November 2020

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11/02/2020 - 7:00pm

Virtual Event
John Hainze with Heidi Liere
Virtual Event
Months after it was originally scheduled, we finally get to present this now-virtual evening with debut author John Hainze. An entomologist and ethicist who is an adjunct faculty member at Seattle University, and is also affiliated with Seattle University’s Center for Environmental Justice and Sustainability, he is ‘here’ tonight with his creepily informative new book, Nature Underfoot: Living With Beetles, Crabgrass, Fruit Flies and Other Tiny Life Around Us (Yale University Press, with illustrations by Angela Mele). This is one that’s particularly apt for the many of us who’ve been walking more than usual in these pandemic times. Joining him in conversation will be Seattle University professor of environmental studies Heidi Liere. “In a world where insects are in horrible decline, this fascinating call for understanding and affection for the small creatures around us is a powerfully necessary book!”—Bill McKibben. “This is a fascinating book - one that will engage you with stories and charm you with drawings. Insects have never been more intriguing than under the watchful eye of John Hainze. He is an entomologist with a conscience. Our insect world deserves his plea for appreciation and care."—Mary Evelyn Tucker. Co-presented by Seattle University Department of Environmental Studies and Elliott Bay Book Company, & hosted via SU events)   Event Registration  
 

11/03/2020 - 8:00pm

VOTE
Election Day 2020
VOTE
If you haven’t yet, and are eligible: VOTE. Voter registration continues (in person) through today as well. Have it all in by 8 p.m. PST.
 
 
 

11/06/2020 - 7:00pm

Virtual Event
Pam Mandel with Paulette Perhach
Virtual Event
This evening, Seattle travel writer Pam Mandel celebrates the publication of her book, The Same River Twice: A Memoir of Dirtbag Backpackers, Bomb Shelters, and Bad Travel (Skyhorse), her account of a life-defining journey from the California suburbs to Israel to the Himalayan peaks and back. With no guidance and no particular plan, utterly unprepared for what lies ahead, shesays yes to everything and everyone, embarking on an adventure across three continents and thousands of miles, from a cold water London flat to rural Pakistan, from the Nile River Delta to the snowy peaks of Ladakh and finally, back home to California, determined to shape a life that is truly hers. Pam Mandel appears in conversation with Seattle writer Paulette Perhach. "A vivid, raw, and lyrical book that cuts deep from the very start, and reminds you that there are no shortcuts to healing. If you were skeptical of fairy tales as a kid, the moral of this gritty story will resonate: that sometimes, the only person coming to save you is yourself."--Geraldine DeRuiter, author of All Over the Place. Signed books are available for purchase.    Event Registration  
 

11/06/2020 - 7:00pm

Virtual Event
Daudi Abe with Fever One, Julie-C, King Khazm, & Nasty-Nes
Virtual Event
In the early 1980s, Seattle’s hip-hop artists developed a community-based culture of stylistic experimentation and multiethnic collaboration. Emerging at a distance from the hip-hop centers of New York City and Los Angeles, Seattle’s most famous hip-hop figures, Sir Mix-A-Lot and Macklemore, found mainstream success twenty years apart by going directly against the grain of their respective eras. In addition, Seattle has produced a two-time world-champion breaking crew, globally renowned urban clothing designers, an international hip-hop magazine, and influential record producers. In Emerald Street: A History of Hip Hop in Seattle (University of Washington Press), Seattle Central College professor Daudi Abe chronicles the development of Seattle hip hop from its earliest days, drawing on interviews with artists and journalists to trace how the elements of hip hop—rapping, DJing, breaking, and graffiti—flourished in the Seattle scene. He shows how Seattle hip-hop culture goes beyond art and music, influencing politics, the relationships between communities of color and law enforcement, the changing media scene, and youth outreach and educational programs. The result is a rich narrative of a dynamic and influential force in Seattle music history and beyond. Daudi Abe is a Seattle-based professor, writer, and historian who has taught and written about culture, race, gender, education, communication, hip-hop, and sports for over 20 years. He is the author of the books, 6 ‘N the Morning: West Coast Hip-Hop Music 1987-1992 & the Transformation of Mainstream Culture and From Memphis and Mogadishu: The History of African Americans in Martin Luther King County, Washington, 1858-2014 at www.BlackPast.org. Joining Daudi Abe tonight are Fever One, Julie-C, King Khazm, and Nasty-Nes. Presented by the Northwest African American Museum (www.naamnw.org) in partnership with Elliott Bay Book Company. General Admission is free or $35 tickets include the event and a signed copy of Emerald Street.   Event Registration  
 

11/07/2020 - 11:00am

Virtual Event
Virtual Civic Saturday: Rekindling Our Faith
Virtual Event
We were honored to be asked to host the very first Civic Saturday, organized by Seattle writer and activist Eric Liu and Citizen University within a few days after the 2016 election. Since then we've helped support many of these gatherings, which are now held nationwide and have become virtual events. Eric Liu's book, Become America: Civic Sermons on Love, Responsibility, and Democracy (Sasquatch Books), a collection of "civic sermons" delivered at these gatherings around the nation, recently won the 2020 Washington State Book Award and serves both as a document of the intervening years and a source of inspiration. Find out more about Civic Saturday (a meeting featuring poetry, a civic "sermon," readings of civic texts and music) at citizenuniversity.us.   Event Registration  
 
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11/08/2020 - 2:00pm

Virtual Event
Fenton Johnson with Dianne Aprile
Virtual Event
Fenton Johnson’s lyrical prose and searching sensibility explores what it means to choose to be solitary and celebrates the notion, common in his Roman Catholic childhood, that solitude is a legitimate and dignified calling. He delves into the lives and works of nearly a dozen iconic “solitaries” he considers his kindred spirits, from Thoreau at Walden Pond and Emily Dickinson in Amherst, to Bill Cunningham photographing the streets of New York; from Cézanne (married, but solitary nonetheless) painting Mt. St. Victoire over and over again, to the fiercely self-protective Zora Neale Hurston. Each character portrait is full of intense detail, the bright wakes they’ve left behind illuminating Fenton Johnson’s own journey from his childhood in the backwoods of Kentucky to his travels alone throughout the world and the people he has lost and found along the way. Combining memoir, social criticism, and careful research, At the Center of All Beauty: Solitude and the Creative Life (W.W. Norton)  resonates with all solitaries and all who might wish to carve out more space for solitude. Fenton Johnson is an award-winning author of fiction and nonfiction, he teaches at the University of Arizona and Spalding University. His previous books include Scissors, Paper, Rock; Everywhere Home and Geography of the Heart, which won a Lambda Literary Award.   Presented by Town Hall Arts & Culture in partnership with Elliott Bay Book Company.   Event Registration  
 
 

11/10/2020 - 6:00pm

Virtual Event
After the Election: Hope, Habitat, Defiance, and Democracy in America
Virtual Event
In the wake of this momentous election, we welcome you to join contributors to the anthology Dear America: Letters of Hope, Habitat, Defiance, and Democracy (Trinity University Press) for an evening of reading and conversation. We may not know what the results of the election will be, but we do know that art and activism are essential to a healthy democracy. We’ll hear from Washington State Attorney General, Bob Ferguson, on challenging the Trump administration’s illegal policies; poet and essayist Cherene Sherrard on the concept of sanctuary, in this moment of reckoning with the nation’s continued racism; and author Alison Hawthorn Deming on the “great spirit of inventiveness” we all can wield. Co-editors and hosts Simmons Buntin, Elizabeth Dodd, and Derek Sheffield will reflect on the Letters to America project from Terrain.org and invite solidarity through conversation with the online audience. Dear America is a timely congress of the personal and the political, a clarion call to find common ground and conflict resolution, all with a particular focus on the environment, social justice, and climate change  featuring personal essays, narrative journalism, poetry, and visual art from more than 130 contributors. Co-presented by The Elliott Bay Book Company and Terrain.org.   Event Registration  
 
 

11/12/2020 - 6:00pm

Virtual Event
Natasha Varner with María L.O. Muñoz
Virtual Event
We have long had the pleasure of working with the multitalented activist and scholar Natasha Varner, Communications and Public Engagement Director at Densho, who joins us tonight to speak about her own work as an historian focusing on race, identity and settler colonialism in Mexico and the United States. She will speak about her new book, La Raza Cosmética: Beauty, Identity, and Settler Colonialism in Postrevolutionary Mexico  (University of Arizona Press) with María L.O. Muñoz, author of Stand Up and Fight: Participatory Indigenismo, Populism, and Mobilization in Mexico, 1970–1984. La Raza Cosmética uses popular visual culture, such as photography, film, mural art, and beauty pageants to critically examine constructions of Mexican identity. While the book focuses on the 1920s-40s, the author makes the case that many of the visual tropes created at that time still inform how Indigenous women are depicted today. “Drawing together subtle cultural interpretation, rich historical context, and deft theoretical insight, Natasha Varner has crafted a powerful and compelling narrative, one not to be missed.” —Philip J. Deloria.   Event Registration  
 

11/13/2020 - 6:00pm

Virtual Event
Peter Godfrey-Smith
Virtual Event
‘Here’ quite possibly from Saturday, is Sydney-based author and professor Peter Godfrey-Brown. A philosopher, also author of Other Minds, and Theory and Reality, and a scuba diver of some renown, he is virtually appearing for his new book, Metazoa: Animal Life and the Birth of the Mind (Farrar, Straus & Giroux). "Peter Godfrey-Smith writes and thinks like no one else that I know of. He’s well immersed in the science of life, a deep-diver into the philosophical implications of the factual world—and a writer so skillful he can give a reader chills. Metazoa is his deepest dive to date on what life is, what life means; how we understand what we understand; and how we might continue peeling and peering into the many layers of remaining mystery, to further appreciate the astonishments of existence." —Carl Safina. Presented by Town Hall Science (www.townhallseattle.org) in partnership with Elliott Bay Book Company.   Event Registration  
 

11/14/2020 - 1:00pm

Virtual Event
Kae Tempest with Willy Vlautin
Virtual Event
Joining us across several time zones today from their home in Southeast London, poet, writer, performer Kae Tempest discusses On Connection (Faber & Faber), their first work of nonfiction, with fellow writer/musician Willy Vlautin. Drawing on twenty years' experience as a writer and performer, Kae Tempest explores how and why creativity - however we choose to practise it - can cultivate greater self-awareness and help us establish a deeper relationship to ourselves and the world. "On Connection is soul work ... The truth-speaker Kae Tempest takes to non-fiction with grace, musicality and innate essayistic skill. The book glows with their trademark honesty and questing integrity. On Connection is medicine for these wounded times."--Max Porter.   Kae Tempest is an award-winning Sunday Times-bestselling author, poet and recording artist. They read at Elliott Bay for the novel, The Bricks That Built the Houses. Named a Next Generation Poet by the Poetry Book Society, they released their fourth studio album, The Book of Traps and Lessons, in 2019. Willy Vlautin, who has read at Elliott Bay numerous times, is the author of several novels including, The Motel Life, Lean on Pete which won two Oregon Book Awards; and Don’t Skip Out on Me, a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner award. A new novel, The Night Always Comes, is due out in April 2021 - for which we hope he again returns.  He is the singer and songwriter of the band Richmond Fontaine and a member of the band The Delines.   Event Registration  
 
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11/15/2020 - 6:00pm

Virtual Event
Tamara Payne
Virtual Event
Were such things as in-person book tours happening, this evening would probably not happening at this time, as Tamara Payne, who worked with her father, the late journalist/author/editor Les Payne (1941-2018) on the monumental new biography, The Dead Are Arising: The Life of Malcolm X (Liveright), would likely have to be closer to New York, where activities attendant to this coming week’s National Book Award ceremonies would be taking place. They will still be taking place, albeit virtually - with Ms. Payne and this extraordinary book front and center as The Dead Are Arising is a National Book Award finalist for Nonfiction. Decades in the making, drawn from deep research and extended interviews and time with surviving members of Malcolm X’s family, this is a singular chronicle of a singular man and his times, what he lived for, lived through, and what killed him. “Meticulously researched and masterfully reported, this chronicle offers fresh insights and disturbing revelations that, among other things, strengthen the case for government complicity in the murder of Malcolm X. . . . A gripping read . . . [and] a worthy companion to Malcolm’s famed autobiography.” - Nathan McCall. “A brilliant and indispensable depiction of the life of Malcolm X. . . . Using the fruits of decades of interviews, [Payne] brings new information and perspectives on one of the most fascinating, and often misunderstood, figures in American history.” - Annette Gordon-Reed. Presented by Town Hall Civics (www.townhallseattle.org) and the Northwest African American Museum (www.naamnw.org) in partnership with Elliott Bay Book Company.   Event Registration  
 

11/16/2020 - 7:30pm

Virtual Event
Jim deMaine with Katy Sewall
Virtual Event
Dr. Jim deMaine joins us for this virtual conversation with writer Katy Sewall to consider these questions, drawing from his book Facing Death: Finding Dignity, Hope, and Healing at the End (Clyde Hill Publishing), a memoir about helping patients plan for a more peaceful, healing death. He shares stories from his 40 years in busy hospitals and ICUs, and walks through ethical questions around “heroic” interventions. Reaching beyond the traditional scope of a physician, he explores the role of spirituality, conflicts between doctors and families, cultural traditions, and more. Dr. deMaine invites us to a wise and large-hearted conversation, with advice pointing the way toward a grace-filled transition out of life. Jim deMaine spent nearly 40 years caring for severely ill patients and witnessing their final days as a pulmonary and critical care specialist. He was the chief of medical specialties and co-chaired the ethics committee at Group Health Cooperative (now Kaiser Permanente). He is honored to be a Clinical Professor of Medicine Emeritus at the University of Washington School of Medicine. His often dramatic experiences with patients near death led him to blog, then speak about their stories, with special attention to the issue of advocacy for patients unable to speak for themselves. Katy Sewall is the host and creator of “The Bittersweet Life” podcast.  Presented by Town Hall Science in partnership with Elliott Bay Book Company.   Event Registration  
 

11/17/2020 - 6:00pm

Virtual Event
Ngũgĩ wa Thiong'o
Virtual Event
We are utterly thrilled to be presenting this virtual evening with one of the great writers in the world, one who has been an essential, vital writer, teacher, and citizen, Kenyan author Ngũgĩ wa Thiong'o. He has made a number of Seattle and Elliott Bay-hosted visits in the past, but never one such as this virtual program he will be doing for his newest U.S. release, The Perfect Nine: The Epic of Gĩkũyũ and Mũmbi (The New Press). Originally published in Ngũgĩ’s original language, Gĩkũyũ, and then translated by Ngũgĩ into English, this is a vivid epic of the founding of the Gĩkũyũ people. “Essential reading and especially vital for our times. . . . Emphasizing fundamental cycles of birth, life, love, and death, this tale is centered on the Gĩkũyũ but connected to all of us and our humanity, a story to be told and retold, as it has been in various forms, for generations.”—Booklist. “Unfolding in wry and lyrical verse, The Perfect Nine tells a Homeric odyssey of the creation of the entire Gĩkũyũ people—a creationist myth, an adventure tale, and a family story, wherein the wives do not simply wait at home.” —Literary Hub. Ngũgĩ wa Thiong'o’s body of work includes novels, plays, stories, essays, memoirs, and children’s books, many of them speaking against colonization and its impacts, and against corruption of power whoever is exercising it. He has also worked long, hard, and passionately to keep African languages vital against the impact of those of the would-be colonizers. Among his enduring works: Weep Not, Child; A Grain of Wheat; Petals of Blood; The Wizard and the Crow; Decolonising the Mind; Barrel of a Pen; Secure the Base; and The Upright Revolution. This is one not to be missed.   Event Registration  
 

11/17/2020 - 6:00pm

Virtual Event
Ron Chew
Virtual Event
Third-generation Seattleite, historian, journalist, and museum visionary Ron Chew spent more than five decades fighting for Asian American and social justice causes in Seattle. In My Unforgotten Seattle (University of Washington Press), a deeply personal memoir, he documents the tight-knit community he remembers, describing small family shops, chop suey restaurants, and sewing factories now vanished. He untangles the mystery of his extended family’s journey to America during the era of the Chinese Exclusion Act. Intimate profiles of his parents—a waiter and garment worker—and leaders like Bob Santos, Ruth Woo, Al Sugiyama, Roberto Maestas, and Kip Tokuda are set against the familiar backdrop of local landmarks such as Sick’s Stadium, Kokusai Theatre, Shorey’s Bookstore, Higo Variety Store, Hong Kong Restaurant, and Chubby & Tubby. He highlights Seattle’s unsung champions in the fight for racial inclusion, political empowerment, American ethnic studies, Asian American arts, Japanese American redress, and revitalization of the Chinatown-International District. Chew himself led a successful campaign to transform a historic hotel into the Wing Luke Museum’s permanent home.   Presented by the Seattle Public Library Foundation.   Event Registration  
 

11/18/2020 - 6:00pm

Virtual Event
Lisa Feldman Barrett
Virtual Event
Lisa Feldman Barrett, Ph.D. shares some mind-expanding lessons from the front lines of neuroscience research, and discusses her new book, Seven and a Half Lessons About the Brain (Houghton Mifflin). She shares where brains come from, how they’re structured (and why it matters), and how yours works in tandem with other brains to create everything you experience. She also tackles popular myths such as the idea of a “lizard brain” and the alleged battle between thoughts and emotions, or between nature and nurture, to determine your behavior. "An excellent education in brain science...[Feldman Barrett] deftly employs metaphor and anecdote to deliver an insightful overview of her favorite subject... so short and sweet that most readers will continue to the 35-page appendix, in which the author delves more deeply, but with no less clarity, into topics ranging from teleology to the Myers-Briggs personality test to 'Plato's writings about the human psyche.' Outstanding popular science."--Kirkus. Lisa Feldman Barrett, PhD is a University Distinguished Professor of Psychology at Northeastern University, with appointments at Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital. She has received numerous scientific awards, including a Guggenheim fellowship and an NIH Director’s Pioneer Award, and is the author of How Emotions are Made. Presented by Town Hall Science (www.townhallseattle.org) in partnership with Elliott Bay Book Company.   Event Registration  
 

11/18/2020 - 7:00pm

Virtual Event
Daudi Abe with Jazmyn Scott
Virtual Event
Here’s another opportunity to hear Daudi Abe, this time in conversation with Jazmyn Scott  of Langston. In Emerald Street: A History of Hip Hop in Seattle (University of Washington Press),  Daudi Abe chronicles the development of Seattle hip hop from its earliest days, drawing on interviews with artists and journalists to trace how the elements of hip hop--rapping, DJing, breaking, and graffiti--flourished in the Seattle scene. He shows how Seattle hip-hop culture goes beyond art and music, influencing politics, the relationships between communities of color and law enforcement, the changing media scene, and youth outreach and educational programs. The result is a rich narrative of a dynamic and influential force in Seattle music history and beyond. Dr. Daudi Abe is professor of humanities at Seattle Central College and author of 6 'N the Morning: West Coast Hip-Hop Music 1987-1992 and The Transformation of Mainstream Culture. Jazmyn Scott is the Program Manager of LANGSTON; Seattle’s hub for Black arts and culture. Jazmyn Scott is the founder of The Town Entertainment and co-founder of 50 Next: Seattle Hip-Hop Worldwide, a digital “time capsule” highlighting Seattle and Northwest Hip-Hop, and later partnered with the Black Heritage Society of WA to plan the Black History Month Celebration at the Museum of History & Industry in 2014. The success of that event led to the opportunity to curate a community exhibit on Seattle Hip-Hop. Presented by The Seattle Public Library and Langston, with support from Elliott Bay Book Company.   Event Registration  
 

11/19/2020 - 6:00pm

Virtual Event
Ni Una Más
Virtual Event
Join a conversation with Washington state Poet Laureate Claudia Castro Luna, Justicia para Nuestras Hijas founder Norma Ledezma Ortega and Seattle Times visual journalists Corinne Chin and Erika Schultz, moderated by ProPublica investigative journalist Vianna Davila. Chin and Schultz – inspired by Castro Luna’s book Killing Marías – traveled to Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, to report on violence against women on the U.S.-Mexico border. The award-winning "Disappearing Daughters" (st.news/juarez-daughters) uses photos and video poetry to highlight the community of resilient mothers seeking justice for missing and murdered women. Ledezma Ortega will share her experiences as a lawyer fighting for justice for her daughter, Paloma, and other missing women in Mexico. Castro Luna will read selections from Killing Marías and talk about her inspiration for the poem. Chin and Schultz, International Women’s Media Foundation Adelante fellows and Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting grantees, will share their photos, video stories and experiences from Juárez. Q&A to follow the presentation. This online virtual event will be simultaneously broadcast in English and Espanol.  Co-presented by The Seattle Times, the International Women's Media Foundation, the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting and Elliott Bay Book Company, with support from Humanities Washington.   Event Registration  
 

11/19/2020 - 7:00pm

Virtual Event
Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore with Elissa Washuta
Virtual Event
We’re glad to help celebrate the launch of The Freezer Door (Semiotext(e)/Native Agents), Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore’s Capitol Hill-centric, unclassifiable and fiercely beautiful memoir tonight, virtually hosted by Hugo House. Mattilda has appeared many times on our stage and theirs, as a performer, interlocutor, literary curator and all around troublemaker, and she takes center stage tonight to discuss her new book with Elissa Washuta, currently teaching at the Ohio State University. (Her second book, White Magic, will be published by Tin House in 2021).   “Ferocious and tender, The Freezer Door, offers a complex  meditation on the trauma and possibility of searching for connection in a world that enforces bland norms of gender, sexual, and social conformity while claiming to celebrate diversity." “In a happy paradox common to great literature, it's a book about not belonging that made me feel deeply less alone. I so admire its appetite to get down and dirty, to wield non sequitur with grace and power, to ponder the past while sticking with the present, to quest unceasingly. I stand deeply inspired and instructed by its great wit, candor, inventiveness, and majesty.” - Maggie Nelson.   Matilda Bernstein Sycamore is the author of three novels and a memoir, and the editor of five nonfiction anthologies. Her memoir, The End of San Francisco, won a Lambda Literary Award, and her anthology, Why Are Faggots So Afraid of Faggots?: Flaming Challenges to Masculinity, Objectification, and the Desire to Conform, was an American Library Association Stonewall Honor Book.  Her latest title, the novel Sketchtasy, was one of NPR’s Best Books of 2018. She is currently at work on a new anthology, Between Certain Death and a Possible Future: Queer Writing on Growing up with the AIDS Crisis. Signed books are available for purchase!    Event Registration  
 

11/20/2020 - 6:00pm

Virtual Event
Priscilla Long with Sierra Nelson
Virtual Event
Tonight we welcome two Seattle writers, Priscilla Long and Sierra Nelson, whom we've featured on quite a few occasions "in person" at Elliott Bay. They'll visit us virtually this time, appearing in conversation and in poetry. They will read their red poems, their blue poems, their poems that shimmer with fuchsia and orange. They will talk about their strategies and approaches toward achieving multihued poems that may be compared to paintings or to bioluminescence. Priscilla Long's Holy Magic won MoonPath Press's Sally Albiso Poetry Book Award. Her first poetry book is Crossing Over (University of New Mexico Press. She is author of a collection of memoirist essays: Fire and Stone: Where Do We Come From? What Are We? Where Are We Going? (University of Georgia Press), a guide for artists titled Minding the Muse (Coffeetown), and The Writer's Portable Mentor: A Guide to Art, Craft, and the Writing Life. She is an independent teacher of writing and a member of the Cloud Appreciation Society. Sierra Nelson's books include The Lachrymose Report (PoetryNW Editions) and collaboration with artist Loren Erdrich I Take Back the Sponge Cake (Rose Metal Press). She is co-founder of The Typing Explosion and the Vis-a-Vis Society, and president of Seattle's Cephalopod Appreciation Society. She currently teaches through Writers in the Schools (WITS) and Hugo House. Signed books are available for purchase.    Event Registration  
 

11/20/2020 - 6:00pm

Virtual Event
Alberto Cairo
Virtual Event
Data visualization expert Alberto Cairo joins to discuss his new book, How Charts Lie: Getting Smarter About Visual Information (Norton) in which he introduces core competencies on analyzing charts, diagrams, and infographics. He argues that, to be informed citizens, we must all be able to decode and use the visual information that politicians, journalists, and even our employers present us with every day. Considering the decoding of charts an essential new literacy in our data-driven world, he examines contemporary examples ranging from election result infographics to global GDP maps, box office record charts—and even COVID graphics—to share the positives and negatives of relaying data visually. Alberto Cairo is the Knight Chair in Visual Journalism at the School of Communication of the University of Miami. He has consulted with companies and institutions such as Google and the Congressional Budget Office on visualizations. Presented by Town Hall Science in partnership with Elliott Bay Book Company.   Event Registration  
 
 
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11/22/2020 - 4:00pm

Virtual Event
Shirley Ann Higuchi and friends
Virtual Event
Author Shirley Ann Higuchi, J.D., chair of the Heart Mountain Wyoming Foundation, uncovers her family’s past and embarks on a transformational journey as she learns about the Japanese American incarceration during World War II and what happened to her family and those of other former incarcerees, a story that she tells in her book, Setsuko's Secret: Heart Mountain and the Legacy of the Japanese American Incarceration (University of Wisconsin Press). This story involves the founding of a museum at the Heart Mountain site, and an annual pilgrimage.   Shirley Ann Higuchi and the Heart Mountain Wyoming Foundation were also the instigators of the lawsuit and public outcry which halted the sale and dispersal of the Allen Hendershott Eaton collection (of art created by Japanese Americans during their incarceration). She will be joined by Darrell Kunitomi and Aura Newlin, who are also descendants of former incarcerees at Heart Mountain. They will discuss the book, the multigenerational effects of trauma and the incarceration’s relevance to contemporary issues of racism and identity in America. Tom Ikeda, Founding Executive Director of Densho based in Seattle, Washington will moderate the discussion.  This program is presented in partnership with Densho and the Heart Mountain Wyoming Foundation. The Seattle Chapter of the Japanese American Citizens League and Puyallup Valley Chapter of the Japanese American Citizens League are sponsors of the program. This event is supported by The Seattle Public Library Foundation, author series sponsors the Gary and Connie Kunis Foundation, and Seattle City of Literature. Thanks to media sponsor The Seattle Times. Elliott Bay Book Company is selling copies with an author signed book plate.   Event Registration  
 
 

11/24/2020 - 6:00pm

Virtual Event
John Luther Adams with Barry Lopez
Virtual Event
In the summer of 1975, a 22-year-old CalArts graduate moved to Alaska. Forty years later, with a rapidly warming Alaska and the crisis of climate change, he was faced with a difficult decision to leave a beloved state.Composer John Luther Adams author of Silences So Deep: Music, Solitude, Alaska (Farrar, Straus & Giroux), appears tonight in conversation with esteemed writer (and decades-long friend of Elliott Bay) Barry Lopez in what will be likely be a highlight of our late fall, post election season. He explores the impact of solitude, enriched by friendships with conductor Gordon Wright and poet John Haines, and describes the travails of environmental activism. Join Adams for a singularly rich account of a creative life that examines the challenges of life in the wilderness, demands of making art in an age of climate crisis, and the pleasures of intellectual fellowship. “ [Silences So Deep] offers a . . . meditative treatment of [this] central concern: How can people best use their gifts, and what are their larger responsibilities in doing so? . . . The outside world has provided an unusual dramatic structure for [Adams's] study of art and activism . . . Adams bears witness as the very texture of life--air, light, seasons, fauna--warps in Alaska, ground zero for climate change. --Lidija Haas, Harper's.   "John Luther Adams manages a mystic marriage to the world of wonder. This memoir is the work of an artist who is off the map but it leads to your soul. Read it and learn, as I did." --Iggy Pop.   John Luther Adams is an American composer and author. He was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Music and a Grammy Award for his orchestral composition Become Ocean, which was premiered by the Seattle Symphony Orchestra in 2013. He is also the author of Winter Music: Composing the North and The Place Where You Go to Listen: In Search of an Ecology of Music. Barry Lopez is an American author, essayist, and fiction writer whose work is known for its humanitarian and environmental concerns. Described as “the nation’s premier nature writer,” he is the recipient of numerous high honors and distinctions, the author of over a dozen fiction and nonfiction books, including Of Wolves and Men, Arctic Dreams: Imagination and Desire in a Northern Landscape, and 2019’s landmark work, Horizon. Presented by Town Hall Arts & Culture and the Seattle Symphony Orchestra in partnership with Elliott Bay Book Company.   Event Registration  
 
 
 
 
 
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11/30/2020 - 6:00pm

Virtual Event
Charles Baxter with Natalie Bakopoulos
Virtual Event
We are delighted to present this evening with one of the most accomplished fiction writers at work today, Charles Baxter. A master in the short-story, novel, and essay, and a revered teacher from long tenure at both the University of Michigan and the University of Minnesota, he visits virtually this evening with his much-awaited new novel, The Sun Collective (Pantheon). “Only the supremely talented Charles Baxter could write a novel that combines blistering social critique with humor, mysticism, passion, and grief. The Sun Collective speaks directly to the unsettled time in which we live. The characters in this brilliant, beautiful, and deeply insightful book will live on in your imagination for years.”—Julie Schumacher. “Fiction virtuoso Baxter’s artistry and merciless insights are in full, intoxicating flower in this sinuous, dark, and dramatic tale . . . He has brilliantly choreographed a wholly unnerving plunge into alarming aberrations private and public, festering political catastrophe, and woefully warped love.”—Booklist. Charles Baxter appears in conversation with Natalie Bakopoulos, author of Scorpionfish (Tin House Books) and The Green Shore (Simon & Schuster). Her work has appeared in the New York Times, Granta, Ploughshares, and The PEN/O. Henry Prize Stories. She’s an assistant professor of creative writing at Wayne State University in Detroit and a faculty member of the summer program Writing Workshops in Greece.   Event Registration  
 
 
 
 
 
 
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