/2019 - 6:30pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Elliott Bay Book Group
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
All who wish to convene in this informally-set, ongoing reading group dedicated to both fiction and non-fiction are welcome to do so. This month’s selection is Edward Dolnick’s, The Forger's Spell: A True Story of Vermeer, Nazis, and the Greatest Art Hoax of the Twentieth Century (Harper Perennial).   learn more
 

02/05/2019 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Kirsten Sundberg Lunstrum and Sarah Cannon
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Award-winning Seattle short-fiction writer and high school English teacher Kirsten Sundberg Lunstrum and debut memoir author Sarah Cannon, also of Seattle, read together tonight from their new books. Kirsten Sundberg Lunstrum’s newest collection, What We Do With the Wreckage (University of Georgia Press), is the recipient of the prestigious Flannery O’Connor Award for this book, to go with an earlier PEN/O. Henry Prize.   “How rare is the writer who truly understands invisibility: the invisibility of being young and the very different sort that plagues those grown old; the fraught invisibility of motherhood and that of being a girl in this world who is disappearing from the inside out. Kirsten Sundberg Lunstrum sees these people, gives them form and substance through language that is graceful and nuanced, at times humorous, nearly always compassionate, often (enough) hopeful. A beautiful, deeply compelling collection.” —Lori Ostlund. Sarah Cannon’s memoir, The Shame of Losing (Red Hen Press), is a testament to resilience and life in the face of considerable personal and  familial trauma. “Sarah Cannon’s memoir navigates trauma’s juggernaut in a way so compelling the reader witnesses the opening catastrophe through the lens of her experience. The sense of attunement to her journey continues throughout the aftermath of the initial crisis. Over time, Sarah comes to know herself in the context of her profoundly altered life. With fierce unflinching grist, she faces the unrelenting learning her struggle demands and emerges with discerning clarity. Her courage is palpable and inspires. ”— Joan Fiset.  “This book sings! I could NOT stop reading.” -Rebecca Brown.
 

02/05/2019 - 7:00pm

Central Seattle Public Library
Jack Nisbet
Central Seattle Public Library
1000 Fourth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98104
Historian Jack Nisbet returns to Seattle to discuss his new book, The Dreamer and the Doctor: A Forest Lover and a Physician on the Edge of the Frontier (Sasquatch). This new book, set in the turn-of-the-twentieth-century Northwest, is the story of American public health advocate Dr. Carrie Leiberg and her Swedish husband, a self-taught naturalist who transformed himself from a pickax Idaho prospector to special field agent for the US Forest Commission and warned Washington DC of ecological devastation of public lands. The Leiberg story opens a window into the human and natural landscape of a century past that reflects all the thorny issues of our present time. Jack Nisbet, who received a Robert Gray Medal from the Washington State Historical Society in 2018,  is the author of several collections of essays that explore the human and natural history of the Northwest, including Visible Bones, and Ancient Places. He has also written award-winning biographies of fur agent and cartographer David Thompson (Sources of the River) and naturalist David Douglas (The Collector). Free admission, no tickets are needed. Co-presented with the SEATTLE PUBLIC LIBRARY.     more information  
 

02/06/2019 - 7:30pm

Temple De Hirsch Sinai
Sold Out - John and Julie Gottman with Bill Radke
Temple De Hirsch Sinai
1441 16th Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Please note: This event is now sold out. Happily ever after is not by chance. Award-winning marriage researchers and bestselling authors Drs. John and Julie Schwartz Gottman, co-authors of Eight Dates: Essential Conversations for a Lifetime of Love (Workman) contend that lifelong happiness happens by choice—the choice each person in a relationship makes to remain open, remain curious, and, most of all, to keep talking to one another. The Gottmans appear tonight in conversation with KUOW’s Bill Radke, host of The Record and Week In Review. Dr. John Gottman is renowned worldwide for his work on marital stability and divorce prediction. He has conducted 40 years of breakthrough research with thousands of couples, and his work on marriage and parenting has earned him numerous awards, including four National Institute of Mental Health Research Scientist Awards, the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy Distinguished Research Scientist Award, and many more. Dr. Julie Gottman is the co-founder and President of the Gottman Institute, and Clinical Supervisor for the Couples Together Against Violence study. She is a highly respected clinical psychologist, and she is sought after internationally by media organizations as an expert adviser on marriage, parenting, gay and lesbian adoption, domestic violence, and many other topics. She is the author or co-author of five books, and was named Washington State Psychologist of the Year in 2002. Co-presented with TOWN HALL SEATTLE.   Tickets and information  
 

02/07/2019 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Thomas Kohnstamm
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Thomas Kohnstamm’s debut novel, Lake City (Counterpoint) is indeed a book of ‘our’ Lake City - and is quite the book. Coming after a memoir, Do Travel Writers Go To Hell?, this is one of the deepest, richest, most astute Seattle-set novels we’ve seen. “Kohnstamm delivers a blistering, clear-eyed, and surefooted debut novel about the perils and pitfalls of misdirected ambition. More than that, Lake City is a hilarious and sneakily incisive examination of the cultural tensions, and widening class divides that simmer on the fringes of an increasingly homogenized Seattle—or San Francisco, or Brooklyn, or Los Angeles, or any other American city in the throes of affluenza and gentrification.” —Jonathan Evison. “Kohnstamm has written a novel of Pale Male Fail above and below the poverty line, a Dickensian tale of a fledgling philosopher who’s taken flight from trailer parks to Gramercy Park and then . . . had his wings clipped. This is the American Dream cut thin on a grocery store meat slicer, laced with oxy, stolen booze, and an unfinished dissertation. It’s a rotgut to Dom Pérignon rainbow, which is to say: Lake City is a crucial black comedy about the myths of money and happiness, and whether nature, nurture, or AmEx rears a better man.” —Maria Dahvana Headley.
 

02/07/2019 - 7:30pm

Hugo House
Madeline DeFrees Celebration
Hugo House
1634 11th Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
This evening brings Anastacia-Renee, Susan Rich, Vanessa DeWolf, Abigail Pollokoff, Arianne True, Natasha Kochicheril Moni, and Belle Randall to the Hugo House stage, where they’ll join editor Ann McDuffie to celebrate publication of Where the Horse Takes Wing: The Uncollected Poems of Madeline DeFrees (Two Sylvias Press). Madeline DeFrees was a great, gracious presence over the decades here, reading and attending numerous times at Elliott Bay. Presented by HUGO HOUSE. 
 

02/08/2019 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Cancelled - Dana Frank
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
A professor of history emerita at the University of California, Santa Cruz, with a long, distinguished record of teaching and books on labor and political history, both the U.S. and Latin America, Dana Frank makes this welcome return for a timely book on a place that is having an impact on the U.S., though precious little attention is being given, Honduras. This she does in The Long Honduran Night: Resistance, Terror, and the United States in the Aftermath of the Coup (Haymarket). "A historian and activist offers a damning indictment of corruption, human rights violations, and failed U.S. policy in Honduras. Frank offers a heady mix of personal experience, historical context, and contemporary condemnation of the chain of events that brought Honduras into a state of chaos … An important, little-known history that offers much truth and little reconciliation." −Kirkus Reviews. “Dana Frank has written a searing portrait of a nation in crisis, a book that is startling, enraging, and humane all at once. Her most important accomplishment is never losing sight of the hardships and treachery that ordinary Hondurans have had to endure these last several years, nor the dignity with which they have survived it all.” −Daniel Alarcón
 

02/09/2019 - 10:00am

Seattle Art Museum
Cancelled - Saturday University with Jia-chen Fu
Seattle Art Museum
1300 First Avenue
Seattle, WA 98101
Saturday University ROOTS OF CULTURE: ESSENTIAL PLANTS OF ASIA Winter Lecture Series. This morning the  Saturday University morning winter series on plants and culture in Asia continues with Jia-chen Fu, Associate Professor of Chinese at Emory University, and author of The Other Milk: Soy, Science, and Sovereignty in Modern China (University of Washington Press). Her lecture topic is “Soybean Worlds.” Presented by the GARDNER CENTER FOR ASIAN ART AND IDEAS, in partnership with the UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON JACKSON SCHOOL OF INTERNATIONAL STUDIES, SEATTLE UNIVERSITY and ELLIOTT BAY BOOK COMPANY.   information and tickets  
 

02/09/2019 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Cancelled - Peg Edera
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Please note: This event has been cancelled due to weather concerns but is likely to be rescheduled for March 3rd. Please check our calendar for more information. Portland poet Peg Edera visits with a recent book of poems, Love Is Deeper Than Distance: Poems of love, death, a little sex, ALS, dementia and the widow’s life thereafter (Fernwood Press), a collection whose subtitle lays it all out pretty directly, even as the work is moving. “Love these poems for their magical discovery of love’s perennial voltage despite lost life. By wild honesty, here the good goes on in new forms. Our culture is filled with love songs, and equally filled with silence about loss. What’s often missing in both realms is present in these poems—detailed reporting on the enigmas of true connection: a proposal in the dark . . . a squad car filled with lilacs . . . tears saved for the right time . . . toast and honey . . . all we can do with the impossible . . . and the Temple of What Is Next. Peg Edera’s poems offer the tough tenderness it takes to live through hard times.” —Kim Stafford.
 
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
 
 
 

02/13/2019 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Cancelled - Sharma Shields with Katrina Carrasco & Anca Szilágyi
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
DUE TO INCLEMENT WEATHER THIS EVENT HAS BEEN CANCELLED. Spokane fiction writer Sharma Shields, author of the story collection Favorite Monster and the Washington State Book Award-winning novel, The Sasquatch Hunters’ Almanac, is here tonight to read from her new, World War II-era novel, The Cassandra (Henry Holt). "The Cassandra feels powerfully—chillingly—relevant to our own political moment, even as it unfolds against the bleak splendor of the 1940s American West. It’s a harrowing story, beautifully told, of patriarchy and violence intertwining to make a combustible monster; and of the woman who speaks the truth about this monster, only to be dismissed as unhinged." --Leni Zumas. "The Cassandra is a magnificent exploration of the consequences—both incredible and devastating—of human ingenuity and human intuition. This novel is full of magic and hope, even while it brings up to the light some of our darkest past." --Ramona Ausubel. Here with Sharma Shields this evening will be Seattle writer Anca Szilágyi, author of the novel, Daughters of the Air (Lanternfish Press), and, down from Port Townsend, Katrina Carrasco, whose debut novel, The Best Bad Things (MCD/Farrar, Straus & Giroux) was published earlier this year.
 

02/14/2019 - 6:30pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Underground YA Book Group grades 6 – 12
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Please join us for an ongoing discussion series with no assigned books, moderated by the (teen) readers themselves, with Elliott Bay booksellers on hand to assist, and provide fun things like exclusive access to early copies of forthcoming titles. The plan is to meet the second Thursday of each month.   learn more
 

02/14/2019 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Duncan Ryuken Williams with Frank Abe & Tetsuden Kashima
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
The mass incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II is not only a tale of injustice; it is a moving story of faith. In American Sutra: A Story of Faith and Freedom in the Second World War (Harvard/Belknap), Duncan Ryūken Williams reveals how, even as they were stripped of their homes and imprisoned in camps, Japanese American Buddhists launched one of the most inspiring defenses of religious freedom in our nation’s history, insisting that they could be both Buddhist and American. An ordained Buddhist priest in the Soto Zen tradition, Duncan Ryūken Williams has spent years piecing together the story of the Japanese American community during World War II. A renowned scholar of Buddhism. His previous books including The Other Side of Zen. “American Sutra tells the story of how Japanese American Buddhist families like mine survived the wartime incarceration. Their loyalty was questioned, their freedom taken away, but their spirit could never be broken. A must-read for anyone interested in the implacable quest for civil liberties, social and racial justice, religious freedom, and American belonging.”—George Takei, actor, director, and activist. The author appears in conversation with Seattle writer Frank Abe, author most recently of John Okada and Tetsuden Kashima, Professor Emeritus of American Ethnic Studies at the University of Washington, author of Judgment without Trial. 
 

02/15/2019 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Richard Wiley
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
One of the first writers to read here, back in the mid-1980s, Richard Wiley, author of the PEN/Faulkner Award-winning Soldiers in Hiding, has read here many years and times since, as he’s lived and taught in Las Vegas and Los Angeles, but always returned to his hometown of Tacoma. That is the setting of his fine new book, Tacoma Stories (Bellevue Literary Press). “Wiley’s antic, wrenching collection of 14 interlocking stories reveals the subtle connections among a dozen characters whose unpredictable lives evolve through the decades in the title city. . . . [It] provides a tentatively affirmative answer to the question raised by a fictional version of the daughter of Orson Welles and Rita Hayworth: ‘Do you think a town can act as a hedge against the unabated loneliness of the human heart?’” — Publishers Weekly. “It’s a strange and winsome feeling I have, reading Tacoma Stories, the blue sensation that Richard Wiley has made me homesick for a place I’ve never been, mourning the loss of friends I never had, in a life where each and every one of us is loved, however imperfectly. Think Sherwood Anderson inhabiting Raymond Carver’s Northwest and you’ll have a clear picture of Wiley’s accomplishment.” — Bob Shacochis.
 

02/16/2019 - 10:00am

Seattle Art Museum
Saturday University with Tariq Omar Ali
Seattle Art Museum
1300 First Avenue
Seattle, WA 98104
Saturday University ROOTS OF CULTURE: ESSENTIAL PLANTS OF ASIA Winter Lecture Series. This morning the Saturday University morning winter series on plants and culture in Asia continues with Tariq Omar Ali, Assistant Professor of History at the University of Illinois, and author of the recent book, A Local History of Global Capital (Princeton University Press). His lecture subject is to be “Jute and Peasant Life in the Bengal Delta.” Presented by the GARDNER CENTER FOR ASIAN ART AND IDEAS, in partnership with the UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON JACKSON SCHOOL OF INTERNATIONAL STUDIES, SEATTLE UNIVERSITY and ELLIOTT BAY BOOK COMPANY.   information and tickets  
 

02/16/2019 - 7:00pm

Central Seattle Public Library
Marlon James
Central Seattle Public Library
1000 Fourth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98104
One of the most marvelous books to come along in some time, MAN Booker Prize-winning novelist Marlon James’ epic new novel, Black Leopard, Red Wolf (Riverhead), is the riveting, projected first volume of a three-book Dark Star trilogy, an epic cycle of novels drawing on aspects of African mythology, history, folklore. “James’ sensual, beautifully rendered prose and sweeping, precisely detailed narrative cast their own transfixing spell upon the reader. He not only brings a fresh multicultural perspective to a grand fantasy subgenre, but also broadens the genre’s psychological and metaphysical possibilities. If this first volume is any indication, James’ trilogy could become one of the most talked-about and influential adventure epics since George R.R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire was transformed into Game of Thrones.” —Kirkus Reviews. “Black Leopard, Red Wolf is the kind of novel I never realized I was missing until I read it. A dangerous, hallucinatory, ancient Africa, which becomes a fantasy world as well-realized as anything Tolkien made, with language as powerful as Angela Carter’s. It’s as deep and crafty as Gene Wolfe, bloodier than Robert E. Howard, and all Marlon James. It’s something very new that feels old, in the best way. I cannot wait for the next installment.” —Neil Gaiman.   “This book begins like a fever dream and merges into world upon world of deadly fairy tales rich with political magic. Black Leopard, Red Wolf is a fabulous cascade of storytelling. Sink right in. I guarantee you will be swept downstream.” —Louise Erdrich. Co-presented by the NORTHWEST AFRICAN AMERICAN MUSEUM, SEATTLE PUBLIC LIBRARY, and ELLIOTT BAY. Free admission is on a first-come, first-serve basis.   more information  
 
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
 

02/18/2019 - 7:00pm

Northwest African American Museum
Casey Gerald
Northwest African American Museum
2300 S Massachusetts Street
Seattle, WA 98144
A Seattle trip for other purposes affords this special chance to present Casey Gerald, author of one of the most compelling memoirs of life and its transformations to come along in some time, There Will Be No Miracles Here (Riverhead). “This is the book for all of us who have juggled double (and triple, and quadruple) consciousnesses, and for those of us who have prayed to false gods and passed as false selves. Casey Gerald leads us through blackness and boyhood, love and masculinity, faith and privilege, on his journey toward the only self who could write these fierce and luminous pages. This book is fire.” –Danzy Senna.   “From the first line of this astonishing book, we know we are in for a trip we’ve never gone on before in memoir. The book braids, un-braids and re-braids threads of the personal, the political and the philosophical, in a voice that is ironically comedic and at the same time wholly sincere. There Will Be No Miracles Here is a glowing literary event.” –Kiese Laymon. Co-presented by NORTHWEST AFRICAN AMERICAN MUSEUM and ELLIOTT BAY BOOK COMPANY, with thanks to THE SEATTLE PUBLIC LIBRARY for assistance. Free admission. 
 

02/18/2019 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Mia Ayumi Malhotra with Gabrielle Bates & Jane Wong
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
A poet who, as an MFA graduate of the University of Washington, once called Seattle home, Mia Ayumi Malhotra is here with her Alice James Award-winning debut collection, Isako Isako (Alice James Books). “Mia Malhotra labors in the mythic burdens and beauties of an ancestral story, delivering a vision that proliferates beyond the usual borders between generations, nations, or collective eras of psychic trauma. In these poems, haunted equally by historical event and the timelessness of human suffering, we find a stunning imagination at work on the sacred task of bodying forth, through an uncommon compassion, the stories that history might otherwise eclipse. The multiplicities here are deeply felt through the invention of the transgenerational consciousness of Isako–she who suffers recurringly all the bitter privations of war, starvation, exile. In lyrics that leap, stutter and start again, the reader feels Isako’s voice both across and poignantly through the confines of literal time and place. Malhotra’s poetry demonstrates what is still best in us, the counterpart to cruelty coming back in the surviving descendant’s intimacies and empathies, her innovations in language and, ultimately, love.” —Pimone Triplett. Reading with her this evening will be poets Gabrielle Bates and Jane Wong. Gabrielle Bates hails from Birmingham, lives here in Seattle, where she is managing editor of the Seattle Review, a contributing editor for Poetry Northwest, and social media manager with our friends at Open Books: A Poetry Emporium. She has had/will have work in the New Yorker, POETRY, Best American Experimental Writing 2019, and more. Jane Wong now teaches at Western Washington, and is author of the extraordinary debut collection, Overpour (Action). We can’t wait for whatever will come next.
 

02/19/2019 - 6:30pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Speculations Sci-Fi & Fantasy Book Group
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
This monthly, ongoing, Elliott Bay-hosted book group will be discussing Becky Chambers', The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet (Wayfarers #1) (Harper Voyager), as the February selection.   Learn More
 

02/19/2019 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Tara Conklin
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Tara Conklin reads from her second novel, The Last Romantics (Harper), in which a renowned poet, when asked about the inspiration behind her iconic work, reveals a story about her family and a betrayal that has long lasting effects. “It is a brave thing to write in the voice of a world-renowned centenarian poet, but damn if Tara Conklin doesn’t pull it off. In fact, all of the luxuriously spun characters in The Last Romantics, entwined via that impossible web we call family, unfold over their many years with the perfect balance of familiarity and wonder that makes turning their pages such a pleasure." -Laurie Frankel.
 

02/20/2019 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Wendy Willis & David Biespiel
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Two excellent Oregon poets visit tonight, one, Wendy Willis, on the occasion of a timely new book of essays, These Are Strange Times, My Dear: Field Notes from the Republic (Counterpoint Press). David Biespiel will be here with his newest book in the University of Washington Press’ Pacific Northwest Poetry series, Republic Café. “Offers a unique vision for life in such challenging times . . . Willis’s nuanced and interior approach to politics is a welcome departure from the harsh rhetoric so popular today. Even readers who disagree with her will appreciate her sincerity and experiences as a mother, lawyer, and author.” —Library Journal. “Her best essays combine rigor with sensory observation, ranging widely among varied interests . . . A compassionate, measured voice that serves as an antidote to strident pontificating.” —Kirkus Reviews. Wendy Willis’ poetry collections are A Late, Long Pledge and Blood Sisters of the Republic.   "David Biespiel reinvents poetry in Republic Café by mating a love poem with a historical narrative. A moment in time, a self within it―together the size of a pinprick―are revealed here to be as infinite as the universe. Nothing escapes the net this poet casts out with his powerful form and original vision. Transcendent, mysterious, and as supernatural as it is completely human, this is poetry that transforms the reader."―Laura Kasischke. His other collections include The Education of a Young Poet, Wild Civility, The Book of Men and Women, and Charming Gardeners.
 

02/20/2019 - 7:00pm

Northwest African American Museum
Ayesha Harruna Attah
Northwest African American Museum
2300 S Massachusetts Street
Seattle, WA 98144
A writer who is from Accra, Ghana, who schooled in the U.S. (Mount Holyoke, Columbia, NYU), and now lives in Senegal, Ayesha Harruna Attah visits with her powerful debut novel, The Hundred Wells of Salaga (Other Press). “Ayesha’s prose is festive, reminiscent of the drumbeats of old, yet with a modern rhythm and pace at its core. Her sentences are firm, muscular, vibrant and well structured, creating an imagery that stays with you long after you have finished reading the novel. Her ability to depict joyful scenes alongside heart-breaking ones is what makes the novel thrive and gives it its exceptional realism. Ayesha’s depiction of the lives of the characters and the description of the novel’s setting and atmosphere is so incisive the reader could almost hear the sounds of the horses and the market, smell the sweat and blood of the slave girl, and even feel as if he or she is walking the streets of Old Salaga. The novel is a rich tapestry of humanity in all its ugliest and glorious forms. This is feminist writing at its best, an homage to Queen Amina and Yaa Asantewaa, women whose gallantry defied the status females were relegated to in mid to late nineteenth-century West Africa.” —Mohammed Naseehu Ali. “Compelling…rich and nuanced…Attah is adept at leading readers across the varied terrain of 19th-century Ghana and handles heavy subjects with aplomb. Two memorable women anchor this pleasingly complicated take on slavery, power, and freedom.” —Kirkus Reviews.   Co-presented by NORTHWEST AFRICAN AMERICAN MUSEUM and ELLIOTT BAY BOOK COMPANY. Free admission. 
 

02/21/2019 - 7:00pm

Hugo House
Sophia Shalmiyev with Claire Dederer
Hugo House
1634 11th Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Portland writer Sophia Shalmiyev, originally from Leningrad, is here as the author of a brilliant new memoir, Mother Winter (Simon & Schuster). She’ll be joined in conversation by acclaimed memoir author Claire Dederer, whose most recent book is Love and Trouble. “A rich tapestry of autobiography and meditations on feminism, motherhood, art, and culture, this book is as intellectually satisfying as it is artistically profound. A sharply intelligent, lyrically provocative memoir.” —Kirkus Reviews on Mother Winter. Presented by HUGO HOUSE. For more information, please see www.hugohouse.org.
 

02/21/2019 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
We’re pleased to welcome queer activist, novelist, literary curator and truth teller Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore back to Seattle today to celebrate--at last--the recent release of Sketchtasy (Arsenal Pulp), a novel based in part on her experiences in Boston during the 1990s. Sketchtasy was named one of NPR’s Best Books of 2018 and received rave reviews from The Millions, Shelf Awareness, Boston Globe to name just a few. Welcome home, Mattilda!   “As stupefying and white-hot as the drugs coursing through Alexa’s veins, Sycamore’s latest is a love letter to and a formal complaint about the glitter and horror of the 1990s.” —ALA Booklist. Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore’s previous books include: The End of San Francisco (City Lights), winner of a Lambda Literary Award, and Why Are Faggots So Afraid of Faggots?: Flaming Challenges to Masculinity, Objectification, and the Desire to Conform (AK Press), an American Library Association Stonewall Honor Book. Co-presented at ELLIOTT BAY BOOK COMPANY with HUGO HOUSE.
 

02/22/2019 - 7:00pm

Hugo House
Kathleen Alcalá, Casandra López, & Isabel Quintero
Hugo House
1634 11th Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Kathleen Alcalá, Casandra López, and Isabel Quintero, working most recently in the forms of memoir, poetry, and children’s books, respectively, read from their recent work. Kathleen Alcalá is the author of The Deepest Roots: Finding Food and Community on a Pacific Northwest Island (University of Washington Press). Casandra López has just seen her debut full-length poetry collection, Brother Bullet (University of Arizona Press). Isabel Quintero, this past year, had Ugly Cat and Pablo and the Missing Brother (Scholastic) published. Presented by HUGO HOUSE. For more information, please see www.hugohouse.org.
 

02/22/2019 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Charlie Jane Anders
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
We are delighted as all get-out to present this evening with Nebula Award-winning fiction writer Charlie Jane Anders, here with her dazzling, new novel, The City in the Middle of the Night (Tor Books). What human life might be like on a radically damaged planet is given voice and vision here, to telling ends.   "An even stronger novel than Anders’ Nebula Award–winning All the Birds in the Sky; a tale that can stand beside such enduring works as Ursula K. Le Guin’s The Left Hand of Darkness, Frank Herbert’s Dune, and Dan Simmons’ Hyperion." —Booklist. “A wildly inventive, inventively radical, radically subtle rush of a novel.” —Audrey Niffenegger. “A breathtaking work of imagination and storytelling… making the case for Anders as this generation’s Le Guin.”—Andrew Sean Greer.
 

02/23/2019 - 4:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Megan Griswold
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
The Book of Help (Rodale) traces one woman's life-long quest for love, connection and peace of mind. A heartbreakingly vulnerable and tragically funny memoir-in-remedies, Megan Griswold's narrative spans four decades and six continents — from the glaciers of Patagonia and the psycho-tropics of Brazil, to academia, the Ivy league, & the study of Eastern medicine.   "In a world full of spiritual seekers, Megan Griswold is an undisputed All-Star. She has spent her life examining her existence in patient, courageous, and microscopic detail, and now she has written about her search with tender and comic honesty. What a delightful journey!" --Elizabeth Gilbert, author of Big Magic and Eat, Pray, Love.
 

02/23/2019 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Dani Shapiro
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
There are memoirs of family and there are memoirs of family. Dani Shapiro, a much-admired writing teacher, and acclaimed author of several novels, had written a number of memoirs, probably thinking she had written her way through the form. Lo and behold, a genealogy test that came by mail-order, and what it set in motion. In her extraordinary new book, Inheritance: A Memoir of Genealogy, Paternity, and Love (Knopf), she beautifully and movingly navigates all manner of mystery and wonder, an exploration that affects her own being, her husband and son, her family, and people she had never thought she’d be in touch with for the reasons she does. “When Dani Shapiro discovers, purely by accident, that the father who raised her was not her biological father, she embarks upon a profound journey of understanding.  What is ancestry? What is identity? Inheritance is a compulsively-readable investigation into selfhood that burrows to the heart of what it means to accept, to love, and to belong.”—Anthony Doerr. “Inheritance is Dani Shapiro at her best: a gripping genetic detective story, and a meditation on the meaning of parenthood and family.  It raises profound questions about the quandaries and responsibilities engendered by our newfound ability to know what—and whom—we are made of.” —Jennifer Egan. Co-presented with HEDGEBROOK.
 
24
25
26
27
28
1
2

02/24/2019 - 3:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Toni Yuly
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Bremerton, Washington children’s book illustrator and artist Toni Yuly returns today with another wonderful book for the youngest booklovers (and those who love them). A former librarian, she is the author/illustrator of 6 children’s books, all of which bring us close to the natural world. Her books, Thank You, Bees; The Jelly Bean Tree; Cat Nap; Night Owl; and Early Bird are much loved here, and we’re glad to welcome her to celebrate the publication of The Whole Wide World and Me (Candlewick). “Eye-catching, perspective-shifting illustrations pair beautifully with simple text to embrace a child's world...Bold colors frame but do not overtake the gentle story, and the composition of each spread deserves close attention--Yuly carefully balances white space and color and zooms out from macro focus to wide angle to demonstrate scale and perspective. A story that ends as it begins--colorful, peaceful, and just right for the very youngest naturalists. --Kirkus Reviews . Children and adults are both encouraged to attend today.
 

02/25/2019 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Preview & Discussion of VALERIA LUISELLI’s New Novel with ANGÉLICA CHÁZARO & KRISTEN MILLARES YOUNG
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Please note: Valeria Luiselli will not be present at this event. This evening’s discussion of writer Valeria Luiselli’s astonishing new novel, Lost Children Archive (Knopf) features two individuals who can speak with knowledge and conviction of the circumstances around this novel’s subject matter, along with Valeria Luiselli’s powerful essay, Tell Me How It Ends (Coffee House Press). The novel released on February 12 to much praise and attention, and Valeria Luiselli is slated to appear in Seattle Arts & Lectures’ Literary Series on April 17 at Benaroya Hall (see www.lectures.org for tickets/information). This discussion should help draw attention to a book that artfully, eloquently speaks to many pressing issues of this time, particularly what is happening on the U.S. border with Mexico. A writer who is originally from Mexico, Valeria Luiselli makes the road trip of a young family into a devastating portrait of what is happening now. Her appearance in April is a must-see, and this book, a vital, beautiful, charged, must-read. Tonight’s speakers are University of Washington law professor Angélica Cházaro, whose background has included much work on immigration policy. Prior to teaching at UW, she was a staff attorney with the Northwest Immigrant Rights Project. Kristen Millares Young has a novel, Subduction, forthcoming from Red Hen Press. An essayist, critic, and  award-winning journalist who is presently Prose Writer-in-Residence at Hugo House, she has had work included in the anthology, Latina Outsiders: Remaking Latina Identity. “Superb, powerful, eloquent. Juxtaposing rich, poetic prose with direct storytelling, and alternating narratives with photos, documents, poems, maps, and music, Lost Children Archive  explores what holds a family and society together, and what pulls them apart. The novel begins with a family embarking on a road trip, and culminates in an indictment of the tragic shortcomings of the immigration process. Luiselli demonstrates how callousness toward other cultures erodes our own. Her novel makes a devastating case for compassion.” —Publishers Weekly. “Impossibly smart, full of beauty, heart and insight, Lost Children Archive is a novel about archiving all that we don’t want to lose. Luiselli looks into the American present as well as its history: into Native American history, and the many intersections between American and Mexican history that are and have always been there. This is the perfect American road trip novel for right now. Everyone should read this book.” —Tommy Orange. Co-presented by SEATTLE ARTS & LECTURES and ELLIOTT BAY BOOK COMPANY.
 

02/26/2019 - 7:00pm

Central Seattle Public Library
Michael Ondaatje
Central Seattle Public Library
1000 Fourth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98104
Michael Ondaatje is a writer whose books, for eager readers, don’t come often enough. He is also, as an eminent, excellent reader about his own work, as well as one of those who is curious and knows much about literature and the world, someone whose public appearances don’t seem to come often enough, either. We are grateful and delighted to finally be presenting him here this evening for his exquisite, extraordinary new novel, Warlight (Knopf). Published last spring to high international praise, this is an unforgettable novel of mystery and forms of longing and betrayal against a backdrop of World War II Britain.   “Warlight is a quiet new masterpiece from Michael Ondaatje…An elegiac thriller [with] the immediate allure of a dark fairy tale. In Warlight, all is illuminated, at first dimly then starkly, but always brilliantly.” —Anna Mundow, The Washington Post.   “[An] intricate and absorbing novel. . . . This is a book rich with detail. The reader is bound to be conscious of a hidden ballast of research, the seven-eighths of the iceberg without which the thing would founder, but so deft is the writing that you forget this, simply appreciating the meticulous background that brings alive a time and a place. —Penelope Lively, The New York Times Book Review.   The author of numerous award-winning novels, collections of poetry, a memoir, Michael Ondaatje’s novel, The English Patient, received the 1992 Booker Prize, and the Golden Man Booker Prize in 2018. It will be a pleasure and honor to have him here once again this evening. Free admission is on a first-come, first-serve basis. Co-presented by THE SEATTLE PUBLIC LIBRARY and ELLIOTT BAY BOOK COMPANY.    more information  
 

02/26/2019 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Rebecca Robinson & Stephen E. Strom
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
President Barack Obama established Bears Ears National Monument on primarily undeveloped land in Southeastern Utah in 2016, with co-management by BLM, US Forest Service and a coalition of The Navajo Nation, Hopi, Ute Mountain Ute, Ute Indian Tribe of the Uintah and Ouray Reservation and the Pueblo of Zuni. Though President Donald Trump has attempted to reduce the monument by 85%, legal challenges have so far preserved the land. Rebecca Robinson has edited a collection of 22 individual voices and personal histories of those involved in the debate about the future of the monument in her book, Voices from Bears Ears: Seeking Common Ground on Sacred Land (University of Arizona Press). Photographer Stephen Strom, whose photographs also appear in Voices in Bears Ears as well as in his book, Bears Ears: Views from a Sacred Land (University of Arizona Press), has created an awe inspiring visual celebration of the rugged beauty of the canyons, mesas and spires of Bears Ears. Please join us for a conversation with images to learn more about this national treasure.
 

02/27/2019 - 11:30am

The Elliott Bay Book Company
PJ Library Song & Storytime
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Our friends at PJ Library do these song & storytimes designed for tots, toddlers, and those looking after them at a few select bookstores in the area and visit as a regular feature of our Wednesday mornings. These are free and open to all and are usually thirty minutes of good fun, activity, and exploration of language, movement, and rhythm. Please join us in the Children’s Section by the castle!  
 

02/27/2019 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Leigh Calvez
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
The author of a beautiful, bestselling book, The Hidden Lives of Owls, Leigh Calvez is here tonight with her newest, The Breath of a Whale: The Science and Spirit of Pacific Ocean Giants (Sasquatch Books). “The Breath of a Whale is as intimate and spirited as its title. This splendid book offers us the whale watch most of us can only dream of: We get close-up and personal with wild giants, in the company of an expert who feels like a good friend. Because these whales’ individual dramas are so entwined with those of their observer, the insights in these pages are riveting and deeply inspiring. Leigh Calvez offers not only hope for saving these endangered leviathans, but also for saving ourselves.” —Sy Montgomery.
 

02/27/2019 - 7:30pm

Benaroya Hall
Zadie Smith
Benaroya Hall
200 University Street
Seattle, WA 98101
Seattle Arts & Lectures’ 2018-19 Literary Series continues with one of the most esteemed, acclaimed prose writers of our time, Zadie Smith. She is the author of five novels - White Teeth, The Autograph Man, On Beauty, NW, Swing Time - a novella, and two books of essays, the most recent of which is Feel Free (Penguin Press).   “It is exquisitely pleasurable to observe Smith thinking on the page, not least because we have no idea where she’s headed…At times she reminds me of a musician jamming, or one of those enviable cooks who can take five random ingredients lying around the kitchen and whip up a meal. Her loose, roving essays cohere because they are rooted in her sensibility, in what Elizabeth Hardwick called ‘the soloist’s personal signature flowing through the text.’” —The New York Times Book Review. Presented by SEATTLE ARTS & LECTURES.   tickets and information  
 

02/28/2019 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Christie Aschwanden with Greg Hanscom
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
In Good to Go: What the Athlete in All of Us Can Learn from the Strange Science of Recovery (Knopf), acclaimed FiveThirtyEight science writer Christie Aschwanden takes readers on an entertaining and enlightening tour through this strange world. She investigates whether drinking Gatorade or beer after training helps or hinders performance, she examines the latest trends among athletes—from NFL star Tom Brady’s infrared pajamas to gymnast Simone Biles’ pneumatic compression boots to swimmer Michael Phelps’s “cupping” ritual—and she tests some of the most controversial methods herself, including cryochambers, floatation tanks, and infrared saunas. At a time when the latest recovery products and services promise so much, Good to Go seeks answers to the fundamental question: do any of them actually help the body recover and achieve peak performance? Christie Aschwanden appears tonight in conversation with Greg Hanscom, Executive Editor at Crosscut.com and KCTS9.
 

02/28/2019 - 7:00pm

Central Seattle Public Library
Pete Buttigieg
Central Seattle Public Library
1000 4th Avenue
Seattle, WA 98104
The mayor of South Bend, Indiana, Pete Buttigieg, is here with his instructive account of city life, governance, and community, Shortest Way Home: One Mayor’s Challenge and a Model for America’s Future (Liveright/W.W. Norton). “In this uplifting coming-of-age memoir from the American heartland, Pete Buttigieg, successful mayor of revitalized South Bend, Indiana, writes that the shortest distance between opportunity and success, ‘like good literature, takes personal lived experience as its starting point’—a promising axiom for a prospective national figure.” — David Levering Lewis. “Combining candor and compassion with a brilliant understanding of how government can be more effective, Shortest Way Home demonstrates that Pete Buttigieg is not only a key political figure in his generation, but also an appealing and even funny writer. Far from a conventional politician's book, his work is an important entry in the American political tradition for the twenty-first century.” — Walter Isaacson. Free admission, no tickets are needed. Co-presented with the SEATTLE PUBLIC LIBRARY.  More information here.
 
 
 
Add to My Calendar