Saturday, February 1, 2020

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02/01/2020 - 10:00am

Seattle Art Museum
Saturday University with Emma Flatt
Seattle Art Museum
1300 First Avenue
Seattle, WA 98101
This morning the Saturday University morning’s winter series on ‘What is Precious?’ commences with Emma Flatt, professor of history at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and author of the recent book, The Courts of the Deccan Sultanates: Living Well in the Persian Cosmopolis (Cambridge), will speak on ‘Rarities Fit For Kings: Ephemeral and Tangible Precious Goods in Sultanate India.’ Presented by the GARDNER CENTER FOR ASIAN ART AND IDEAS, in partnership with the UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON JACKSON SCHOOL OF INTERNATIONAL STUDIES, the DUNHUANG FOUNDATION, and ELLIOTT BAY BOOK COMPANY.   Tickets
 

02/01/2020 - 11:00am

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Children's Storytime - ages 2 and up
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Our weekly Children’s Storytimes commence for the month with this reading from picture book favorites out of our children’s section. One of our Elliott Bay bookfolk will do the reading and telling honors. Go to the castle in the children’s section…and let the stories begin! Please join us.  
 

02/01/2020 - 2:00pm

Town Hall Forum
Matt Parker
Town Hall Forum
1119 8th Ave (Entrance off Seneca St.)
Seattle, WA 98101
In Humble Pi: When Math Goes Wrong in the Real World (Riverhead), YouTuber and “stand up mathematician” Matt Parker has written a book-length answer to anyone who ever put their hand up in math class and asked, “When am I ever going to use this in the real world?” Exploring and explaining a litany of glitches, near-misses and mathematical mishaps involving the internet, big data, elections, street signs, lotteries, the Roman Empire, and an Olympic team, Parker uncovers the bizarre ways math trips us up, and what this reveals about its essential place in our world. Getting it wrong has never been more fun; Parker’s humorous tone and real-world takeaways have transfixed readers—and even us publishing math-phobes were in stitches and awe of the pervasiveness of math (and numerical blunders) around us. Presented by Town Hall Science in partnership with Elliott Bay Book Company.   Tickets
 

02/01/2020 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Mitzi Szereto
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
The Best New True Crime Stories: Serial Killers (Mango), edited and introduced by Mitzi Szereto, includes many chilling accounts of serial killers operating in many parts of the world. Some were caught and prosecuted, but others have never been identified. Tonight she shares some of these stories and discusses the process of creating the anthology. “This compelling collection of serial killer stories is more than its beautifully told parts—it adds up to a clear and startling portrait of murder as an addiction and the very human demons that haunt the lives of killers and victims alike.”—Deborah Blum.
 
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02/03/2020 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Paul Yoon with Rob Arnold
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
We’ve long been captivated by the haunting novels and short stories of Paul Yoon, whose novel, Snow Hunters, won the 2014 New York Public Library’s Young Lions Fiction Award. He’s here tonight to read from Run Me to Earth (Simon and Schuster), a novel about  three orphaned children trying to survive in chaotic 1960s Laos. After taking shelter in a field hospital, they become rescuers themselves, but the story is far from over. "In another life, Yoon might have been a sculptor, carving the excess off his creations until they're perfect. In this decades-spanning examination of the survival of three orphans with the bad luck to have been born into the ruins of a battlefield, he's stretching his abilities while still writing with deliberate, almost vigilant care... Yoon's imaginative prose and affection for his characters make the story larger than a look at the ways people survive... Another masterpiece in miniature about the unpredictable directions a life can take."--Kirkus Reviews. Paul Yoon’s books include The Mountain (a NPR Best Book of the Year) and Once the Shore, a New York Times Notable Book. Paul Yoon appears on our stage with Rob Arnold, Events Curator at Hugo House.   Co-presented with Hugo House (at the Elliott Bay Book Company).
 

02/04/2020 - 6:30pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Elliott Bay Book Group
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
All who wish to convene in this informally-set, ongoing reading group dedicated to both fiction and non-fiction are welcome to do so. This month’s selection for reading and discussion is William Faulkner’s enduring The Sound and the Fury (Vintage).   learn more  
 

02/04/2020 - 7:00pm

Hugo House
Andrew Zawacki
Hugo House
1634 11th Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Poet Andrew Zawacki reads from his recently published fifth collection, Unsun: f/11 (Coach House Books).  "Here is a language of dizzying swerves and connections, open at the borders, even to bilingual puns." – Rosmarie Waldrop. Free admission, though RSVP advised.
 

02/04/2020 - 7:00pm

Central Seattle Public Library
Sarah Abrevaya Stein
Central Seattle Public Library
1000 Fourth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98104
Award winning historian Sarah Abrevaya Stein, Director of the Alan D. Leve Center for Jewish Studies at UCLA, shares the true story of a frayed and diasporic Sephardic Jewish family preserved in thousands of letters. Her book, Family Papers: A Sephardic Journey Through the Twentieth Century (Farrar, Straus & Giroux) is an account of the Salonic based Levy family, leading publishers and editors who helped chronicle modernity as it was experienced by Sephardic Jewis across the Ottoman Empire. “By turns intimate and expansive, mournful and celebratory, Sarah Abrevaya Stein's Family Papers mines a remarkable trove of letters to detail the dramatically shifting fortunes of one extended Sephardic clan. As she brings us inside the lives and lines of her border-crossing, multigenerational cast of correspondents, Stein also makes expert use of her skills as cultural historian, textual detective, and savvy social cartographer to map the fate of a fading world." --Adina Hoffman.  Co-presented by Seattle Public Library and the Sephardic Studies Program, Stroum Center for Jewish Studies at the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies at the University of Washington.  Free admission. More information, here.
 

02/04/2020 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Charles B. Kastner
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Seattle author and long-distance runner Charles B. Kastner helps uncover some lost history - lost African American history, lost American history, lost Seattle history, lost sporting history - in his captivating new book, Race Across America: Eddie Gardner and the Great Bunion Derbies (Syracuse University Press). In 1928 and 1929, Eddie Gardner, hailing from Seattle, competed and won two cross-country (the whole country) footraces, overcoming much beyond the sheer physical and mental grind to do so, though those things, too. "Race Across America captures the magnitude of challenges faced by Eddie Gardner as he competed in the greatest race on earth: desert heat, hours of mental and physical strain, endless mountains, intense rain, and racial barriers; and the winning spirit it took for him to reach the finish line."—Lorna Michael. "Chuck Kastner masterfully brings to light the story of Eddie Gardner, the first great African American Ultramarathon runner of the 20th Century and in doing so, provides a powerful lesson in American and Civil Rights history."—Gary Corbitt.
 

02/05/2020 - 11:30am

The Elliott Bay Book Company
PJ Library Song & Storytime
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Our friends at PJ Library, which does these song & storytimes designed for tots, toddlers and those looking after them at a few select bookstores here in the area, visit as a regular feature of our Wednesday mornings. These are free and open to all and are usually thirty minutes of good fun, activity and exploration of language, movement and rhythm. Please join us in the Children’s Section by the castle!
 

02/05/2020 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Donna Rifkind
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Those who have followed the story of Hollywood’s Golden Age will know of legendary screenwriter Salka Viertel, friend of Garbo and screenwriter for many films, including the 1933 classic Garbo film, Queen Christina.  Scholar Donna Rifkind’s book, The Sun and Her Stars: Salka Viertel and Hitler's Exiles in the Golden Age of Hollywood (Other Press) is the first complete biography of Viertel, bringing to light Viertel’s role in Hollywood not only as a screenwriter, but as the provider of housing, jobs and financial support for many refugee artists escaping Europe during the Holocaust. A friend and supporter of Eisenstein, Huxley, Brecht, Isherwood and Mann, among others, Salka Viertel’s story is an important one, and well told in this book.  "An immersive biography...Chock-full of scandalous affairs and wartime atmosphere, this sparkling account brings overdue attention to a woman who helped make Hollywood's golden age possible." -- Publishers Weekly. "The unjustly forgotten Salka Viertel, premier memoirist of Hollywood's Golden Age and so much more, gets a vital, comprehensive biography to call her own in Donna Rifkind's lively and engaging The Sun and Her Stars." --Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times.
 

02/06/2020 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Melissa Anne Peterson
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
A writer educated at The Evergreen State College and the University of Montana, who has worked in endangered species recovery along the way, Melissa Anne Peterson is here with an excellent, Pacific Northwest-set debut novel, Vera Violet (Counterpoint). This is the tough coming-of-age story of a group of teenaged people scuffling along in a decaying small Northwest town. “Vera Violet is raw, unflinching, and above all necessary. As the storyline spans the country and scoops up those both broken and beautiful, Peterson gives voice to the unheard and overlooked with an honesty few writers come close to achieving. This is writing that is lyrical in the way a caged animal is lyrical: fierce with a soleness of purpose, distilled, unadorned, and unapologetically alive.—Melissa Mylchreest. “Vera Violet is the most authentic and exciting debut I've read in a long time. At once gritty and jaw-droppingly lyrical, Peterson's voice is a clarion call for the downtrodden and disenchanted. Reading Vera Violet is nothing less than a visceral and stirring experience.—Jonathan Evison.
 

02/07/2020 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Richard Bell
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Published this past fall to considerable praise, University of Maryland historian Richard Bell’s Stolen: Five Free Boys Kidnapped into Slavery and Their Astonishing Odyssey Home (Simon & Schuster) tells some newly revealed 19th-century US history by recounting the story of five boys kidnapped in the north, and smuggled by shady traffickers towards enslavement. This was 1825. This also was the Reverse Underground Railroad. “’BOY LOST,’ read the advertisement placed in a newspaper by the father of one of the five free boys kidnapped in Philadelphia in 1825. Richard Bell’s heartbreaking and searing account of their story chronicles not only the agonies and atrocities of slavery, but the fragility of freedom, and the dauntlessness of resistance.” - Jill Lepore. “Opening an unknown world from an unsung tragedy that started in early national Philadelphia and stretched grimly South, Stolen offers a worm’s eye view of the leviathan of American slavery, and of some of its most dastardly perpetrators and its most remarkable survivors. Richard Bell has researched inventively and mastered a vast body of scholarship, as we would expect from so distinguished a historian. But he also imbues his tale with the deep humanity of a great novelist. Both riveting and heartrending, Stolen joins the great literature of America’s founding tragedy, earning a place alongside the work of Harriet Beecher Stowe, Edward P. Jones, and Toni Morrison.” – Jane Kamensky.
 

02/08/2020 - 10:00am

Seattle Art Museum
Saturday University with Yukio Lippit
Seattle Art Museum
1300 First Avenue
Seattle, WA 98101
This morning the Saturday University morning’s winter series on ‘What is Precious?’ continues with Yukio Lippit, professor of History of Art and Architecture at Harvard and Faculty Director of the Arts at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. Recent books include Japanese Zen Buddhism and the Impossible Painting (Getty) and The Artist in Edo (National Gallery of Art). His subject today is ‘Woodwork and the Arts of Japan.’ Presented by the GARDNER CENTER FOR ASIAN ART AND IDEAS, in partnership with the UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON JACKSON SCHOOL OF INTERNATIONAL STUDIES, the DUNHUANG FOUNDATION, and ELLIOTT BAY BOOK COMPANY.   Tickets
 

02/08/2020 - 11:00am

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Children's Storytime - ages 2 and up
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Join us for this fun hour of readings from picture and storybooks. Just go to the castle in the children’s section...and let the stories begin!
 

02/08/2020 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Garth Greenwell with Christopher Frizzelle
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Novelist Garth Greenwell first visited Elliott Bay to read from his debut, What Belongs to You, which was a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner Award and won the British Book Award for Debut of the Year. Tonight is his much anticipated return, to read from Cleanness (Farrar, Straus and Giroux), which has quickly become one of the most talked about and lauded novels of 2020. In Cleanness, which is set in Sophia, Bulgaria, an American teacher navigates a life transformed by the discovery and loss of love. “As he prepares to leave the place he's come to call home, he grapples with the intimate encounters that have marked his years abroad, each bearing uncanny reminders of his past. A queer student's confession recalls his own first love, a stranger's seduction devolves into paternal sadism, and a romance with another foreigner opens, and heals, old wounds. Each echo reveals startling insights about what it means to seek connection: with those we love, with the places we inhabit, and with our own fugitive selves.”  "Cleanness is an impressive book: moving, radical, both beautiful and violent, unexpected. Garth Greenwell is a major writer, and his writing provides us tools to affirm ourselves, to exist-- to fight."--Édouard Louis.   Garth Greenwell appears in conversation with Christopher Frizzelle, longtime editor and writer at The Stranger.
 
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02/09/2020 - 3:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Maureen R. Elenga
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Maureen Elenga, architectural historian and author of Seattle Architecture, speaks this afternoon about the history of Seattle bridges, the subject of her new book, Bridges of Seattle (Arcadia).  Nine bridges included in this book are listed in the National Register of Historic Places. They include the José Rizal Bridge (Washington’s oldest steel arch bridge) and all four of the Lake Washington Ship Canal bascule bridges). The city’s Department of Transportation maintains over 250 vehicular and pedestrian bridges, and this account of some of the more historically significant among them is a worthy addition to books about the city’s history.
 

02/10/2020 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Emma Copley Eisenberg with Michael Hobbes
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Emma Copley Eisenberg’s book, The Third Rainbow Girl: The Long Life of a Double Murder in Appalachia (Hachette), both the account of the aftermath of the murders of two young women in rural West Virginia and the author’s own experiences living in the area while researching the crime. “The Third Rainbow Girl is a staggering achievement of reportage, memoir, and sociological reckoning. We are better for this brilliant, gorgeous, and deeply humane book."-- Carmen Maria Machado. "Eisenberg has crafted a beautiful and complicated ode to West Virginia. Exquisitely written, this is a powerful commentary on society's notions of gender, violence, and rural America. Readers of literary nonfiction will devour this title in one sitting."-- Booklist. Emma Copley Eisenberg appears in conversation with Michael Hobbes, a Seattle-based reporter for the Huffington Post.
 

02/11/2020 - 6:30pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Global Issues Book Group
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
This month’s selection is Eric Klinenberg's, Palaces for the People: How Social Infrastructure Can Help Fight Inequality, Polarization, and the Decline of Civic Life (Broadway Books).   learn more
 

02/11/2020 - 7:00pm

Hugo House
Natanya Ann Pulley
Hugo House
1634 11th Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Navajo (Diné) fiction writer Natanya Pulley visits with her short story collection, With Teeth (New Rivers Press). “Part creation myth, part surreal horror story, part smart parable of the consumption and commodification of vulnerable bodies, With Teeth, in all of its wry humor, shapeshifting, and haunting violence, heralds the debut of a remarkable and endlessly-imaginative voice.” —Lee Ann Roripaugh. Free admission, though RSVP advised.
 

02/12/2020 - 11:30am

The Elliott Bay Book Company
PJ Library Song & Storytime
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Our friends at PJ Library, who do these song & storytimes designed for tots, toddlers, and those looking after them at a few select bookstores here in the area, visit as a regular feature of our Wednesday mornings. These are free and open to all and are usually thirty minutes of good fun, activity, and exploration of language, movement, and rhythm. Please join us in the Children’s Section by the castle!  
 

02/12/2020 - 6:00pm

The Riveter: Capitol Hill
Rebekah Bastian with Amy Nelson
The Riveter: Capitol Hill
1517 12th Avenue Suite 101
Seattle, WA 98122
Rebekah Bastian – Vice President of Community & Culture at Zillow and Forbes.com contributor – celebrates Blaze Your Own Trail (Berrett-Koehler), a modern, feminist take on the classic choose-your-own-journey book, inspiring readers to embrace the fact that there is no singular right path - just your own. The evening includes an interactive reading in which the audience can participate in deciding where the story leads. This reading, followed by a fireside chat with The Riveter’s own Amy Nelson, will reveal to attendees that there are many right paths through life, and that we have the strength to persist through any of them. Attendees receive a limited-edition travel calendar. Presented by the Riveter.   Tickets  
 

02/12/2020 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Robin R. Meyers with Dave Brown
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Robin R. Meyers, the senior minister of Oklahoma City's Mayflower Congregational United Church of Christ and Distinguished Professor of Social Justice Emeritus, Oklahoma City University, speaks this evening about some of the issues he discusses in his new book, Saving God from Religion: A Minister's Search for Faith in a Skeptical Age (Convergent Books). Saving God from Religion advocates moving from a theology of obedience to one of consequence, arguing that we need to stop seeing our actions as a means for pleasing a distant God and rediscover how God has empowered us to care for ourselves and the world. "In this book of stories from four decades of ministry, Meyers powerfully captures what it means to believe in a God who's revealed not in creeds or morals but in the struggles and beauty of our ordinary lives. In unrelenting detail, he shows how all of creation is anointed with the presence of God, before leaving us with the hope that such anointing might also include us." --Richard Rohr. Robin Meyers appears in conversation with Dave Brown, a Tacoma based pastor and member of the Pacific Northwest Interfaith Amigos.
 

02/12/2020 - 7:00pm

Central Seattle Public Library
Courtenay Hameister with Luke Burbank
Central Seattle Public Library
1000 Fourth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98104
Courtenay Hameister, host and head writer for twelve years of Live Wire, lived in a state of near-constant dread and anxiety. She fretted about everything. Her age. Her size. Her romantic prospects. Then, in her mid-forties, she decided to fight back against her debilitating anxieties. She would spend a year doing all the things that scared her -- things that the average person might consider doing for a half second--and then told the story in her book, Okay Fine Whatever: The Year I Went from Being Afraid of Everything to Only Being Afraid of Most Things (now out in a paperback edition from Back Bay/Little Brown).   "I loved this book so hard. Courtenay Hameister makes me feel thrilled to be alive-even though most things in life scare the crap out of me so much it's hard for me to walk out of my own front door. Okay Fine Whatever is a brilliant testament to the fire of the spirit for misfits and scaredy pants everywhere. A soul triumph. A reason to live."-- Lidia Yuknavitch. Courtenay Hameister served for 12 years as host and head writer for Live Wire, a nationally-syndicated public radio show. She appears in conversation with Luke Burbank, co-host of APM podcast Too Beautiful to Live and of the weekly public radio show, Live Wire.  Co-presented with Seattle Public Library. Free admission. Please see www.spl.org for more information.
 

02/12/2020 - 7:30pm

Town Hall Seattle
Diane Rehm with Ross Reynolds
Town Hall Seattle
1119 Eighth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98101
Esteemed NPR radio host Diane Rehm, host many years of the Diane Rehm Show, now host of the weekly NPR podcast On My Mind, returns to Seattle to discuss her newest book, When My Time Comes: Conversations About Whether Those Who Are Dying Should Have the Right to Determine When Life Should End (Knopf). Drawn from her trademark manner of interviewing people - terminally ill patients, physicians, spouses, relatives, ethicists - she gives a reasoned, non-judgemental portrait of this issue, which touches on the mortality of anyone who lives to a certain point of life. A public television documentary chronicling all of this, with Diane Rehm, is forthcoming. Presented by Town Hall Civics in partnership with Elliott Bay Book Company.   Tickets
 

02/13/2020 - 6:30pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Underground YA Book Group grades 6 – 12
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Please join us for an ongoing discussion series with no assigned books, moderated by the (teen) readers themselves, with Elliott Bay booksellers on hand to assist, and provide fun things like exclusive access to early copies of forthcoming titles. The plan is to meet the second Thursday of each month. learn more
 

02/13/2020 - 7:00pm

Hugo House
Christine Hemp
Hugo House
1634 11th Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Port Townsend poet Christine Hemp reads from her debut memoir, Wild Ride Home (Arcade). “How is it possible to read a book with so much death in it and so much joy? Here is a family of people who look life straight in the eyes, a horse who runs circles around sorrow so that sorrow itself laughs out loud, and a writer who is such good company I never wanted the book to end.” —Marie Howe. Free admission, though RSVP advised.
 

02/13/2020 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Siri Carpenter
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Join us as we celebrate the publication of The Craft of Science Writing, published by The Open Notebook, a nonprofit that is a primary resource for science journalists and aspiring science writers. This free event, held during the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, will include a lively discussion with Siri Carpenter and several contributors to this indispensable guide for media professionals, scientists, science educators, and anyone interested in communicating with the public about science.  “Writing is a lonely art. The vast majority of the process, from coming up with ideas to structuring a piece, is carried out in solitude. When you start out, you barely have a clue about what you’re doing, let alone what seasoned professionals get up to. Getting those pros to deconstruct their own methods for all to see is a massive boon to aspiring science writers.” — Ed Yong, author of I Contain Multitudes and science writer at The Atlantic Co-presented by the Northwest Science Writers Association, The Open Notebook, and the Elliott Bay Book Company.
 
 

02/15/2020 - 10:00am

Asian Art Museum
Saturday University with Joel Walker
Asian Art Museum
1400 East Prospect Street
Seattle, WA 98112
This morning the Saturday University morning’s winter series on ‘What is Precious?’ makes the welcome big move back to the renovated Seattle Asian Art Museum in Volunteer Park, continuing with Joel Walker, the Lawrence J. Roseman Associate Professor of History at the University of Washington. He will be speaking on ‘The Dragon and the Pearl: Explorations of a Eurasian Motif.’ Presented by the GARDNER CENTER FOR ASIAN ART AND IDEAS, in partnership with the UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON JACKSON SCHOOL OF INTERNATIONAL STUDIES, the DUNHUANG FOUNDATION, and ELLIOTT BAY BOOK COMPANY.   Tickets
 

02/15/2020 - 11:00am

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Children's Storytime - ages 2 and up
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Join us for this fun hour of readings from picture and storybooks. Go to the castle in the children’s section…and the stories begin!
 

02/15/2020 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Kim Stafford
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
The past if not present Poet Laureate of the state of Oregon, a renowned teacher of writing and poetry, and author of over a dozen works of his own poetry and prose, as well as serving as literary executor for his late father William Stafford’s work, Kim Stafford makes this welcome Elliott Bay return to read from his new book of poems, Wild Honey, Tough Salt (Red Hen Press). “Wild Honey, Tough Salt demonstrates Kim Stafford’s remarkable talent for coming to the heart. These poems rise beautifully and naturally from their settings, whether a morning in a forest, or inside an ancient myth, or high on a ridge above Big Basin. Wild Honey, Tough Salt contains poems of quest, reconciliation, and joy, offering the reader enlightening variations on the essence of heart and self in communion.” --Pattiann Rogers. “Kim Stafford is the most humane poet going, devotedly writing every day, sharing encouragement and generous care everywhere. His eloquent lines, so deeply attentive to each moment, shimmer with breathtaking leaps and humble wisdom. They will help you live. Especially now.” --Naomi Shihab Nye.
 
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02/16/2020 - 3:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Gayle Brandeis & Jennifer Calkins
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Writer Gayle Brandeis, probably most known for her Bellwether Prize-winning novel, The Book of Dead Birds, as well as other excellent works, and Seattle writer, evolutionary biologist, and attorney Jennifer Calkins read together here from just-released books. Gayle Brandeis is here with her powerful Many Restless Concerns: The Victims of Countess Bathory Speak in Chorus (Black Lawrence Press), which recounts the killing of hundreds of women and girls late in the 16th- and then early 17th-centuries.  "'Just know we all have stories worth your time. Just know we're just starting to understand our own worth.' This is how Gayle Brandeis opens Many Restless Concerns. Countess Bathory of Hungary allegedly killed up to 650 girls and women between the years 1585 and 1609, in a variety of cruel, heartless ways. Brandeis brings these words to our attention—stab, strangle, pummel, hack, burn, drown, freeze, scald. 'Your body remembers even when you no longer have a body, some tender part of you still flinches; some immaterial nerves still flare,' she writes. 'We want you to bear witness,' voices the chorus. I urge you, the reader, to bear witness to these centuries of silent voices rising up clearly, often beautifully, more often tragically. Bear witness."—Alma Luz Villanueva. For Jennifer Calkins, it is her novel, Fugitive Assembly (The 3rd Thing). "Fugitive Assemblage is mysterious, restless, searching, flat out beautiful, and finally, heartbreaking. I don’t think I’ve ever read grief in a way that feels so true. And then there is just this absolute pleasure in the language, the atmosphere, the constant move forward through the Southern California landscape and through history. Joan Didion meets Bhanu Kapil meets the films of Kelly Reichardt. It’s like a long, hot day that turns into a harrowing night, and yet at the end, somehow, there is a sense of peace." – Amina Cain.
 

02/16/2020 - 7:30pm

Town Hall Forum
Dennis Baron
Town Hall Forum
1119 8th Ave (Entrance off Seneca St.)
Seattle, WA 98101
University of Illinois emeritus professor of linguistics Dennis Baron visits with a timely book on language and gender, What's Your Pronoun? Beyond He and She (Liveright). “A thorough history of pronoun debates.... Guggenheim fellow Baron examines what seems like a contemporary question with a historical lens. In this primer, he reveals a centuries-long search for a singular gender-neutral pronoun in English, dispelling persistent myths that such a quest is a recent effort or the product of politically correct motivations.... The author's playful tone imbues the text with friendly sensitivity, and readers will appreciate his decades of research and meticulous attention to documents and sources. The result is a book that reflects the transformational capacity of language. A lively book for language lovers, those confused about uses of they/them, and anyone curious about writing while gendered.” --Shirley Brice Heath. Presented by Town Hall Civics in partnership with Elliott Bay Book Company.   Tickets
 

02/17/2020 - 11:30am

The Elliott Bay Book Company
PJ Library Song & Storytime
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Our friends at PJ Library do these song & storytimes designed for tots, toddlers, and those looking after them at a few select bookstores in the area and visit as a regular feature of our Wednesday mornings. These are free and open to all and are usually thirty minutes of good fun, activity, and exploration of language, movement, and rhythm. Please join us in the Children’s Section by the castle!
 

02/18/2020 - 6:30pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Speculations Sci-Fi & Fantasy Book Group
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
This monthly, ongoing, Elliott Bay-hosted book group will be discussing Becky Chambers’, To Be Taught, If Fortunate (Harper Voyager) as the February selection.   Learn More  
 

02/19/2020 - 7:00pm

Hugo House
Courtney Maum
Hugo House
1634 11th Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Novelist (Costalegre) and publishing consultant Courtney Maum is here with a helpful new book on getting work published and what happens after, Before and After the Book Deal: A Writer’s Guide to Finishing, Publishing, Promoting, and Surviving Your First Book (Catapult). Free admission, though RSVP advised.
 

02/19/2020 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Craig Fehrman
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Indiana-based journalist and historian Craig Fehrman’s first book is about how our various presidents have written books, this recounted in his beguiling book, Author in Chief: The Untold Story of Our Presidents and the Books They Wrote (Simon & Schuster). “Craig Fehrman takes us from Thomas Jefferson—a president who happened also to be the best prose stylist around—to the age of the obligatory campaign biography, on to the modern blockbuster. Along the way we meet revisionists, ghost writers (Truman went through four), runaway bestsellers (it seems there was a sport at which Calvin Coolidge excelled), surprising flops.  We learn that the Civil War turned the occasional authorial impulse into a flood of literature; that Nathaniel Hawthorne quietly wrote a campaign biography; that the most literate presidents can meet with the worst reviews. Shapely, original, and brimming in anecdote, Author in Chief expertly illuminates, amid much else, how history finds its way into the books.” —Stacy Schiff. “Entertaining and illuminating . . . Fehrman’s deep research delivers a wealth of intriguing tidbits (Jimmy Carter leased a $12,000 word processor to compose Keeping the Faith; the Committee to Boycott Nixon’s Memoirs sold T-shirts and bumper stickers with the slogan “Don’t Buy Books by Crooks”), which are complemented by a generous selection of illustrations. Bibliophiles and presidential history buffs alike will relish this gratifying deep dive into an underappreciated genre.” —Publishers Weekly.
 

02/19/2020 - 7:30pm

Town Hall Forum
Audrey Delella Benedict, Geoffrey A. Hammerson, Robert W. Butler
Town Hall Forum
1119 8th Ave (Entrance off Seneca St.)
Seattle, WA 98101
Writer and biologist Audrey Delella Benedict, zoologist Geoffret Hammerson, and author, ornithologist, filmmaker Robert Butler have collaborated on a striking, beautiful new book, Pacific Flyway: Waterbird Migration from the Arctic to Tierra Del Fuego (Sasquatch Books).  “Visually stunning and expertly presented, [Pacific Flyway] spotlights bird migrations along the Pacific coast. In admiring prose, the authors marvel at seagulls, ducks, snow geese, and other ‘feathered ambassadors.’ Readers who want to learn about bird migrations will find this volume educational, while those simply in search of escape will find it a stimulating and scenic journey.”—Publishers Weekly. Presented by Town Hall Science series in partnership with Elliott Bay Book Company.   Tickets
 

02/19/2020 - 7:30pm

Town Hall Seattle
Thom Hartmann
Town Hall Seattle
1119 Eighth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98101
Acclaimed radio host and author Thom Hartmann makes this welcome Seattle return with the newest in his ‘Hidden History’ books, following The Hidden History of the Supreme Court and Its Betrayal of America and The Hidden History of Guns with the very timely, The Hidden History of the War on Voting: Who Stole Your Vote and How to Get It Back (Berrett-Koehler). “In this timely and important book, Thom Hartmann challenges us to fight for our fundamental right as American citizens to vote—a right that is not guaranteed in the Constitution but should be. For far too long, this basic principle of our democratic republic has been under constant attack, largely by corporate interests that literally profit from voter suppression. This book is an indispensable manual for waging—and winning—civic warfare. Use it!” —David Bender. “This engaging, brutally honest, and meticulously documented book is a must-read for every American who recognizes that our common future depends on achieving the democracy we thought we had but never did.”—David Korten. Presented by Town Hall Civics in partnership with Elliott Bay Book Company.   Tickets
 

02/20/2020 - 7:00pm

Hugo House
Gish Jen
Hugo House
1634 11th Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
One of our favorites, since her debut with Typical American nearly thirty years ago, the indomitable Gish Jen makes this welcome Seattle return, this evening to Hugo House, as part of its Words Work craft series. Evidence of her own remarkable skill at craft is abundantly apparent in her just-released novel, The Resisters (Knopf).   “In this astutely realized and unnervingly possible depiction of a near-future world, Jen masterfully entwines shrewd mischief, knowing compassion, and profound social critique in a suspenseful tale encompassing baseball ardor, family love, newly insidious forms of racism and tyranny, and a wily and righteous movement that declares “RIGHT MAKES MIGHT.” --Booklist. “The Resisters is palpably loving, smart, funny and desperately unsettling. The novel should be required reading for the country, both as a cautionary tale and because it is a stone-cold masterpiece. This is Gish Jen’s moment. She has pitched a perfect game.” --Ann Patchett. Presented by Hugo House. We will be there with The Resisters and Gish Jen’s remarkable body of work.   Tickets
 

02/20/2020 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
A.S. Hamrah
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Writer and film critic A.S. Hamrah has many admirers, including our booksellers at Elliott Bay, and we’re very excited to have the opportunity to host a conversation with him tonight about his work, some of which was collected in his book, The Earth Dies Streaming: Film Writing 2002-2018 (n+1).  “Hamrah is committed to his ambivalence, conveying it with a mixture of precision and conviction that will remind you how much more there is to be gleaned from a review than whether a movie is ‘good ’ or ‘bad ’ (even if it’s a movie you happen to deem very good or very bad indeed) . . . A political awareness imbues Hamrah’s criticism without weighing it down. He doesn’t succumb to a leaden moralizing because he pays close attention to the medium he’s writing about, alert to what he sees and hears.” —Jennifer Szalai, New York Times. A. S. Hamrah has been n+1’s film critic since 2008 and was the editor of the magazine’s film review supplement. He also writes for a number of other publications including Harper’s, The Baffler, and Bookforum. He has worked as a movie theater projectionist, a semiotic brand analyst, a political pollster, a football cinematographer, a zine writer, and for the film director Raúl Ruiz. Co-presented with Seattle International Film Festival.
 

02/21/2020 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Chana Porter with Rebecca Brown
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
In novelist Chana Porter’s novel, The Seep (Soho), a fifty-year-old trans woman’s life is irreversibly altered in the wake of a gentle--but nonetheless world-changing--invasion by an alien entity called The Seep. Through The Seep, everything is connected. Capitalism falls, hierarchies and barriers are broken down; if something can be imagined, it is possible. Trina and her wife, Deeba, live blissfully under The Seep's utopian influence--until Deeba begins to imagine what it might be like to be reborn as a baby, which will give her the chance at an even better life. A strange new elegy of love and loss, The Seep explores grief, alienation, and the ache of moving on.   "A unique alien invasion story that focuses on the human and the myriad ways we see and don't see our own world. Mesmerizing." --Jeff VanderMeer. "In Porter's surreal, introspective debut, a benevolent alien invasion leads humanity into a utopia, exploring themes of grief and discontentment within a seemingly perfect world . . . Readers will delight in the eerie disquietude and optimism of this well-calibrated what-if."--Publishers Weekly. Chana Porter is a playwright, teacher, MacDowell Colony fellow, and co-founder of the Octavia Project, a STEM and fiction-writing program for girls and gender non-conforming youth from underserved communities.  Chana will be appearing with Rebecca Brown, author of Not Heaven, Somewhere Else, American Romances and other books. 
 

02/22/2020 - 10:00am

Asian Art Museum
Saturday University with David L. Howell
Asian Art Museum
1400 East Prospect Street
Seattle, WA 98112
This morning the Saturday University morning’s winter series on ‘What is Precious?’ continues with David L. Howell, professor of Japanese History at Harvard,editor of the The Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies, and author, most recently of Geographies of Identity in Nineteenth-Century Japan. He will be speaking on ‘The Strange Case of the Castaway Princess and Other Stories of Japan in the Pacific.’  Presented by the GARDNER CENTER FOR ASIAN ART AND IDEAS, in partnership with the UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON JACKSON SCHOOL OF INTERNATIONAL STUDIES, the DUNHUANG FOUNDATION, and ELLIOTT BAY BOOK COMPANY.   Tickets
 

02/22/2020 - 11:00am

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Children's Storytime - ages 2 and up
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Join us for this fun hour of readings from picture and storybooks. Go to the castle in the children’s section… and the stories begin!
 

02/22/2020 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Ben Moon
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
In 2015, the short film Denali became a viral hit: The story of Ben Moon and his beloved dog, Denali, captured the hearts of 18 million viewers across the globe and was shared widely on The Today Show and Oprah Winfrey’s Super Soul Sunday, as well as at Buzzfeed, the Daily Beast, Glamour, and more. Ben Moon shares much more about this extraordinary story in his new book,  Denali: A Man, a Dog and the Friendship of a Lifetime (Viking). This is a story of two friends, one relying on the other through a rough divorce, cancer at a young age, an embarrassing colostomy bag, a struggling career as an adventure photographer, and rough break-ups. Eventually that friend supports the other through his own debilitating cancer and death. This is a story of friendship and love, of the bond between man and beast. It is a story that is universal in scope, yet intimate in its telling, about how to live, love, and—ultimately—say goodbye. Ben Moon is a Pacific City, Oregon based photographer, filmmaker and cancer survivor.
 
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02/23/2020 - 3:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Holly J. Hughes
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
From across the waters of the Salish Sea, we welcome back esteemed Pacific Northwest poet Holly J. Hughes. The author of the full-length collection, Sailing By Ravens and chapbook collections Boxing the Compass and Passings, she is here today with her stellar new collection, Hold Fast (Empty Bowl). "Holly J. Hughes writes poems that live, breathe, and 'dance two feelings at once.' They shine with gratitude; they are darkened by desire. They struggle against mortality; they bask in its beauty. Hold Fast is set in midlife as change ravages family, nation, and the earth, when nostalgia starts pulling the mind one way, yearning the other. And still, Hughes never overlooks the glories of the ordinary, sensory world—an autumn swim in the lake, a tangle of branches brought indoors. I'm so moved by these poems. They've become my companions."—Kathleen Flenniken
 

02/23/2020 - 3:00pm

Hugo House
A Remembrance of Judith Roche
Hugo House
1634 11th Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
This memorial celebrates the life, work, and memory of Seattle poet Judith Roche, who passed away on November 14th. She played an active role in helping guide poetry and its presentation in Seattle and beyond, in addition to her own strong work as a poet. Free entry, more information, here.
 

02/24/2020 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Jenny Offill
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Watch out: Jenny Offill’s new novel, Weather (Knopf), comes in a ‘package’ that is small physically, but that packs a huge wallop. The author of Last Things, While You Were Napping, and Dept. of Speculation has done it this time. “Compact and wholly contemporary, Jenny Offill’s third novel sees a librarian find deep meaning and deep despair in her side gig as an armchair therapist for those in existential crisis, including liberals fearing climate apocalypse and conservatives fearing the demise of ‘American values.’ As she attempts to save everyone, our protagonist is driven to her limits, making for a canny, comic story about the power of human need.”—Esquire. “The miracle of this novel is how it looks at our contradictions and conditions with such bracing honesty and yet gives us a tender hopefulness toward these fraught humans. Offill makes us feel implicated but also loved.” –Dana Spiotta. “No one writes about the intersection of love and existential despair like Jenny Offill.” –Jia Tolentino. “This is so good. We are not ready nor worthy.” –Ocean Vuong.
 

02/25/2020 - 7:00pm

Central Seattle Public Library
Ginger Gaffney
Central Seattle Public Library
1000 Fourth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98104
At the start of Half Broke: A Memoir (W.W. Norton), a remarkable story of recovery, healing, and redemption, horse trainer and writer Ginger Gaffney answers a call to help retrain the troubled horses at an alternative prison ranch in New Mexico, a facility run entirely by the prisoners. The horses are scavenging through the dumpsters, kicking and running down the residents . One horse is severely injured.  The horses and residents arrive at the ranch broken in one way or many: the horses are defensive and terrified, while the residents, some battling drug and alcohol addictions, are emotionally and physically shattered. With deep insight into how animals and humans communicate through posture, body language, and honesty of spirit, Ginger Gaffney walks us through her struggle to train the “untrainable.” “Written with clarity and compassion, Half Broke, is about the astounding power of horses to heal broken human beings. It shows a side of New Mexico that is seldom seen--the poverty and the struggle, but also the hopefulness and odd beauty of spirit within the people and the horses.”- Leslie Marmon Silko. Co-presented with Seattle Public Library.  Free admission. Please see www.spl.org for more information.
 

02/25/2020 - 7:30pm

Town Hall Forum
Conor Dougherty
Town Hall Forum
1119 8th Ave (Entrance off Seneca St.)
Seattle, WA 98101
West Coast-based New York Times economics reporter Conor Dougherty has written an all-too-timely new book in Golden Gates: Fighting for Housing in America (Penguin Press). Yes, it’s the Bay Area. It looks quite familiar here. “How do we solve a problem like California, with its three-hour commutes and sky-high rents? Deeply-reported and fast-paced, Golden Gates introduces you to the people fighting for and against affordable housing in one of the world’s hottest real estate markets. In following the clashes between political leaders, tenant activists, developers, and working families, Dougherty brings a novel perspective to one of the nation’s most urgent problems.”— Matthew Desmond. "Golden Gates is a terrific work of explanatory journalism. If you want to understand the colliding forces that have turned the San Francisco Bay Area into a housing powder keg and threaten to engulf many more cities across the country, you need to read this book.”—John Carreyrou. Presented by Town Hall Civics in partnership with Elliott Bay Book Company.   Tickets
 

02/26/2020 - 11:30am

The Elliott Bay Book Company
PJ Library Song & Storytime
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Our friends at PJ Library do these song & storytimes designed for tots, toddlers, and those looking after them at a few select bookstores in the area and visit as a regular feature of our Wednesday mornings. These are free and open to all and are usually thirty minutes of good fun, activity, and exploration of language, movement, and rhythm. Please join us in the Children’s Section by the castle!
 

02/26/2020 - 7:00pm

Hugo House
Emily Nemens
Hugo House
1634 11th Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Perfect timing. Spring in the air (or not) here, but decidedly so in Arizona, where baseball spring training is underway. That is the setting, in large part, of Seattle native Emily Nemens’ winning debut novel, The Cactus League (Farrar, Straus & Giroux). Emily Nemens is also editor of The Paris Review. Adrianne Harun, here to engage in conversation, is the prize-winning author of two short-story collections, most recent of which is Catch, Release. Free admission, though RSVP advised.
 

02/26/2020 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Mimi Lok with Joyce Chen
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
San Francisco-based Chinese writer Mimi Lok, whose work in the Bay Area has included serving as co-founder, Executive Director, and editor of the award-winning Voice of Witness, is here with a brilliant first book of stories, Last of Her Name (Kaya). “A mesmerizing and deeply felt debut that affirms all that is great about short fiction. ‘The Woman In the Closet’ has to be considered a new classic. Lok’s collection brings startling intimacy to her characters, all of them struggling with dislocation and belonging within the Chinese diaspora. I can’t think of a collection that better speaks to this moment of global movement and collective rupture from homes and history, and the struggle to find meaning despite it all.” - Dave Eggers. “Assured and keenly observed stories about the devastations—large and small—that transpire between people. Rendered in prose that’s no-nonsense, darkly funny, and lovely all at once, Lok’s stories carry quiet but undeniable impact. This is a book that stays with you long after you’ve put it down. It makes you wonder, as good books should, what on earth is going on in each of our brains.” - Rachel Khong. Mimi Lok will be joined onstage this evening in conversation with Joyce Chen, herself a writer and co-founder of The Seventh Wave. 
 

02/27/2020 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Mitchell Jackson
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
First published last year, award-winning writer Mitchell Jackson’s extraordinary Survival Math: Notes on an American Family (newly in paper, Scribner) was on several best of year lists. It also now stands as one of the best memoirs to come out of the Northwest in eons. Hailing from Portland, Mitchell Jackson, also author of the novel, The Residue Years, writes of all he had to survive in order to survive. "If you've read Mitchell S. Jackson, you already know he writes with a poet’s ear. In Survival Math he foregrounds how powerfully he writes with a poet's perception. His sentences radiate empathy. He perceives the lives of hustlers, prisoners, and ghosts. He speaks to and with and for his people-- which is to say, your people and my people. Mitchell S. Jackson’s insights into how black men survive become insights of everyone’s survival. This book is beautiful and vital." —Terrance Hayes. “Relentlessly clear-eyed and virtuosic, Survival Math offers revelation after revelation; in the end, it remakes our understanding of the world and those in it." —Jesmyn Ward. Co-presented by The Northwest African American Museum.
 

02/28/2020 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
John Sayles
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
We are pleased and honored to welcome back John Sayles, writer and filmmaker extraordinaire, an artist committed to doing work independent in spirit and in the spirit of solidarity with larger community and social purpose. He is here with a long-awaited new novel, Yellow Earth (Haymarket). “Densely textured, overtly political fifth novel, the acclaimed director and screenwriter recounts what happens when shale oil is discovered beneath an Indian reservation in the North Dakota badlands and crowds of outsiders descend.” —New York Times. “Without falling prey to false ‘both sides’ equivocation, Sayles masterfully balances and gives fair hearings to competing agendas and doesn’t shy away from the ugly side of human nature; by the same token, he doesn’t give in to cynicism or despair. What animates his fiction is curiosity about different kinds of people and their experiences, and an imagination expansive enough to portray their inner lives. He doesn’t fetishize diversity, but his stories are naturally diverse as a result of his engaged interest in the world around him. Now entering the fifth decade of his career, Sayles remains a standard-bearer for the American novel.” —Slant Magazine.  “John Sayles is a living master. Yellow Earth reminds me what novels are for.” —Jennifer Haigh.
 

02/28/2020 - 7:30pm

Hugo House
Hugo Literary Series with Mitchell S. Jackson, Charles D’Ambrosio, Anthony Swofford, & JusMoni
Hugo House
1634 11th Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
The third installment in this year’s Hugo Literary Series, featuring three writers and one musican’s take on a given theme, tonight gives us work on the subject, ‘Behind Closed Doors.’ Doing so here this evening are novelist and memoirist Mitchell S. Jackson (reading from his recent memoir, Survival Math, the night before, February 27, at Elliott Bay), Seattle native fiction writer and essayist Charles D’Ambrosio, memoir author Anthony Swofford, and R&B singer JusMoni.   Tickets
 

02/29/2020 - 10:00am

Asian Art Museum
Saturday University with Xiaoze Xie
Asian Art Museum
1400 East Prospect Street
Seattle, WA 98112
This morning the Saturday University morning’s winter series on ‘What is Precious?’ continues with Xiaoze Xie, artist and professor of art at Stanford. He will be discussing his recent solo exhibition at the Asia Society Museum in New York, his subject here being ‘Out of the Dark: Banned Books in China.’ He has also been artist in residence at the Dunhuang Foundation in China. Presented by the GARDNER CENTER FOR ASIAN ART AND IDEAS, in partnership with the UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON JACKSON SCHOOL OF INTERNATIONAL STUDIES, the DUNHUANG FOUNDATION, and ELLIOTT BAY BOOK COMPANY.   Tickets
 

02/29/2020 - 11:00am

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Children's Storytime - ages 2 and up
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Join us for this fun hour of readings from picture and storybooks. Go to the castle in the children’s section…and the stories begin!
 

02/29/2020 - 7:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
African American Writers Alliance Group Reading
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
For going on thirty years now, we have helped host this annual group reading program - wherever Elliott Bay has been - with Seattle’s utterly vital Northwest African American Writers Alliance. These group readings always feature a dynamic, wide variety of genres, voices, experiences, approaches - and much spirit and enthusiasm. For more on the NW African American Writers Alliance, tonight’s reading, and other NWAAWA activities over the year, please contact Living Legend honoree Georgia McDade (206.722.0964). 
 
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